Purposeful Pedagogy
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Why I Love Teachers

Why I Love Teachers | Purposeful Pedagogy | Scoop.it
There are teachers, and there are Teachers. I respect anyone who steps into a classroom, but I adore educators for whom teaching is as much a vocation as a job. Why? Because when Teachers go on vac...

Via Shanthi Cumaraswamy Streat
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Purposeful Pedagogy
An online library of effective teaching techniques and methodologies which inspire enduring and meaningful learning.
Curated by Dean J. Fusto
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How We Learn What We Learn

From the big thinkers of the previous century that have influenced our own understanding of learning, to the strategic implementation of those pricnciples in designing pedagogy, this text sheds light on the great heritage that we draw upon in our...

Via Ness Crouch, Mark E. Deschaine, PhD
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What Impacts Teacher Salaries Infographic

What Impacts Teacher Salaries Infographic | Purposeful Pedagogy | Scoop.it

For those who choose teaching as a career, it isn’t typically for the high paycheck. But, there are some things that can have a positive or negative influence on a teacher’s pay. And some of them may surprise you. University What you teach can increase or decrease your... http://elearninginfographics.com/what-impacts-teacher-salaries-infographic/


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My Ideal Teacher Bookshelf

My Ideal Teacher Bookshelf | Purposeful Pedagogy | Scoop.it
Sarah has built a professional learning bookshelf. See her recommendations and build your own.

Via Mel Riddile
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For Students, the Importance of Doing Work That Matters

For Students, the Importance of Doing Work That Matters | Purposeful Pedagogy | Scoop.it
If our students look at the work we’re asking them to do today and say “It doesn’t matter,” we’re missing a huge opportunity to help them become the learners they now need to be.

Via Cecilia Rosas, Aki Puustinen
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Cecilia Rosas's curator insight, July 6, 3:49 PM

Instead of passing paper, digital or otherwise, back and forth between students and teacher, what if we allowed students to do real work for real audiences that can read and interact far beyond the limits of the school walls, schedule, and curriculum? What if we let our students do work that they actually cared about and wanted to create, not for a grade but because of its potential contribution to and effect on the world?

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Teaching ESL- Incorporating Learning Styles into your Lesson Plans

Teaching ESL- Incorporating Learning Styles into your Lesson Plans | Purposeful Pedagogy | Scoop.it
Not everybody learns the same way. One student can understand a concept perfectly after simply listening to a lecture. Another student can only learn something new if she reads from the text book first and then listens to a lecture. Another student hates reading, but will learn a concept through practice and physical interaction with…

Via TeachingEnglish
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Teach the Key Ingredients for Leadership Success

Teach the Key Ingredients for Leadership Success | Purposeful Pedagogy | Scoop.it

Claudio Fernández-Aráoz, a world expert on hiring, did a study of C-level leaders who were fired. The conclusion: they were hired for their intelligence and business expertise, but fired for weakness in emotional intelligence – usually the social variety.


When I looked at competence studies done by companies to identify the skill sets of their outstanding performers – what sets top leaders apart from average – the vast majority fell in the emotional intelligence category.


With a fresh crop of college grads heading into a tight job market, I wish they had had help in developing their emotional intelligence skills during their studies. But with a very few exceptions colleges ignore this crucial skill set for success. Students acquire these abilities on their own time, and rather randomly, depending on happenstance.


Via Anne Leong, Wise Leader™, Roger Francis, David Hain
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Tom Hood's curator insight, July 4, 8:54 AM

Having just finished our fifth class of Leadership Academy for our emerging CPA leaders, this article resonated  with me. While the notion of EQ as a critical leadership quality is on point, I think it must be in the context of how leadership is changing in this hyper-connected, rapidly changing world. When we asked our emerging leaders to compare and contrast leadership across the ages, they identified the common traits we all know - vision, communication, passion, and authority. Yet when looking at the current state, they added words like collaborative, transparent, more communication,.

 

These skills include the ability to engage and inspire followers to a shared vision and action. The other critical piece is to 'know themselves' in a way they can be that authentic leader with their own unique style rather than trying to fit some standard leadership model that forces them to change. We do this with Strengths-Finders and Values to help them become self-aware.

 

Thus I see the idea of EQ to include specific group dynamics, collaboration, listening, and making your thinking visible to others. These skills can be taught and developed and we are seeing emerging leaders  able to apply these as they grow into the kind of future leaders we will need.

Robin Martin's curator insight, July 4, 1:51 PM

Absolutely...however, students need to have the "grit'" and tenacity to survive as well as to thrive in this world. Some, if not most, of us Boomers learned this during our lifetimes, most likely the "hard way," so to speak.

 

Just being able to focus in the digital world for younger people (mainly younger children) has to be a challenge in itself! While the digital age is perfect for them to learn as quickly as their brains are moving, somewhere there has to be a delicate "balance" to keep them grounded. 

 

Yes, we do need to align the skill sets needed to survive and become great leaders with what we're teaching young children. I predict an education overhaul in the very near future! 

Marisol Araya Fonseca's curator insight, July 5, 12:28 PM

Bring the real life to the classroom to shorten the gab between the classroom and their future lives outside the classroom.

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Top 12 Summer Tips for Top Teachers - Edutopia

Top 12 Summer Tips for Top Teachers - Edutopia | Purposeful Pedagogy | Scoop.it
For top teachers, the list of 12 tips for maximizing your summer vacation includes reflecting, connecting, laughing, and coming out swinging in September.

Via John Evans
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What Students Do Better Than Teachers

What Students Do Better Than Teachers | Purposeful Pedagogy | Scoop.it

What Students Do Better Than Teachers


Via Mary Perfitt-Nelson, David Mackzum, Ed.D.
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Ivon Prefontaine's curator insight, July 3, 1:23 PM

Both Dewey and Whitehead commented that children live in the present and long-term goals are the work of adults.

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The Teacher's Guide To Choosing The Best Digital Content - Edudemic

The Teacher's Guide To Choosing The Best Digital Content - Edudemic | Purposeful Pedagogy | Scoop.it
Here's a handy visual step-by-step guide to choosing the best digital content for a blended learning environment. Useful for all skill levels!

Via Cindy Rudy
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How to Apply Design Thinking in Class, Step By Step

How to Apply Design Thinking in Class, Step By Step | Purposeful Pedagogy | Scoop.it
For educators ready to try the idea of design thinking, you'll be glad to know it does not require extensive transformation of your classroom. That said, it can be a transformative experience for all involved.

Via Becky Roehrs
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50 Questions To Promote Metacognition In Students

50 Questions To Promote Metacognition In Students | Purposeful Pedagogy | Scoop.it
50 Questions To Help Students Think About What They Think

Via David Mackzum, Ed.D.
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Map Terms Kids Should Know About

Map Terms Kids Should Know About | Purposeful Pedagogy | Scoop.it
June 30, 2014
Teaching kids how to use and work on maps starts first with getting them acquainted with the map terminology. These are the different geographic terms and map concepts that will allow...
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Student Autonomy

Student Autonomy | Purposeful Pedagogy | Scoop.it
Empowering Students In the Classroom

 

When I think of change that needs to happen in Education, my immediate thought goes toward student autonomy. To be autonomous as a student is to be able to independently manage the freedom one has in the classroom, while maintaining a harmonious relationship with the teacher.

 

For a student to be autonomous, a student must realize:

They have a voiceTheir voice mattersIt will be heardIt will make a difference

 


Via Gust MEES, Silverback Learning, Ivon Prefontaine
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Gust MEES's curator insight, June 30, 9:00 PM

This fits by 100% my meaning also!

When I think of change that needs to happen in Education, my immediate thought goes toward student autonomy. To be autonomous as a student is to be able to independently manage the freedom one has in the classroom, while maintaining a harmonious relationship with the teacher.

For a student to be autonomous, a student must realize:

  • They have a voice
  • Their voice matters
  • It will be heard
  • It will make a difference


Ivon Prefontaine's curator insight, July 1, 12:54 PM

Student autonomy happens with teacher autonomy. Gert Biesta proposes democracy happens in classrooms where it is lived and modeled. It is not a distant process. The word is not autonomy but emancipation which is responsible for the Other and the world we live in.

Stevi Quate's curator insight, July 2, 9:28 AM

When John McDermott and I wrote Clock Watchers and The Just Right Challenge, we wrote about empowering students and captured similar ideas to this posting. Since these ideas aren't new and seem to be shared widely, I wonder why these ideas aren't the norm in classrooms that we watch.

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Made From History is a Must-bookmark for History Teachers and Students - Free Technology for Teachers

Made From History is a Must-bookmark for History Teachers and Students - Free Technology for Teachers | Purposeful Pedagogy | Scoop.it

Via Maria Margarida Correia, Suvi Salo
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Discussion: Changing Roles In Teaching & Learning

Discussion: Changing Roles In Teaching & Learning | Purposeful Pedagogy | Scoop.it
Discussion: Changing Roles In Teaching & Learning

Via Grant Montgomery
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The Fallacy of ‘Balanced Literacy’ (Students Craved Instruction More Than Freedom)

The Fallacy of ‘Balanced Literacy’ (Students Craved Instruction More Than Freedom) | Purposeful Pedagogy | Scoop.it
My struggling students craved instruction far more than freedom.

Via Linda Alexander
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Linda Alexander's curator insight, July 7, 10:37 AM

A one-size-fits-all instructional strategy in public education is flat out wrong.  As implied, we tend to swing the instructional pendulum too far in a certain direction. Indeed self-directed learning is quite effective  in certain school environments, but this is not always the case, nor should an independent learning approach be the sole strategy used.  Teachers still need to "teach" at times....

 

A thoughtful essay where this teacher  claims, "My students craved instruction far more than freedom. Expecting children to independently discover the rules of written language is like expecting them to independently discover the rules of differential calculus".

 

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Miss L's Whole Brain Teaching

Miss L's Whole Brain Teaching | Purposeful Pedagogy | Scoop.it
A teaching blog about making learning relevant and meaningful for your students. Posts are devoted to educational resources and teaching.

Via John Purificati
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The Science of Attention (And Why eLearning Professionals Should Care)

The Science of Attention (And Why eLearning Professionals Should Care) | Purposeful Pedagogy | Scoop.it

"Paying attention is a task people take for granted; they rarely stop to think about the complex neurocognitive processes involved. However, it is an important topic for eLearning developers who are often so concerned about the superficial elements of their courses and neglect to learn how the brain works. After all, paying attention is the first step in the learning process, so ensuring learners pay attention is fundamental."


Via EDTC@UTB, WebTeachers
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Ivon Prefontaine's curator insight, July 4, 12:35 PM

All teachers, online and offline, should check regularly and determine whether students are attending to what is being learning.

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Looking for Online Professional Development? New Courses by PLP Will Help You - EdTechReview™ (ETR)

Looking for Online Professional Development? New Courses by PLP Will Help You - EdTechReview™ (ETR) | Purposeful Pedagogy | Scoop.it
8 new courses to kick off your summer and school year!

Via EdTechReview (@etr_in)
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Learning with Joy & Imagination: LEGO-Ashoka Challenge

Learning with Joy & Imagination: LEGO-Ashoka Challenge | Purposeful Pedagogy | Scoop.it

In a recent keynote, Anabel Jensen, Six Seconds’ President, asked participants to imagine Rip Van Winkle — what if he fell asleep in 1914 and awakened in 2014.  The world would seem dramatically different… until he walked into a classroom.  There he’d most likely see children sitting quietly in rows, directed by the teacher, preparing for a test.  In today’s world, is that still the right model?

In the face of critical and complex challenges, we believe that children and young people need to better develop creativity, imaginative problem-solving, teamwork, empathy, and inspiration so they can step into leadership roles in pursuit of purpose.  Here’s an amazing project to fuel this kind of joyful+powerful learning: The LEGO/Ashoka Play2Learn challenge.


Via David Hain, Lynnette Van Dyke
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David Hain's curator insight, July 4, 3:04 AM

Imagination and play are central to innovation, #play to learn, via @eqjosh.

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Can we read with our ears?

Can we read with our ears? | Purposeful Pedagogy | Scoop.it

Many students with weak decoding skills can read: with their ears. As teachers, we can make a strategic choice of differentiating in our lessons in order to allow a poor reader to ‘read with their ears’ in class until the time they can read with their eyes. As long as this occurs alongside additional intervention to address their decoding difficulties, we may be improving his or her life chances by providing this opportunity.


Via Nik Peachey, Yuly Asencion
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Frances's curator insight, July 3, 9:22 AM

Using all the resources available to us, while we systematically teach children the skills they need.

Ruby Rennie Panter's curator insight, July 4, 6:08 AM

An interesting article - relevant to literacy skills and accessibility. Helping pupils to be able to access the curriculum despite poor reading skills seems to be a no-brainer.

Randy Kulman's curator insight, July 4, 7:27 AM

reading is reading!

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Happy Teaching, Happy Learning: 13 Secrets to Finland's Success

Happy Teaching, Happy Learning: 13 Secrets to Finland's Success | Purposeful Pedagogy | Scoop.it
When Sophia Faridi visited several schools in Finland, students and teachers seemed happier than students and teachers in the U.S.

Via Maria Lopez Alvarado, MBA
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8 steps to get the most out of adaptive learning

8 steps to get the most out of adaptive learning | Purposeful Pedagogy | Scoop.it
Adaptive learning, considered a ‘game changer’ for higher education in its innovative use of technology to deliver high-quality, highly-personalized instruction to all types of learners, is still relatively new in its adoption and implementation.

Via Becky Roehrs
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The Difference Between Praise and Feedback - Mind/Shift

The Difference Between Praise and Feedback - Mind/Shift | Purposeful Pedagogy | Scoop.it
Parenting these days is patrolled by the language police. Sometimes it seems like the worst thing you could ever say to a kid is “Good job!” or the dreaded, “Good girl!” Widely popularized psychological research warns about the “inverse power of praise” and the importance of “unconditional parenting.” What are these researchers really getting at? Are the particular words we use to talk to our kids so important? And how do we convey positive feelings without negative consequences?

Via John Evans, Lynnette Van Dyke
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Ivon Prefontaine's curator insight, July 2, 1:35 PM

Feedback is necessary in the growth of children and adults. Sometimes it is praise that is involved and other times it is about correction. Feedback is more than broad general statements about doing a good or bad job, but is specific to the task at hand. Pedagogues, parents and teachers alike, have to be aware that they are not manipulating when they use feedback. The feedback has to be directed towards growth and forming in the human being.

Vilma Bonilla's curator insight, July 3, 9:51 AM

Feedback needs to be practical and useful in order to actually help an individual improve. This takes effort but it shows you care. It is fine to incorporate praise in feedback as well as your perspective on specific areas of improvement. The goal is to inspire and motivate action based on careful observation.

 

Delivering good, valuable feedback takes time and practice. It can be a powerful and influential tool to motivate and inspire behavioral change.

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How To Build Your Professional Learning Community - Edudemic

How To Build Your Professional Learning Community - Edudemic | Purposeful Pedagogy | Scoop.it
Professional development used to mean one thing: inservice days. Oof. We sure have come a long way, haven’t we? Especially in the realm of connecting with other like-minded individuals around the globe. We’re no longer limited by what is offered geographically nearby, so we can get into what really interests us as educators, even if …

Via Jim Lerman
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Mayra.Loves.Books's curator insight, July 2, 9:10 AM

This is one infographic that perfectly sums it up. One problem: conferences are way beyond a lot of folks' means. Oh, how I wish I could have attended ISTE !

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Wildlife Aid Education | free Primary science and related resources

A one-stop natural world resource bank of lesson plans, activities and projects for school and home. In our easy to navigate teaching materials section we are providing over 100 free original lesson plans, including worksheets, film, sound and animation clips, giving you everything you need to teach the new Primary Science curriculum. In addition we will be including a range of cross-curricular ideas and resources,


Via Karen Bonanno
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Karen Bonanno's curator insight, July 1, 5:00 PM

Bringing nature into the classroom