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Rescooped by Susan Fiasconaro from Social Neuroscience
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The interactive brain hypothesis

The hypothesis states that interactive experience and skills play enabling roles in both the development and current function of social brain mechanisms, even in cases where social understanding happens in the absence of immediate interaction


Via Benjamín Villasana
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Rescooped by Susan Fiasconaro from LEARNING AND COGNITION
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Cracking a Secret Code to Learning: Hand Gestures

Cracking a Secret Code to Learning: Hand Gestures | Teaching and Lifelong Learning | Scoop.it
Research shows that the act of gesturing itself seems to accelerate learning, bringing nascent knowledge into consciousness and aiding the understanding of new concepts

 

There is a new conceptualization of intelligence that takes shape in the social and biological sciences. This conceptualization involves many lines of inquiry that can be loosely grouped under the title situated cognition: the idea that thinking doesn’t happen in some abstract, disembodied space, but always in a particular brain, in a particular body, located in a particular social and physical world. The moment-by-moment conditions that prevail in that brain, that body, and that world powerfully affect how well we think and perform.

 

One of the most interesting lines of inquiry within this perspective is known as embodied cognition: the recognition that our bodies play a big role in how we think. Physical gestures, for example, constitute a kind of back-channel way of expressing and even working out our thoughts. Research demonstrates that the movements we make with our hands when we talk constitute a kind of second language, adding information that’s absent from our words. It’s learning’s secret code: Gesture reveals what we know. It reveals what we don’t know. And it reveals (as Donald Rumsfeld might put it) what we know, but don’t yet know we know. What’s more, the congruence—or lack of congruence—between what our voices say and how our hands move offers a clue to our readiness to learn.


Via Huey O'Brien
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Huey O'Brien's curator insight, June 25, 2013 7:48 AM

IMPLICATION:  Embodied Cognition, Situated Cognition

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The Mystery of Memory - Media Player at Nobelprize.org

The Mystery of Memory - Media Player at Nobelprize.org | Teaching and Lifelong Learning | Scoop.it
Nobelprize.org, The Official Web Site of the Nobel Prize...
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Rescooped by Susan Fiasconaro from Social Neuroscience
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The interactive brain hypothesis

The hypothesis states that interactive experience and skills play enabling roles in both the development and current function of social brain mechanisms, even in cases where social understanding happens in the absence of immediate interaction


Via Benjamín Villasana
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Rescooped by Susan Fiasconaro from Common Core Oklahoma
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Oklahoma State Department of Education: Writing Rubrics for Transition to the CCSS.

These rubrics will be used for the 5th and 8th grade writing tests this February.


Via Brook Grove Meiller, Connie Wise
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Rescooped by Susan Fiasconaro from 21 century education
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Should We Connect School Life to Real Life?

Should We Connect School Life to Real Life? | Teaching and Lifelong Learning | Scoop.it

Excerpted from Will Richardson's new TED Book Why School:  How Education Must Change When Learning and Information Are Everywhere.  Mindshift


Via Pippa Davies @PippaDavies
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Rescooped by Susan Fiasconaro from Learning, Brain & Cognitive Fitness
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Inside the Letterbox: How Literacy Transforms the Human Brain - Dana Foundation

Inside the Letterbox: How Literacy Transforms the Human Brain - Dana Foundation | Teaching and Lifelong Learning | Scoop.it

Editor’s note: Few issues are as important to the future of humanity as acquiring literacy. Brain-scanning technology and cognitive tests on a variety of subjects by one of the world’s foremost cognitive neuroscientists has led to a better understanding of how a region of the brain responds to visual stimuli. The results could profoundly affect learning and help individuals with reading disabilities


Via Maggie Rouman
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Rescooped by Susan Fiasconaro from How learning happens
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Brain researchers explain why old habits die hard - MIT News Office

Brain researchers explain why old habits die hard - MIT News Office | Teaching and Lifelong Learning | Scoop.it
#Brain Researchers Explain Why Old #Habits Die Hard http://t.co/fmrWeJNq (via @MITnews) #science #neuro #neuroscience...

Via IdeaLearning Group
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Rescooped by Susan Fiasconaro from Cognitive Neuroscience
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How attention helps you remember - MIT News Office

How attention helps you remember - MIT News Office | Teaching and Lifelong Learning | Scoop.it
New study finds long-overlooked cells help the brain respond to visual stimuli.

Via Sandeep Gautam
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Rescooped by Susan Fiasconaro from Brain-based learning
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Learnlets » The third goal of learning

Learnlets » The third goal of learning | Teaching and Lifelong Learning | Scoop.it

"Formally, our goals for learning interventions should be retention over time until needed and transfer to all appropriate situations (and no inappropriate ones). And these are important goals."  A third goal is also important - learner confidence. It's a "desirable, maybe even necessary outcome of any really successful learning."


Via IdeaLearning Group, Katherine Stevens
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Rescooped by Susan Fiasconaro from Open Education 1
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Smarter Curation, Genius Content. — Spundge

Smarter Curation, Genius Content. Spundge is the end-to-end tool for today's power curator. Connect with the best content creators on the web. Collaboratively curate the web and create relevant, influential content.

Via Yves Simon
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