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Questions Before Answers: What Drives a Great Lesson?

Questions Before Answers: What Drives a Great Lesson? | teaching and technology | Scoop.it
Students engage more passionately when trying to answer a question that interests them. Here are ten opening questions that have inspired this kind of learning.

Via Tom D'Amico (@TDOttawa)
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Linda Alexander's curator insight, December 27, 2014 10:16 AM

A few of the questions collected here are laugh-out-loud funny!

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10 Things That Learners Pay Attention To (And How to Use Them in eLearning)

10 Things That Learners Pay Attention To (And How to Use Them in eLearning) | teaching and technology | Scoop.it

"Even more than other types of education, eLearning must struggle to attract learners' attention: the Internet is full of distractions, and adult learners are both busier and more free to indulge in distractions. Helping students to pay attention is a primary concern of training professionals, so here are some optimal methods to win the attention game in eLearning."


Via Beth Dichter
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Audrey's curator insight, October 3, 2014 1:26 PM

These are certainly true.  Have a look at www.hotmoodle.com

 

Bernard VULLIERME's curator insight, October 20, 2014 5:30 AM

Rien de nouveau sous le soleil du bon e:enseignant, mais plus d'exigences …

clare o'shea's curator insight, February 5, 1:49 PM

and ask indviduals questions every 2-3 minutes - but always label the behaviour first! so it is a positive experience not a catching out!!

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5 Powerful Questions Teachers Can Ask Students

5 Powerful Questions Teachers Can Ask Students | teaching and technology | Scoop.it

Via Beth Dichter
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Beth Dichter's curator insight, January 2, 2014 5:19 PM

Here is a visual that may help your students with critical thinking skills. The post in Edutopia provides addtional information on this and the image came via twitter and that link is at the end of this post.

As you read the five questions you may find that might change a few. For example, if you are working with younger students you might want to change the first question to "What do you think you know?" and you might also want to change the fourth question to "What more can you tell me?"

Do you have other ideas? Share them by adding a comment.

The link to the visual is at https://twitter.com/shannonclark7/status/404336242625892354/photo/1/large

PCGS_rEDUcation's curator insight, January 5, 2014 8:45 AM

A_sking

W_orks!

E_mpowering

S_imple

O_ld

M_odern

E_asy!

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15 Questions To Help Students Respond To New Ideas

15 Questions To Help Students Respond To New Ideas | teaching and technology | Scoop.it

"It just might be that in a society where information is abundant, thinking habits are more important than knowledge. Somewhere beneath wisdom and above the “things” a student knows.

Laws of economics say that scarcity increases value. It’s no longer information that’s scarce, but rather meaningful response to that information. Thought.

And thought has a source–a complex set of processes, background knowledge, and schema that we can, as educators think of as cognitive habits. And if they’re habits, well, that means they’re probably something we can practice at, doesn’t it?"


Via Beth Dichter
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Beth Dichter's curator insight, September 8, 2014 10:09 PM

We want our students to demonstrate that they know how to think, to understand that they have the ability to ask questions and find answers, answers that may not be available through Google (esp. if we are asking them to research). In short, we want them to use metacognitive skills.

But how do we teach them these skils? The image above, from teachthought, provides 15 questions that may help students create the habits that students need to learn. Below are three of the questions. Click through to the post for the entire list, as well as some great discussion.

* Is this idea important to me? To others? Why or why not?

* Is there a “part” of this new idea I can take and “pivot”? Create something new and fresh?

* What real-world models–examples–relate to this that can help me understand this further?

Consider posting these questions in your classroom and using them when appropriate with students.

Bronwyn Burke's curator insight, September 18, 2014 5:50 PM

Thinking and questioning, the more the better. Engaging with new information and building curiosity.

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Upgrade your KWL Chart to the 21st Century

Upgrade your KWL Chart to the 21st Century | teaching and technology | Scoop.it
One of the take aways from the Curriculum Mapping Institute this past week was that it brought an upgrade to THE trusted KWL (Know, What to Know and Learned) Chart to the forefront. It seems a no b...

Via Beth Dichter
The Rice Process's insight:

Taking the KWL chart to the next level.

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Beth Dichter's curator insight, April 23, 2014 9:57 PM

Not too long ago I posted an article that suggested we move from the KWL chart to the KWHL chart...and here is another post that suggests we make it more in-depth by adding the letters A and Q.

What do all these letters stand for?

K - What do I know?

W - What do I want to know?

H - How do I find out?

L - What have I learned?

A - What action will I take?

Q - What new questions do I have?

More in-depth discussions of these new letters are included in the post.

Kate JohnsonMcGregor's curator insight, April 24, 2014 8:43 AM

I love this idea - it fits beautifully with the concept of Inquiry-based learning and students assuming ownership of the research process - Yay ACTION! The idea that learning and research are ongoing - and active - is a key element to new learning models. Very exciting!