Purposeful Pedagogy
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How Well Do Schools Communicate?

How Well Do Schools Communicate? | Purposeful Pedagogy | Scoop.it
What's the current public attitude towards public schools? Anne O'Brien discusses the 2014 Gallup Poll findings and ponders positive ways the data can be used by teachers and schools.
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Purposeful Pedagogy
An online library of effective teaching techniques and methodologies which inspire enduring and meaningful learning.
Curated by Dean J. Fusto
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How We Learn What We Learn

From the big thinkers of the previous century that have influenced our own understanding of learning, to the strategic implementation of those pricnciples in designing pedagogy, this text sheds light on the great heritage that we draw upon in our...

Via Ness Crouch, Mark E. Deschaine, PhD
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Rabbi Avi Bossewitch's curator insight, March 3, 2015 8:16 PM

Excellent review of 20th century ed thought leaders and how they inform 21st century learning

Ivon Prefontaine, PhD's curator insight, April 20, 2015 7:20 PM

A short biography of a number of leading thinkers contributors work in education i.e. Dewey, Montessori, Freire, etc.

 

@ivon_ehd1

Skylly_W's comment, June 15, 2016 10:40 PM
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Teachers' Guide to Computational Thinking - CodeBC

Teachers' Guide to Computational Thinking - CodeBC | Purposeful Pedagogy | Scoop.it
A BC Teacher’s Guide to Computational Thinking will provide an introduction and overview to computational thinking and help you identify areas where computational thinking already exists within your curriculum.

This course will take approximately 1 hour to complete.

Via John Evans, Ines Bieler
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Redefining Failure in the classroom by Ben Johnson

Redefining Failure in the classroom by Ben Johnson | Purposeful Pedagogy | Scoop.it
Why encouraging students to get everything right is the wrong direction.

Via Tom D'Amico (@TDOttawa)
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Ivon Prefontaine, PhD's curator insight, April 22, 6:48 PM
"Why encouraging students to get everything right is the wrong direction." It is. When we did not get the right answers, I asked students what might have happened to lead to the "failure?" Having students and teachers explore those questions can be quite fruitful.
Dr. Theresa Kauffman's curator insight, April 23, 9:46 PM
A very interesting twist on the growth mindset. What do you think?
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27 Classroom Whiteboard Sketches That Prove Teachers Are the Best - WeAreTeachers

27 Classroom Whiteboard Sketches That Prove Teachers Are the Best - WeAreTeachers | Purposeful Pedagogy | Scoop.it
27 Classroom Whiteboard Sketches That Prove Teachers Are the Best

Via Cyndi Danner-Kuhn, Yashy Tohsaku
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Digital Storytelling Wheel for Teachers

Digital Storytelling Wheel for Teachers | Purposeful Pedagogy | Scoop.it
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Today's Teaching Force Is Larger, Less Experienced, More Diverse Than Ever

Today's Teaching Force Is Larger, Less Experienced, More Diverse Than Ever | Purposeful Pedagogy | Scoop.it
Over the past 25 years, the U.S. teacher workforce has grown larger, less experienced, and more diverse. But according to a new report, these changes have not affected all types of teachers and schools equally. 

The report by Richard Ingersoll, a professor of education and sociology at the University of Pennsylvania, and Lisa Merrill of New York University's Research Alliance for New York City Schools, an organization that studies the local education scene, used the Schools and Staffing Survey to analyze changes in the elementary and secondary teaching force from 1987 to 2012. The Schools and Staffing Survey includes information on teachers' backgrounds, qualifications, and work locations. Key findings fall into several categories:

Via Mel Riddile
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Poetry Writing Made Fun: 10 Cool Teaching Ideas by CHERYL MIZERNY

Poetry Writing Made Fun: 10 Cool Teaching Ideas by CHERYL MIZERNY | Purposeful Pedagogy | Scoop.it
BY CHERYL MIZERNY

Via Tom D'Amico (@TDOttawa)
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The Teenage Brain Is Wired to Learn—So Make Sure Your Students Know It

The Teenage Brain Is Wired to Learn—So Make Sure Your Students Know It | Purposeful Pedagogy | Scoop.it

Thanks to the wonders of neuroplasticity, adolescents are primed to improve their performance in school—and beyond. Here’s how to help.


Adolescence is an exciting time as teenagers become increasingly independent, begin to look forward to their lives beyond high school, and undergo many physical, emotional, and cognitive changes. In that last category, teenagers can learn to take charge of their developing brains and steer their thinking in positive and productive directions toward future college and career success.


Via Elizabeth E Charles
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Karina Ellemberger's curator insight, April 10, 9:15 AM
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Ivon Prefontaine, PhD's curator insight, April 10, 1:38 PM
This makes sense. After infancy, adolescence from about 11 to 23 years, depending on the person, is the second most significant time for learning.
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A List of 26 Gratitude Exercises, Activities, Worksheets, Games, and Ideas

A List of 26 Gratitude Exercises, Activities, Worksheets, Games, and Ideas | Purposeful Pedagogy | Scoop.it
Use this list of 26 gratitude exercises to develop your own gratitude practice or use these worksheets to teach others about the science of happiness!

Via Ariana Amorim
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The Big List of Board Games that Inspire Mathematical Thinking

The Big List of Board Games that Inspire Mathematical Thinking | Purposeful Pedagogy | Scoop.it
These board games incorporate math in unique and fun ways!

Via Chris Carter, Bonnie Bracey Sutton, diane gusa, Ines Bieler
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Chris Carter's curator insight, April 4, 7:05 PM
Maths come in many forms. Why not choose the forms that interest the most kids?
Ivon Prefontaine, PhD's curator insight, April 10, 1:42 PM
When I taught, students enjoyed board and card games. They provided opportunities to develop strategies, learn, and form social skills. I am not familiar with the games on the list, but I imagine they would provide similar learning opportunities.
Rescooped by Dean J. Fusto from Studying Teaching and Learning
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STEM and Writing: A Super Combination - Edutopia

STEM and Writing: A Super Combination - Edutopia | Purposeful Pedagogy | Scoop.it

"I brought a superhero into my classroom the other day. He wasn't wearing a cape. He didn't have an alias. But he had the greatest superpower of all: inspiration.

When you teach using project-based learning (PBL), one brings outside expertise into the classroom. My eighth graders begin the year creating science fiction based origin stories for original superhero characters as an introduction to a greater advocacy unit. Therefore, it seemed natural to bring in an actual scientist. Which brought me to CalTech and Dr. Spyridon Michalakis."


Via John Evans, Stewart-Marshall
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Chris Carter's curator insight, April 4, 8:23 PM
Using varied modalities for reflection and processing is an excellent practice.
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Four Teaching Moves That Promote A Growth Mindset In All Readers - MindShift

Four Teaching Moves That Promote A Growth Mindset In All Readers - MindShift | Purposeful Pedagogy | Scoop.it
Reading can be a very fraught topic for parents, teachers and students. Strong reading skills are essential for accessing later curriculum, so teachers put a lot of emphasis on it early. But the pressure and angst of getting students reading on schedule can sap the joy out of an activity that many young children love. At its heart, reading is a way to access stories, which in turn make readers wonder about the world. In the race to get kids reading, it can be easy to treat reading like a procedure, instead of the complicated experience that it is.

Via John Evans
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Ashley Marie Shepherd's curator insight, April 4, 11:38 PM

Teaching and Learning

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The User's Manual To Design Thinking Your Teaching (Infographic)

The User's Manual To Design Thinking Your Teaching (Infographic) | Purposeful Pedagogy | Scoop.it
What I love about Design Thinking is that it's flexible. There are teaching approaches out there that tell us what to do, but it makes more sense for every teacher to teach differently every year, because we each get different students.
Think about it. We don't treat all our friends and family the same. Our interactions with them are largely based on our experience of who they are and what makes them tick. Teaching is the same way. One size fits all approaches do not work.

The challenge is that, in the grand scheme of things, we only know our students for a short time. However, personalization of education is not a fad; it's a thing. So. let's use the Design Thinking Cycle (Empathy, Definition, Ideation, Prototyping, Testing) to improve Teaching, shall we?

Via Ariana Amorim, Chris Carter
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Nevermore Sithole's curator insight, April 3, 2:36 AM
Design Thinking
R's curator insight, April 6, 1:36 PM
Learning is not a destination, it is a journey. We are never done. If we stopped when we learned something, we'd all be sitting in the dark without computers.
Maureen Orey's curator insight, April 17, 12:24 PM
InterestIngram info graphic! #talentmanagement
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Research Guides: Education: Mathematics Teacher Resources

Research Guides: Education: Mathematics Teacher Resources | Purposeful Pedagogy | Scoop.it

Via the Scout Report

 

"The University of Michigan Library offers this helpful list of web resources for teaching mathematics. This list includes items that will appeal to K-12 mathematics instructors, adult educators, and college level mathematics instructors alike. Resources are divided into three categories: resources for teachers (most resources fall into this category), resources for algebra, and resources for statistics. While some of the links included on this list no longer work, most will take visitors to working pages. Included are teaching tips, videos to incorporate into the classroom, websites, free online textbooks, printable worksheets, games, and more. The diversity of these resources offers a useful one-stop shop for instructors looking for additional materials or ideas."


Via Jim Lerman, Mark E. Deschaine, PhD
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Where Good Ideas Come From & How Your Classroom Can Respond

Where Good Ideas Come From & How Your Classroom Can Respond | Purposeful Pedagogy | Scoop.it
Steven Johnson discusses where good ideas come from, and TeachThought offers takeaways for teachers.

Via EDTECH@UTRGV, Stewart-Marshall
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Ivon Prefontaine, PhD's curator insight, April 21, 2:19 PM
For me, the key take away was not to get to caught up in the packaged curriculum and policy i.e. using computers. How do the experiences of students and their problems help a teacher? How does a teacher's lived-experiences, their own curriculum, inform them and their teaching
Karen Bonanno's curator insight, April 23, 6:26 PM

Make them short, sharp and shiny. 

Mick jones's comment, Today, 6:56 AM
Visit here:- https://soundcloud.com/dove-nobel/the-best-technical-support-for-mozilla-browser
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Blogging for Teachers

Blogging for Teachers | Purposeful Pedagogy | Scoop.it

Blogging is very popular among students, but what about teachers? They are catching up, and it’s easy to see why as blogging enables them to keep in touch with their students and colleagues outside of work, while at the same time sharing insightful ideas. The following article will teach you why and how to run a blog as a teacher.

Reasons You Should Blog

Share ideas – sharing your ideas and thoughts with the world allows you to become a part of an active online community and exchange ideas with other blogging teachers, as well as readers.Keep up with your students – it will help you become more in tune with the way they think, learn, and live their lives.Develop yourself personally and professionally – another reason why great teachers blog is because it allows them to never stop learning.Lead by example – blogging yourself is one of the easiest ways to get your students to blog as well.
Via Edumorfosis, Ines Bieler, Yashy Tohsaku
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Angélica Potes's curator insight, April 18, 10:26 PM
At this moment, the evolution of technology allows us to take advantage of every minimal feature to our own benefit. One of the greatest values of the today's technology is the communication since it has improved a lot at such a point that we can choose the way we are going to communicate, texting, talking or by a videocall. Hence, there are some other alternatives like blogs which are something more formal where we can put in use in the role of teachers with our students. In that way, we can avoid having our students in the social networks, something that can be taken as possible misunderstandings in a future. Therefore, we can share documents, write messages, publish ideas and thoughts, post videos and we can ask students to comment important things, create forums and to develop tasks that we can give them by this virtual way.
Ivon Prefontaine, PhD's curator insight, April 19, 2:13 PM
There are some good ideas. An essential part is to discover one's niche, otherwise the blog becomes inauthentic and formulaic. It is just one of many.
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Teaching strategies about source credibility

Teaching strategies about source credibility | Purposeful Pedagogy | Scoop.it

"Here are some teaching strategies we can use to evaluate the credibility of a resource ..."


Via Leona Ungerer
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How To Master The Art Of Taking Better Notes

How To Master The Art Of Taking Better Notes | Purposeful Pedagogy | Scoop.it
The process of writing something down can help you better remember it, so here’s how to get the most out of your notes.

Via Ariana Amorim
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Opinion | The Wrong Way to Keep Kids Safe From Predators

Opinion | The Wrong Way to Keep Kids Safe From Predators | Purposeful Pedagogy | Scoop.it
They need more than protection; they need the chance to develop survival skills.

Via Peter Mellow
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Teachers Going Gradeless – Arthur Chiaravalli – Medium

Teachers Going Gradeless – Arthur Chiaravalli – Medium | Purposeful Pedagogy | Scoop.it


After years of teaching using the principles of standards-based learning and grading, I encountered two findings that radically changed my perspective on assessment, grading, and reporting. 

The first finding comes from Ruth Butler (1988, as cited in Wiliam 2011) regarding feedback. Butler examined 3 types of feedback: scores alone, comments alone, and scores with comments. Her study showed that scores alone made students either complacent or unmotivated depending on how well they did. Scores with comments were just as ineffective in that students focused entirely on the score and ignored the comments. Surprisingly, it was the students who received comments alone that demonstrated the most improvement. 

 The second finding comes from John Hattie (2012) whose synthesis of 800 meta-studies showed that student self-assessment/self-grading topped the list of educational interventions with the highest effect size. By teaching students how to accurately self-assess based on clear criteria, teachers empower them to become “self-regulated learners” able to monitor, regulate, and guide their own learning. The reason students never develop these traits is that our monopoly on assessment, feedback, and grading has trained students to adopt an attitude of total passivity in the learning process.



Via Kim Flintoff
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Kim Flintoff's curator insight, April 11, 8:17 PM
After years of teaching using the principles of standards-based learning and grading, I encountered two findings that radically changed my perspective on assessment, grading, and reporting. 

The first finding comes from Ruth Butler (1988, as cited in Wiliam 2011) regarding feedback. Butler examined 3 types of feedback: scores alone, comments alone, and scores with comments. Her study showed that scores alone made students either complacent or unmotivated depending on how well they did. Scores with comments were just as ineffective in that students focused entirely on the score and ignored the comments. Surprisingly, it was the students who received comments alone that demonstrated the most improvement. 

The second finding comes from John Hattie (2012) whose synthesis of 800 meta-studies showed that student self-assessment/self-grading topped the list of educational interventions with the highest effect size. By teaching students how to accurately self-assess based on clear criteria, teachers empower them to become “self-regulated learners” able to monitor, regulate, and guide their own learning. The reason students never develop these traits is that our monopoly on assessment, feedback, and grading has trained students to adopt an attitude of total passivity in the learning process.
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Eight things I learned my first year of teaching with project-based learning -

Eight things I learned my first year of teaching with project-based learning - | Purposeful Pedagogy | Scoop.it

"My first year of teaching with project-based learning provided as much learning for me as it did my students ..."


Via Leona Ungerer
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How Kids Benefit From Learning To Explain Their Math Thinking

How Kids Benefit From Learning To Explain Their Math Thinking | Purposeful Pedagogy | Scoop.it
Students are never too young to explain their thinking. When teachers encourage them to back up their claims with evidence from a young age, they will be more

Via Bookmarking Librarian, diane gusa
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9 TED Talks recommended by students, for students

9 TED Talks recommended by students, for students | Purposeful Pedagogy | Scoop.it
Which TED Talks do students love? We asked TED-Ed Club Members around the world to share their favorites. Below, check out 9 great talks recommended by and for young people: 1. Cameron Russell: Loo…

Via Ana Cristina Pratas
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Adding student choice to formative assessment - By Mike Anderson

Adding student choice to formative assessment - By Mike Anderson | Purposeful Pedagogy | Scoop.it
By Mike Anderson

Via Tom D'Amico (@TDOttawa) , Ines Bieler
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RebeccaMoore's curator insight, April 15, 2:11 PM
This Edutopia article presents simple ideas for formative assessments in which students communicate their level of comfort with content. I particularly like the square/triangle/circle task and other exit slip ideas.
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You should never let your kids use your earbuds—here's why

You should never let your kids use your earbuds—here's why | Purposeful Pedagogy | Scoop.it
Experts warn that you can permanently damage your hearing by listening at loud volumes, our tests show even cheap earbuds can go far beyond what's recommended.

Via Peter Mellow
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How Adding Math to a Child’s Home Routine Can Advance Achievement

How Adding Math to a Child’s Home Routine Can Advance Achievement | Purposeful Pedagogy | Scoop.it
A new study published in the journal Science shows that regular use of a specific math-based iPad app significantly improved math performance in elementary

Via Peter Mellow
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