Purposeful Pedagogy
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Purposeful Pedagogy
An online library of effective teaching techniques and methodologies which inspire enduring and meaningful learning.
Curated by Dean J. Fusto
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Socratic Questioning: 30 Thought-Provoking Questions to Ask Your Students - InformED

Socratic Questioning: 30 Thought-Provoking Questions to Ask Your Students - InformED | Purposeful Pedagogy | Scoop.it

"Over a decade ago, cognitive scientists John D. Bransford and Daniel J. Schwartz asked fifth graders and college students to create a recovery plan to to protect bald eagles from extinction. Surprisingly, the two groups came up with plans of similar quality (although the college students had better spelling skills)."


Via Beth Dichter
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Susan C. Freeman's curator insight, November 8, 11:50 AM

This article is terrific. However, James says the apple falling is a myth. What say you?

Ivon Prefontaine's curator insight, November 8, 11:59 AM

As long as the questions do not circle back to one right answer then critical thinking is used. Too often, questioning is brought back to the one right answer rather than exploring the questions from the many perspectives in the classroom.

 

@ivon_ehd1

Susan Hall's curator insight, November 9, 9:28 AM

This is great for PBL questioning.

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4 Phases of Inquiry-Based Learning: A Guide For Teachers

4 Phases of Inquiry-Based Learning: A Guide For Teachers | Purposeful Pedagogy | Scoop.it

"According to Indiana University Bloomington, Inquiry-based learning is an “instructional model that centers learning on a solving a particular problem or answering a central question. There are several different inquiry-based learning models, but most have several general elements in common..."


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Beth Dichter's curator insight, October 12, 2013 7:20 PM

This indepth post explores inquiry-based learning. The four phases are:

1. Interaction - Big Idea: Dive into engaging, relevant, and credible media forms to identify a “need” or opportunity for inquiry

2. Clarification - Big Idea: Summarizing, paraphrasing, and categorizing learning with teacher or expert support

3. Questioning - Big Idea: Asking questions to drive continued, self-directed inquiry

4. Design - Big Idea: Designing an accessible, relevant, and curiosity-driven action or product to culminate and justify inquiry

Each of the four phases also includes information on tones, student indicators, teacher indicators, appropriate questions and apps.

There are also 4 questions for student-based reflection and ten adjustments you may make as a teacher to adjust to teaching inquiry-based learning.

There are many forms of teaching that incorporate inquiry-based learning including project-based learning, blended learning, and challenge-based learning. You may find your students more engaged in the learning process if you include some components of inquiry-based learning in your classroom.

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For Students, Why the Question is More Important Than the Answer

For Students, Why the Question is More Important Than the Answer | Purposeful Pedagogy | Scoop.it
In a traditional classroom, the teacher is the center of attention, the owner of knowledge and information.

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Mikko Hakala's curator insight, January 3, 3:16 PM

This is an interesting inverted Socratic method to consider. Why only the teacher should do the questioning?

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Learning Science Through Inquiry | Visual.ly

Learning Science Through Inquiry | Visual.ly | Purposeful Pedagogy | Scoop.it
Children can learn problem-solving skills using methods similar to the ones scientists employ to prepare them for opportunities in their professional

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Beth Dichter's curator insight, October 2, 2013 8:03 PM

This infographic looks at science,specifically the value of teaching students science from a young age because of the many skills that are developed. These skills include developing questions, collecting evidence, forming decisions, constructing information and communicating. It also discusses the FERA cycle, as in:

* Focus

* Explore

* Reflect

* Apply

The infographic then explores how STEM has the ability to impact her choices throughout her lifetime. This infographic was created by the Smithsonian and provides great information throughout (including a more detailed explanation of the FERA cycle).

Kathy Lynch's curator insight, October 5, 2013 3:34 PM

from iScience Teacher