Purposeful Pedagogy
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The Educator with a Growth Mindset: A Staff Workshop

The Educator with a Growth Mindset: A Staff Workshop | Purposeful Pedagogy | Scoop.it
I had the great privilege of facilitating a staff workshop on growth mindsets for the teachers and staff at Carlos Rosario International School.Staff were given access to the slide deck in order in...

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Purposeful Pedagogy
An online library of effective teaching techniques and methodologies which inspire enduring and meaningful learning.
Curated by Dean J. Fusto
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How We Learn What We Learn

From the big thinkers of the previous century that have influenced our own understanding of learning, to the strategic implementation of those pricnciples in designing pedagogy, this text sheds light on the great heritage that we draw upon in our...

Via Ness Crouch, Mark E. Deschaine, PhD
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Rabbi Avi Bossewitch's curator insight, March 3, 2015 8:16 PM

Excellent review of 20th century ed thought leaders and how they inform 21st century learning

Ivon Prefontaine's curator insight, April 20, 2015 7:20 PM

A short biography of a number of leading thinkers contributors work in education i.e. Dewey, Montessori, Freire, etc.

 

@ivon_ehd1

Skylly_W's comment, June 15, 10:40 PM
Great Share
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Four Skills to Teach Students In the First Five Days of School

Four Skills to Teach Students In the First Five Days of School | Purposeful Pedagogy | Scoop.it
Alan November explains how he would use the first five days of school to lay the groundwork for a year of learning that goes far beyond the test.
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Playing Is More Than Fun—It's Smart

Playing Is More Than Fun—It's Smart | Purposeful Pedagogy | Scoop.it
“Children who pretend, and grown-ups who immerse themselves in the imaginary realms of fiction and drama, are considering what would happen if the world were different, and working out the consequences. My former student Daphna Buchsbaum, now at the University of Toronto, and I, along with several colleagues, found that preschoolers who pretended more were better at “counterfactual” reasoning–figuring out what could have happened, but didn’t.”
Via Nik Peachey, Vicki Moro
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Nik Peachey's curator insight, August 19, 2:52 AM

Really interesting article with strong links to learning.

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5 Steps to Motivate Students to Mastery

Creating environment in which assessment is formative and motivating can be a challenge when most parents and students have experienced a grading system that is anything but supportive of learning.
It is possible, however, to help students believe in the value of academic practice and overcome the tendency toward completing academic work just for the grade. This approach moves away from the debilitating mindset that students won't do work that it isn't graded, and it gives them choices while holding them more accountable for their own learning. That idea might seem strange—that students will be more accountable when given more freedom of choice—but in my experience, it has worked.


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Project, Problem, and Inquiry-Based Learning

Project, Problem, and Inquiry-Based Learning | Purposeful Pedagogy | Scoop.it
What is the difference between PBL and Inquiry-based learning? https://t.co/d3PkeLs5cC #edchat #pblchat
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Personalized Learning: Enabling Student Voice and Choice Through Projects

Personalized Learning: Enabling Student Voice and Choice Through Projects | Purposeful Pedagogy | Scoop.it
Adapt these six tips to bring personalized learning projects into your classroom and build student engagement.
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Lisa Nielsen: The Innovative Educator: What's Your Classroom Inviting Students to Do? 4 Configurations to Consider.

Lisa Nielsen: The Innovative Educator: What's Your Classroom Inviting Students to Do? 4 Configurations to Consider. | Purposeful Pedagogy | Scoop.it
RT @jasonmkern: Classroom Setup On Your Mind? 4 Ideas for Setting Up the Modern Classroom https://t.co/vi0TppfCtX
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25 Reading Strategies That Work In Every Content Area

25 Reading Strategies That Work In Every Content Area | Purposeful Pedagogy | Scoop.it
Reading is reading. By understanding that letters make sounds, we can blend those sounds together to make whole sounds that symbolize meaning we can all exchange with one another.

Without getting too Platonic about it all, reading doesn’t change simply because you’re reading a text from another content area. Only sometimes it does.

Science content can often by full of jargon, research citations, and odd text features.

Social Studies content can be an interesting mix of itemized information, and traditional paragraphs/imagery.

Literature? Well, that depends on if you mean the flexible form of poetry, the enduring structure of a novel, or emerging digital literature that combines multiple modalities to tell a story. (Inanimate Alice, for example.)

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Victor Ventura's curator insight, August 14, 9:36 AM
This is a great resource.
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Teaching with Graphic Novels 

Teaching with Graphic Novels  | Purposeful Pedagogy | Scoop.it
Modern graphic novels have emerged as effective teaching tools that help improve literacy, explain complex concepts, and get students excited about reading.

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HCL's curator insight, August 14, 7:07 PM
Graphic novels can provide students with a number of reading benefits because of their unique style and presentation... they can improve literacy, explain complex concepts, and get students excited about reading.
Ana Cristina Pratas's curator insight, August 15, 2:29 AM

"Visual Storytelling Can Build Non-Visual Reading Skills


Although often grouped together, a graphic novel is not the same as a comic book. Unlike the Sunday comic stripes or short serialized superhero stories, graphic novels contain all of the aspects of any school-assigned book: a beginning, a middle, an end, conflict, character development, resolution, and many other literary characteristics. However, graphic novels often use panels and images to also tell the story.

“The most significant difference from a comic is that the graphic novel’s text is both written and visual,” English teacher Cat Turner explained to the National Council of Teachers of English. “Every part of each frame plays a role in the interpretation of the text, and hence, graphic novels actually demand sophisticated readers.”

 

This more diverse and complex style of storytelling may be especially beneficial to students who struggle with large sections of text. The combinations of short lines of text and images throughout may deliver the same information to a student as a lengthy paragraph, but feel more palatable.

 

Due to space limitations in a panel on on the page, graphic novels also showcase efficient writing, mirroring a habit that readers can practice themselves. The unique combination of image and text can also improve comprehension and even vocabulary, as students have more context to derive their clues from. The School Library Journal noted one example of graphic novels in the classroom where an educator gave half the class Hamlet as the traditional text and the rest the graphic novelization. Those who read the graphic novel spent almost one fewer hour reading and scored higher on a comprehension quiz later.

 

Some educators argue that reading through images can be just as important as learning to read through text, particularly with the proliferation of visual media. Graphic novels also provide nontraditional learners an opportunity to get excited about reading and thrive via the mixed medium.

 

“Graphic novels can be a way in for students who are difficult to reach through traditional texts,” educational publisher Scholastic explained. “Even those deemed poor readers willingly and enthusiastically gravitate toward these books. Readers who are not interested in reading or who, despite being capable of reading, prefer gaming or watching media, can be pulled into a story by the visual elements of graphic novels.”

 

When Graphic Novels Are Too Graphic
One of the major criticism over graphic novels is the depiction of violent, graphic, racy, or scandalous images. Some of the most famous graphic novels, such as the Watchmen and Persepolis, feature scenes or stories of serious violence.

 

However, advocates of graphic novels argue that the issue is often not with the content but the presentation. As SLJ noted, the problem may be what researcher Steven Cary calls the “naked buns” effect. This is a paradox where the text of the phrase “naked buns” is not perceived as offensive or indecent while the illustration of the phrase would be. It is the image not the concept that can lead to controversy.

 

In the past, the graphic memoir Fun Home has faced controversy when it was assigned as reading for college students due to its depiction of sex. Fellow autobiographical graphic novel Persepolis has also been protested when assigned to middle school students because of a scene involving torture. Following the “naked buns” argument, this content may only be seen as more offensive than traditional novels because of its illustration of the concepts versus its discussion of them.

However, many books that have been banned or censored throughout history in U.S. are now looked at as literary masterpieces and assigned regularly, such as The Canterbury Tales , The Grapes of Wrath , and the Adventures of Huckleberry Finn .

 

 

Ways to Begin Integrating Comics Into Curriculum
Graphic novels can provide students with a number of reading benefits because of their unique style and presentation, but this also makes it more difficult for educators to incorporate these works into their curriculum.

 

Shelley Hong Xu, associate professor in the department of teacher education at California State University, Long Beach, recommended that teachers start slow and learn more about graphic novels in general, according to the NCTE. Xu advocates for educators to spend time reading a graphic novel and noting their own comprehension skills.

 

“I think that every preservice and inservice teacher needs to experience this activity in order to better understand literacy knowledge and skills that students use with reading comics and graphic novels,” Xu said.

 

Teachers should also learn about the genre of graphic novels and what their students are most interested in learning or what their experience with the genre is. There are a number of graphic novels that are directly focused on historic events and may act as teaching tools on their own, but there are many others that would be meritless in the classroom.

 

Teachers who want to incorporate graphic novels into the curriculum should also expect some pushback from parents and administrators, Xu argued. Educators should explain how these texts can help students reach their education goals, improve reading comprehension, and provide other benefits. Students may be less likely to push back about the inclusion of graphic novels in class, but educators should be prepared to coach students on how to read graphic novels and deal with other difficulties that may arise.

 

Although graphic novels are unlikely to cure modern reading issues in the classroom, their unique style of storytelling and more exciting visual medium can help address specific pain points by attracting a wider variety of readers, leading to more consistent recreational reading and creating healthy reading habits."

Tina Jameson's curator insight, August 18, 7:08 PM
An interesting assessment of the effectiveness of using and analyzing graphic novels in the classroom, and of the controversial nature of the material that may also face educators.  However the writer of the article clearly sees the value of using graphic novels as a teaching tool.
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What the Heck is Inquiry-Based Learning?

What the Heck is Inquiry-Based Learning? | Purposeful Pedagogy | Scoop.it
Teachers use inquiry-based learning to combat the “dunno” -- a chronic problem in student engagement. Check out these four steps for creating inquiry-based curriculum.
Via Tom D'Amico (@TDOttawa)
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Project-based learning needs more learning

Project-based learning needs more learning | Purposeful Pedagogy | Scoop.it
After almost eighteen years in the field of education, I have become convinced of the need to transform the way our children learn so that they can confront the unknowable challenges of the twenty-first century.
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Why Making Is Essential to Learning

At the heart of making is the idea that all students are creators, and hands-on learning plays a key role in maker education.
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(Teaching Empathy) Why Danish Students Are Happier and More Empathetic

(Teaching Empathy) Why Danish Students Are Happier and More Empathetic | Purposeful Pedagogy | Scoop.it
Perhaps unlike their U.S. peers, kids in Denmark—where happiness levels are the highest on Earth—are taught in school to care for one another from a young age.

 

Training Activities

* Step by Step

Children in the Danish school system participate in a mandatory national program called Step by Step as early as preschool.  The children are shown pictures of kids who are each exhibiting a different emotion: sadness, fear, anger, frustration, happiness, and so on.

 

* CAT-kit 
This program is aimed at improving emotional awareness and empathy and focuses on how to articulate experiences, thoughts, feelings, and senses. Tools in the CAT-kit include picture cards of faces; measuring sticks to gauge intensity of emotions; and pictures of the body, on which participants can draw the physical aspects and location of emotions.

 

*My Circle:

Another tool is called My Circle: Children draw their friends, family members, professionals, and strangers in different parts of the circle as part of an exercise on learning to better understand others.

 

* Mary Foundation
named after the country’s crown princess and soon-to-be queen—has contributed to empathy training in schools, too. It’s anti-bullying program, which has been implemented across the country, encourages 3- to 8-year-olds to talk about bullying and teasing and learn to become more caring toward each other.

*interactive teaching 

 

by JESSICA ALEXANDER


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32 Research-Based Instructional Strategies -

32 Research-Based Instructional Strategies - | Purposeful Pedagogy | Scoop.it
You want to teach with what’s been proven to work. That makes sense.

In the ‘data era’ of education that’s mean research-based instructional strategies to drive data-based teaching, and while there’s a lot to consider here we’d love to explore more deeply, for now we’re just going to take a look at the instructional strategies themselves.

Via Marta Torán, Jim Lerman, Bonnie Bracey Sutton
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Marta Torán's curator insight, August 22, 1:54 PM
Una lista de estrategias para el diseño intruccional basadas en la investigación.
Gloria Huerta's curator insight, August 23, 12:12 AM
Estrategias para aprendizaje basado en la investigación, contiene links para ampliar algunas de ellas.
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Table Talk Math: Finally a Math Resource for Parents is Here! | Professional Learning for Busy Educators

Table Talk Math: Finally a Math Resource for Parents is Here! | Professional Learning for Busy Educators | Purposeful Pedagogy | Scoop.it

TableTalkMath.com has been started to send a weekly newsletter to interested parents who want to engage in a discussion involving math.


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Ideas We Should Steal: Teaching Empathy in Schools

Ideas We Should Steal: Teaching Empathy in Schools | Purposeful Pedagogy | Scoop.it
In Denmark, students learn empathy the way they learn math, in school. Not coincidentally, the Danes are the happiest people on earth

What children do not come by naturally is empathy, the ability to understand another person’s perspective and want to help them. Empathy, as it turns out, is a skill—akin to math or science or writing—that must be taught, over and over and over. And it must be taught. Not only does empathy help turn children into more pleasing people; it also is a key to forging social connections that contribute to overall happiness and success.

 

BY ROXANNE PATEL SHEPELAVY


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14 Messages Every Student Needs To Hear From You - by Terry Heick

14 Messages Every Student Needs To Hear From You - by Terry Heick | Purposeful Pedagogy | Scoop.it
by Terry Heick

Via Tom D'Amico (@TDOttawa)
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Sue Alexander's curator insight, August 20, 8:55 AM
Be this teacher.
Dr. Theresa Kauffman's curator insight, August 20, 9:25 PM
Excellent list!  Students need us to lift them up but with careful honesty...encouraging honesty.
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On A Mission To Race The Middle School Brain

On A Mission To Race The Middle School Brain | Purposeful Pedagogy | Scoop.it
How do you pedal a 200-pound pink brain — made of rubber, foam and steel — up 45-degree hills, through thick mud and water without breaking? These middle schoolers have eight months to figure it out.
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4 Student Engagement Tips (From a Student)

Harley CenterStudent EngagementHarley Center shares how relationships, humor, choice, and displaying his work engaged him, plus his three-minute video highlighting student work and personalized learning.
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Should we focus on teaching or learning?

Should we focus on teaching or learning? | Purposeful Pedagogy | Scoop.it
"Inquiry happens when you focus on the art of teaching." Kath Murdoch. This is an interesting moment in Kath's conversation with teachers. I lose focus on my note-taking as I pursue this thought... I tend to say 'focus less on teaching and more on learning', and here is Kath Murdoch, inquiry guru, expressing what, on the face of it,…

Via Skip Zalneraitis, Ines Bieler
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Community Post: 31 Incredible Bulletin Boards For Back To School

Community Post: 31 Incredible Bulletin Boards For Back To School | Purposeful Pedagogy | Scoop.it
Looking to refresh your classroom for back to school? Take your pick from 31 flavors of bulleti
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249 Bloom's Taxonomy Verbs For Critical Thinking

249 Bloom's Taxonomy Verbs For Critical Thinking | Purposeful Pedagogy | Scoop.it
249 Bloom's Taxonomy Verbs For Critical Thinking

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Curriculum Conversations: 7 Do's and Don'ts

Curriculum Conversations: 7 Do's and Don'ts | Purposeful Pedagogy | Scoop.it
While student input matters when creating curriculum, it's critical to manage their involvement and expectations in determining what and how they'll learn.

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Four STEM Tools to Get Kids Learning and Exploring Outdoors

Four STEM Tools to Get Kids Learning and Exploring Outdoors | Purposeful Pedagogy | Scoop.it
The four STEM apps get kids moving in different ways, whether by looking up at the sky, analyzing how their own bodies move, discovering unique objects to
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Lisa Nielsen: The Innovative Educator: Moving From Lecture to Learning

Lisa Nielsen: The Innovative Educator: Moving From Lecture to Learning | Purposeful Pedagogy | Scoop.it
Think of something you’re really good at. Something that is important in your career and something you are proud of. It could be your ability to manage a classroom well. It could be that you have found the key to get children to begin reading.
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How Can We Keep Teachers in the Classroom? | Edudemic

How Can We Keep Teachers in the Classroom? | Edudemic | Purposeful Pedagogy | Scoop.it
From low pay to lack of support, there are many reasons why schools struggle to keep teachers in the classroom. What can schools do to entice them to stay?
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