Montessori Education
998 views | +1 today
Follow
Montessori Education
Your new post is loading...
Your new post is loading...
Rescooped by The Rice Process from Eclectic Technology
Scoop.it!

What’s Going on Inside the Brain Of A Curious Child?

What’s Going on Inside the Brain Of A Curious Child? | Montessori Education | Scoop.it
New research suggests that curiosity triggers chemical changes in the brain that help students better understand and retain information.

Via Beth Dichter
more...
Aurore A.N Beaini's comment, October 28, 2014 10:26 AM
http://blogs.kqed.org/mindshift/2013/04/how-to-stimulate-curiosity/
Aurore A.N Beaini's comment, October 28, 2014 10:28 AM
I think your post is very interesting for children anyway, it's also useful for mothers
Rescooped by The Rice Process from Eclectic Technology
Scoop.it!

How the Brain Learns—A Super Simple Explanation

How the Brain Learns—A Super Simple Explanation | Montessori Education | Scoop.it
eLearning professionals should learn more about the biological basis of learning. Check out this simple explanation.

Via Beth Dichter
more...
Chris Carter's curator insight, June 24, 2014 7:35 PM

This is your brain ... this is your brain when it learns.

Betty Skeet's curator insight, September 1, 2014 6:54 AM

We need to know more about how the brain works in the learning process so that eLearning can be more effective.

Shawn Wright's curator insight, September 6, 2014 9:14 PM

Cool

Rescooped by The Rice Process from Eclectic Technology
Scoop.it!

6 Targets To Teach The Way The Brain Learns

6 Targets To Teach The Way The Brain Learns | Montessori Education | Scoop.it

"When you’re standing in front of a classroom of students who’re not quite sure they even want to be in your class, much less pay attention to what’s being said, things like neuroscience, research studies, and teaching the way the brain learns are an abstraction.

Yet, brain-targeted teaching can engage and excite students because it taps into factors that stimulate the brain, grab the attention, and set the stage for learning."


Via Beth Dichter
more...
Nicole Wallace's curator insight, March 19, 2014 12:57 AM

Great comments in here and how it links to neurobiology.

Helen Teague's curator insight, March 19, 2014 12:48 PM
strong>Referencing Beth Dichter's insight:What if we were able to design our curriculum to support the way the brain learns? Would our students be more engaged in class? Learn about this new model, Teach the Way the Brain Learns, in this post. There is a short discussion about some of the concepts as well as six brain targets, each of which includes a brief neuroscience explanation as well as a "translation" so that you will understand how to implement each target in your classroom. What are some of the targets? Brain Target 1: Establish the emotional climate for learning What does this mean? "Stress impedes learning." Make connections with students and then begin the lesson. Brain Target 2: Creating the Physical Learning Environment What does this mean? The physical space impacts our students. Changing the space may help them learn. What changes could you make in your classroom? Four additional brain targets are provided. You may also want to check out the website Brain Targeted Teaching (http://www.braintargetedteaching.org/) where you will find additional information as well as sample units that utilize this method (and a template to create your own lessons).
James J. Goldsmith's curator insight, July 28, 2014 3:29 PM

Six practical suggestions for applying neuroscience in the classroom.

Rescooped by The Rice Process from Eclectic Technology
Scoop.it!

5 Practical Learning Tips Based On How People Do--And Don't--Learn

5 Practical Learning Tips Based On How People Do--And Don't--Learn | Montessori Education | Scoop.it

"There has been a large body of work in neuroscience, psychology, and related fields offering more and more insight into how we learn.

Below are five of the top tips from Barbara Oakley, Professor of Engineering at Oakland University, who has faced her own learning challenges (failing middle and high school math and science classes), and has made a study of the latest research on learning. She is also offering a free online course, Learning How to Learn, which starts August 1 on the Coursera platform with co-instructor, Prof. Terrence Sejnowski, a computational neuroscientist at UC San Diego and the Salk Institute."


Via Beth Dichter
more...
Beth Dichter's curator insight, July 30, 2014 6:02 AM

Are you interested in learning how to learn? This post provides 5 tips that may help you.

1. Get enough sleep to de-toxify your brain

2. Outwit procrastination with the Pomodoro technique

3. Use spaced repetition to remember key facts

4. Use recall rather than re-reading to see whether you’ve learned the content

5. Vary learning/studying environment

Each of these is explained in more detail in the post.

As teachers we are also learners, and it is never too late to become better at learning. Sharing these five tips with our students may help them become better learners. And if this is a topic of interest to you, consider checking out the Coursera course Learning How to Learn that will begin on August 1st.

James J. Goldsmith's curator insight, July 30, 2014 11:27 AM

Five practical and sometimes infrequently used ideas to enhance learning.

Rescooped by The Rice Process from Teaching + Learning + Policy
Scoop.it!

This Is Your Brain On Literature

This Is Your Brain On Literature | Montessori Education | Scoop.it

"Research shows that reading rich narratives and metaphors activates areas of our brain outside of language, and frequent fiction reading is correlated with empathy. Brain scans are revealing what happens in our heads when we read a detailed description, an evocative metaphor or an emotional exchange between characters. Stories, this research is showing, stimulate the brain and even change how we act in life. The brain, it seems, does not make much of a distinction between reading about an experience and encountering it in real life; in each case, the same neurological regions are stimulated." | by Amir Aczel


Via Todd Reimer
more...
Lynnette Van Dyke's curator insight, April 28, 2014 11:38 AM

From time.com - Today, 9:56 AM
This Is Your Brain on Great Literature
TIME

These findings will affirm the experience of readers who have felt illuminated and instructed by a novel, who have found themselves comparing a plucky young woman to Elizabeth Bennet or a tiresome pedant to Edward Casaubon. Reading great literature, it has long been averred, enlarges and improves us as human beings. Brain science shows this claim is truer than we imagined.

Rescooped by The Rice Process from Eclectic Technology
Scoop.it!

Neuroeducation: 25 Findings Over 25 Years - InformED

Neuroeducation: 25 Findings Over 25 Years - InformED | Montessori Education | Scoop.it

"It’s been 25 years since the field of neuroeducation first reared its head in academia...To celebrate the progress of this monumental discipline, we have compiled a list of the 25 most significant findings in neuroscience education over the past 25 years."


Via Beth Dichter
more...
Beth Dichter's curator insight, November 25, 2013 9:48 PM

What does neurology tell us about education? This post looks at 25 discoveries over the last 25 years. Some may be new to you and remember this is a field that is changing rapidly.

Below are a few of the discoveries that are covered.

* Brain plasticity - "...the brain changes constantly as a result of learning, and remains ‘plastic’ throughout life."

* "The brain’s response to reward is influenced by expectations and uncertainty."

* "Learning involves both focused attention and peripheral attention."

For more information on these discoveries and 22 additional click through to the post. You might want to check out the 3D interactive brain that explores learning strategies. It is located at http://www.opencolleges.edu.au/informed/learning-strategies/

Miloš Bajčetić's curator insight, November 26, 2013 1:57 AM

Some of them:

- Brain plasticity

- The discovery of mirror neurons

- Both nature and nurture affect the learning brain

- Gardner’s Theory of Multiple Intelligences- The brain’s response to reward is influenced by expectations and uncertainty- The brain has mechanisms for self-regulation- Education is a powerful form of cognitive enhancement- Neuroscience informs adaptive learning technology- Dyslexia and other learning disorders- Social and emotional intelligence- The brain thrives on variety- Memorization and learning are not the same thing- Metacognition enhances learning- The brain is a parallel processor.- “Cells that fire together wire together.”etc
Lee Hall's curator insight, November 26, 2013 2:35 PM

Make sure you click the link to see the interactive brain, too.