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8 Myths That Undermine Educational Effectiveness

8 Myths That Undermine Educational Effectiveness | Montessori Education | Scoop.it

"Certain widely-shared myths and lies about education are destructive for all of us as educators, and destructive for our educational institutions. This is the subject of 50 Myths & Lies That Threaten America’s Public Schools: The Real Crisis in Education, a new book by David Berliner and Gene Glass, two of the country’s most highly respected educational researchers. Although the book deserves to be read in its entirety, I want to focus on eight of the myths that I think are relevant to most teachers, administrators, and parents." | by Mark Phillips

 


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What is Learning Analytics? – Infographic

What is Learning Analytics? – Infographic | Montessori Education | Scoop.it

"Learning Analytics is the measurement, collection, analysis and reporting of data about learners and their contexts, for purposes of understanding and optimizing learning and the environments in which it occurs."


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Jan MacWatters's curator insight, July 20, 2014 1:51 PM

This is definitely something that has piqued my interest to read more. about this topic..

Kiruthika Ragupathi's curator insight, July 20, 2014 7:47 PM

a simple but useful infographic!

John Lemos Forman's curator insight, July 20, 2014 10:55 PM

Muita expectativa mas ainda poucos resultados concretos ... De qualquer modo, esta se formando uma percepção de que o modelo educacional vai ser fortemente impactado nos próximos anos

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How The Languages We Speak Can Affect The Way We Think

How The Languages We Speak Can Affect The Way We Think | Montessori Education | Scoop.it

"Is there a connection between language and how we think and behave? In particular, Chen wanted to know: does our language affect our economic decisions? Chen designed a study to look at how language might affect individual’s ability to save for the future. According to his results, it does — big time. But that’s only the beginning. There’s a wide field of research on the link between language and both psychology and behavior." | by Jessica Gross


Via Todd Reimer
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Interesting! A notion we all should embrace-langauge shapes behavior.

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Teaching Students to Embrace Their Mistakes

Teaching Students to Embrace Their Mistakes | Montessori Education | Scoop.it

"Telling students they need to take advantage of the feedback they get isn't just good advice -- it's established science. In the last few decades, researchers have discovered a lot about how people become experts. The main idea, made popular by everyone from author Malcolm Gladwell to rapper Macklemore, is the 10,000-hour rule. Ten thousand is the number of hours it takes to become an expert in almost any field. While it's wonderful that people are starting to understand how work leads to expertise, the most important part of that research is not how much practice someone needs to perform, but what kind of practice. This latter category is called deliberate practice and involves isolating what's not working and mastering the difficult area before moving on. Picture a classical violinist rehearsing. He or she would not play a new piece start-to-finish, fudging through tricky sections and trying to "be done." That musician stops in trouble spots, figures them out, and then plays that measure over and over again, and only moves on when it's perfect. The same principle applies to schoolwork. Mistakes are the most important thing that happens in any classroom, because they tell you where to focus that deliberate practice." | by Hunter Maats & Katie O'Brien

 


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Elizabeth Burrage's curator insight, October 26, 2014 9:43 AM

Making mistakes is essentail if we are to learn. We need to help our students understand this.

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The Gift of Failure: The Crucial Difference Between Success and Mastery

The Gift of Failure: The Crucial Difference Between Success and Mastery | Montessori Education | Scoop.it

"'You gotta be willing to fail… if you’re afraid of failing, you won’t get very far,' Steve Jobs cautioned. How, then, can we transcend that mental block, that existential worry, that keeps us from the very capacity for creative crash that keeps us growing and innovating? That’s precisely what curator and art advocate Sarah Lewis, who has under her belt degrees from Harvard and Oxford, curatorial positions at the Tate Modern and the MoMA, and an appointment on President Obama’s Arts Policy Committee, examines in The Rise: Creativity, the Gift of Failure, and the Search for Mastery (public library) — an exploration of how 'discoveries, innovations, and creative endeavors often, perhaps even only, come from uncommon ground' and why this 'improbable ground of creative endeavor' is an enormous source of advantages on the path to self-actualization and fulfillment, brought to life through a tapestry of tribulations turned triumphs by such diverse modern heroes as legendary polar explorer Captain Scott, dance icon Paul Taylor, and pioneering social reformer Frederick Douglass." | by Maria Popova

 


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A Message From Your Brain: I'm Not Good At Remembering What I Hear

A Message From Your Brain: I'm Not Good At Remembering What I Hear | Montessori Education | Scoop.it

"A new study shows that we are far better at remembering what we see and touch than what we hear."


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Beth Dichter's curator insight, March 12, 2014 9:16 PM

How do we learn best? This is a critical question for educators to understand and to keep up-to-date with research, and this post from the National Geographic looks at new research that shows that our auditory memory is not as robust as our visual and tactile memory.

Much more information is available in the post but the shorthand is that having students engage as many senses as possible is the best way for us to reach our learners!

David Baker's curator insight, March 13, 2014 4:33 PM

Important to remember that we structure classrooms to support learning.

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8 Types of Technology That Will Be Essential in the 2015 Workplace

8 Types of Technology That Will Be Essential in the 2015 Workplace | Montessori Education | Scoop.it

"If technology continues to evolve at the current rate, the 2015 workplace could look quite different from today's office spaces -- and may even involve less traditional office space with the rise of telecommuting. From a company's hiring process to sharing knowledge with employees, technology has the ability to change the way we all work.

 

What technology will be essential in the 2015 workplace, but doesn't exist yet?" from: http://www.huffingtonpost.com

 

NOTE: This short post has 8 thought worthy services and technology that would prove mighty helpful in this digital world that is more complex every day. I like the info for "Learning Academies to Keep Up With New Knowledge" (aka Lifelong Learning).


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Frederic Hohl's curator insight, February 6, 2014 6:26 AM

What your working place might look in 2015?

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10 Commandments of Innovative Teaching - A.J. Juliani

10 Commandments of Innovative Teaching - A.J. Juliani | Montessori Education | Scoop.it
What is innovative teaching? The answer is always changing. Here's a list of ways we can innovate while technology, standards, and content all change.

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Juan Legarda's curator insight, February 12, 2014 6:26 PM

Creative Teaching is about daily innovation.

Etd6's curator insight, February 17, 2014 3:19 AM
Test
Vatormabalissa Ratajczyk's curator insight, May 20, 2014 11:49 AM

Ensenar con technologia es dificil si no sepas usarlo. Profesors ayudaria estudiantes mas si ellos poden usar mas technologia. 

 

Ratajczyk, T

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10 Social Media Skills for The 21st Century Teachers | Educational Technology and Mobile Learning

10 Social Media Skills for The 21st Century Teachers | Educational Technology and Mobile Learning | Montessori Education | Scoop.it

The potential of social networking sites in education is huge and we need to capitalize on it to enhance our professional development and consequently improve the quality of our instruction. Searching for articles on this topic , I came across Doug Johnson's post on the 10 social media competencies for teachers [http://doug-johnson.squarespace.com/blue-skunk-blog/2010/7/31/top-ten-social-media-competencies-for-teachers.html ]. I like the competencies Doug included and decided to make an infographic featuring all of these skills.  Have a look and share with your colleagues.


Via Elizabeth E Charles, Sarah McElrath, Jim Lerman, Ivon Prefontaine, PhD
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Epict Italia's curator insight, January 25, 2014 3:47 AM

Le competenze del docente che usa strumenti "Social"
1) Aiutare gli studenti a utilizzare gli strumeti di betworking per trovare informazioni e comunicare in rete con esperti, pari, docenti
2) Conoscere le principali categorier del Web 2.0 e gli strmenti utili per la didattica. COnoscere gli sturmenti a disposizione e utilizzabili nella propria scuola
3) Utilizzare strumenti di rete per comunicare con i colleghi, studenti e genitori
4) Navigare, valutare e creare contenuti su siti social (prezi, slideshaer,..)
5) Utilizzare gli strumenti sociali per creare, mantenere e imparare in una personale rete di apprendmento
6) COnoscere le regle di netiquette e gli standard di comportamento eticon in rete
7) Conoscere e insegnare le regole sul copyright e le questioni di pricacy in rete
8) COmprendere e insegnare l'impolrtanza della gestione dell'identità e della reputazione in rete
9) Scegliere e seguire un personale piano di autoformazione per rimanere infomrato su nuovi strumenti e applicazioni
10) Partecipare nella definizione a livello di Scuola delle regole di utilizzo degli strumenti social

chua meng joo's curator insight, February 3, 2014 11:06 PM

For development of our teachers.

Jessica Cox's curator insight, November 8, 2015 10:31 AM

Social Networking

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Technology Tools for Reflection - Reflection for Learning

Technology Tools for Reflection - Reflection for Learning | Montessori Education | Scoop.it

A website to support Reflection in Education K-16 The following technologies can support reflection: web logs (‘blogs’) as reflective journals,  wikis as collaborative websites, digital storytelling/podcasting, Twitter and social networks.


Via Dennis T OConnor
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A reflective stance facilitates empowerment.

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Tim Hopper's curator insight, January 1, 2014 10:31 AM

I used this quote in my dissertation, got to love Dewey.

Mirta Liliana Filgueira's curator insight, January 1, 2014 11:23 AM

Herramientas para el aprendizaje.

Lori Wilk's curator insight, January 15, 2014 12:57 AM

I like the quote

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Updated Personalization vs. Differentiation vs. Individualization Chart Version 3

Updated Personalization vs. Differentiation vs. Individualization Chart Version 3 | Montessori Education | Scoop.it

From your feedback, we revised the chart so assessment AS, OF, and FOR learning was clarified for each of the terms. 


Individualization involves assessment OF learning. This is where summative assessment is grade-based and involves testing to confirm what learners know and do not know.

 

Differentiation involves assessment FOR learning and OF learning. This is assessment that involves time-based testing where teachers provide feedback to advance learning.

 

Personalization involves assessment AS learning, FOR learning, and a minimal OF learning. This is where teachers develop capacity so learners become independent learners who set goals, monitor progress, and reflect on learning. Assessments are based on mastery. 


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Barbara Bray's curator insight, December 3, 2013 5:17 PM

You can download this chart at  http://eepurl.com/fLJZM and our other free resources and will be asked to subscribe to our newsletter. For anyone who has already subscribed, we will be sending you a new url to download version 3 and any other updated resources. 

Ali Anani's curator insight, February 23, 2014 12:13 AM

With free downloads

Paula Silva's comment, March 4, 2014 12:23 AM
Will you check this scoop? Thank you so much. http://sco.lt/5okJ17
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So? So What? What Now? How To Keep The Learning Going

So? So What? What Now? How To Keep The Learning Going | Montessori Education | Scoop.it

"...in practice, curriculum maps are almost always not the “living, breathing” documents experts like Heidi Jacobs Hayes promote. They are instead very dead things—lifeless prisons of content to be covered, and boxes to be highlighted...For a curriculum map—or any planned learning experiences—to be vital—and vitally useful—they must be adaptive and circular rather than rigid and linear. ...they must encourage students to continue their pursuit of understanding and self-knowledge."


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Sue J Wilson's curator insight, November 25, 2013 10:32 AM

"...in practice, curriculum maps are almost always not the “living, breathing” documents experts like Heidi Jacobs Hayes promote. They are instead very dead things—lifeless prisons of content to be covered, and boxes to be highlighted...For a curriculum map—or any planned learning experiences—to be vital—and vitally useful—they must be adaptive and circular rather than rigid and linear. ...they must encourage students to continue their pursuit of understanding and self-knowledge."

Roberta Orlando's curator insight, November 26, 2013 9:01 AM

Interesting food for thought...worth reading ;)

Bradley Gomoluch's curator insight, July 29, 2015 3:55 PM

Some very helpful and useful information.  

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How We Make Progress

How We Make Progress | Montessori Education | Scoop.it
“Slipping back” isn’t a shameful retreat from our goal—it’s part of the process of getting there.

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Beth Dichter's curator insight, August 6, 2014 9:48 PM

In education we often use metaphors to help our students understand. Are we cognizant of how these metaphors may be interpreted by our students? Is it possible that the metaphors are "setting up false expectations and giving us a misleading impression of what’s going on."

Annie Paul Murphy discusses these ideas in this post. As teachers we are constantly teaching our students strategies, and the strategies are often scaffolded, but that does not mean that the students let go of the old strategies, and only use the new ones. The move back and forth, at times choosing the one that is a known friend rather than the new one.

Our language plays a critical role in our classroom, and this post reminds us that with school beginning soon in the US we must consider how our words may be impacting our students.

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10 Things That Learners Pay Attention To (And How to Use Them in eLearning)

10 Things That Learners Pay Attention To (And How to Use Them in eLearning) | Montessori Education | Scoop.it

"Even more than other types of education, eLearning must struggle to attract learners' attention: the Internet is full of distractions, and adult learners are both busier and more free to indulge in distractions. Helping students to pay attention is a primary concern of training professionals, so here are some optimal methods to win the attention game in eLearning."


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Audrey's curator insight, October 3, 2014 1:26 PM

These are certainly true.  Have a look at www.hotmoodle.com

 

Bernard VULLIERME's curator insight, October 20, 2014 5:30 AM

Rien de nouveau sous le soleil du bon e:enseignant, mais plus d'exigences …

clare o'shea's curator insight, February 5, 2015 1:49 PM

and ask indviduals questions every 2-3 minutes - but always label the behaviour first! so it is a positive experience not a catching out!!

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7 Ways Teaching Has Changed

7 Ways Teaching Has Changed | Montessori Education | Scoop.it

"Teachers are the arbitrators of knowledge and culture.

Knowledge and culture are each dynamic, endlessly crashing and churning.

This makes teaching significantly important and difficult work, and can leave teaching—as a craft—wide-eyed and nonplussed in response.

Worse, those outside the bubble of education can understandably struggle to understand the problem.

What are the teaching in those schools anyway? How is it any different from when I was in school?"


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Beth Dichter's curator insight, March 28, 2014 10:13 PM

How has teaching changed? Below are the seven key ideas. .

1. A culture of emerging literacies

2. A society that is mobile

3. A world where equity is a central theme

4. A society of constant connectivity

5. A world where the technology learns, too

6. A context that demands new credibility in an era of information

7. A culture that can seem, well, distracted

Many teachers may be overwhelmed with these changes and may require professional development to help them develop new skills that technology brings. But change has happened before and will continue to happen. The question is how are we adapting to the changes and how can we assist our students in becoming independent  learners in this new age of learning?

María Dolores Díaz Noguera's curator insight, March 29, 2014 9:09 AM

7 Ways Teaching Has Changed

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What’s the ‘Sweet Spot’ of Difficulty For Learning?

What’s the ‘Sweet Spot’ of Difficulty For Learning? | Montessori Education | Scoop.it

"Tom Hoerr leads the New City School, a private elementary school in St. Louis, Mo., that has been working on grit. ‘One of the sayings that you hear around here a great deal is, 'If our kids have graduated from here with nothing but success, then we have failed them, because they haven’t learned how to respond to frustration and failure,'‘ says Hoerr. After years of focusing on the theory known as ‘multiple intelligences’ and trying to teach kids in their own style, Hoerr says he’s now pulling kids out of their comfort zones intentionally. ‘The message is that life isn’t always easy,’ Hoerr says. His goal is to make sure ‘that no matter how talented [students are], they hit the wall, so they can learn to pick themselves up, hit the wall again and pick themselves up again, and ultimately persevere and succeed.’ But even putting the question of educational trends aside, the experience of principal Tom Hoerr as documented in the NPR segment brings up a question that parents and teachers wrestle with all the time: Should we be making learning easier for kids—or harder? The answer, according to research in cognitive science and psychology, is both." | by Annie Murphy Paul


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Heinrich Erasmus's curator insight, March 27, 2014 2:46 AM

This is a very interesting perspective on the current trend in the learning environment, whether it be primary, secondary or tertiary education. Like the article says towards the focus should remain on making education easy but harder. To clarify that statement, by making the education easier through proper education whether it be Multimedia or class room aspect. Another way to improve on making it easier is entertainment and group involvement just to name a few improvements. These variations in education style might be able to encourage more students to take on more difficult areas of study.

Ivon Prefontaine, PhD's curator insight, March 27, 2014 1:29 PM

What is interesting is that John Dewey and Alfred North Whitehead's work indicates learning is always be on the edge of where we are comfortable reaching into zones of discomfort. Some might call it an ecotone where the ecosystem is very fluid. It is the way we support students in these spaces that is important. They can fail with support and build resiliency. This means teachers living in relationship with children rather than just facilitating and observing.

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Overcoming the Fear of Being Wrong: 20 Ways To Help Your Students

Overcoming the Fear of Being Wrong: 20 Ways To Help Your Students | Montessori Education | Scoop.it

"Like cheating on a test, ignoring a friend’s phone call, wallowing in self-pity, or eating a pint of ice cream in one sitting, being wrong feels the worst when someone else is around to witness it. Unlike these things, being wrong is unjustly stigmatized as unacceptable. Everyone answers a question incorrectly now and then, but it’s the shame associated with being wrong, especially in front of others, that harms us more than the fault itself."


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Beth Dichter's curator insight, March 16, 2014 9:27 PM

Many students are afraid to fail. Therefore they may be afraid to try new things or to ask questions. Too often we may hear the words "I don't know" because the student may feel embarrassed if the give an incorrect answer. This post discusses this topic in some detail before it provides 20 suggestions on ways to work with students to help them overcome the fear of being wrong. Five of the suggestions are below. Additional information on each is in the post as well as fifteen additional suggestions.

* Learning has two definitions and one is failure.

* Always respond to an answer with more than No."

* Turn wrong answers into a learning experience for all.

* The "wrong" answer is often more educational than the "right" answer.

* Remember that everyone is wrong sometimes.

Nancy Jones's curator insight, March 18, 2014 2:48 PM

We will never grow if we don't make mistakes and then learn from them. I am sure Bill Gates and James Dyson would agree. Look up any interview with them as they talk about their products.

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We Should Let Learners Struggle

We Should Let Learners Struggle | Montessori Education | Scoop.it

"Allowing learners to struggle will actually help them learn better, according to research on “productive failure” conducted by Manu Kapur, a researcher at the Learning Sciences Lab at the National Institute of Education of Singapore. Kapur’s investigations find that while the model adopted by many teachers and employers when introducing others to new knowledge—providing lots of structure and guidance early on, until the students or workers show that they can do it on their own—makes intuitive sense, it’s not the best way to promote learning. Rather, it’s better to let neophytes wrestle with the material on their own for a while, refraining from giving them any assistance at the start." | by Annie Murphy Paul


Via Todd Reimer
The Rice Process's insight:

Meaningful learning is achieved through engagement, unpacking one's thinking, sharing and evaluating.  The notion of learning is considered a process, so many different mental activities should be happening.  A better word choice for "struggle" is to work hard. Students on't need to work to a level of frustration.  Work produces its own rewards.

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Critical Thinking: Educating Competent Citizens

Critical Thinking: Educating Competent Citizens | Montessori Education | Scoop.it

"Critical thought is a cognitive process that proposes the systematic analysis of information, opinion and statements that we accept in our daily life as valid or true. It is a basic skill for a competent, free and responsible citizen."


Via Beth Dichter
The Rice Process's insight:

Excellent!  Thank you.

Critical thinking encourages individuals to work interdependently.  The sharing of ideas and resources contribute significantly to the process.  I think "interdependence " is the higher value in promoting competent citizens.  

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María Dolores Díaz Noguera's curator insight, March 18, 2014 8:35 AM

Critical Thinking: Educating Competent Citizens

Susan Walker-Meere's curator insight, November 9, 2014 12:49 PM

I would add: Trans-disciplinary thinking; systems thinking for sustainability. Most people can not see the forest through the trees so miss the larger connections of the impacts that action, goods & services have on both environmental systems and human systems. 

Willem Kuypers's curator insight, November 16, 2014 3:48 PM

La pensée critique, une competence clé du 21ème siècle avec tant d'information qui nous arrive. 

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5 Reasons You Should Be Teaching Digital Citizenship

5 Reasons You Should Be Teaching Digital Citizenship | Montessori Education | Scoop.it
5 Reasons You Should Be Teaching Digital Citizenship

 

 

Students buzzed about the latest uproar on Instagram. Anonymous sources had posted a “questionable”–and NSFW–list for multiple public schools in our city on Instagram, leading to distraught girls, viral Twitter reactions, and an investigation [http://insiderlouisville.com/news/2014/01/16/jcps-officials-investigating-posting-inappropriate-photos-students-instagram/ ].

This type of cyberbullying and reckless use of digital communication is rampant among teens, but this recent episode was only unusually due to its elevated publicity.


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Alphablocks - 26 Strategies to Improve your Learning (Visual)

Alphablocks - 26 Strategies to Improve your Learning (Visual) | Montessori Education | Scoop.it

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Beth Dichter's curator insight, January 1, 2014 4:52 PM

How about starting a New Year by sharing learning strategies? Here is an infographic that provides 26 learning strategies. Consider sharing one a day for the next 26 days, or print out a copy and share it with your students. A few of the ideas included are:

* Connect the Dots

* Hypothesize, Test, Adjust

* Listen More

* Question Assumptions

Didactic Strategies 's curator insight, October 22, 2015 9:45 AM

Visual learning 

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Making Predictions Makes You Learn Better

Making Predictions Makes You Learn Better | Montessori Education | Scoop.it

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Beth Dichter's curator insight, December 25, 2013 12:58 PM

Another great post by Annie Murphy Paul that provides information on why we should have students make predictions to help them become more involved in the learning process. The image above has some key points but more information is available in the post.

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Why is My Teen So Forgetful?

Why is My Teen So Forgetful? | Montessori Education | Scoop.it
David Wilcox, of Musings on the Middle Years of Education, and I have worked together to create an infographic about the teen brain. It is based on a blog post he wrote over a year ago (Click here ...

Via Beth Dichter
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deni tafe library's curator insight, December 4, 2013 4:57 PM

Some relevance for teeenage students

Audrey's curator insight, December 5, 2013 3:24 PM

Thanks for this Beth.  I will add this to my tutorials for students.  It is very helpful, Audrey.  Also have a look at www.hotmoodle.com.

David Baker's curator insight, December 8, 2013 1:01 AM

I plan to share this at the School Accountability meeting I am chairing next week.  We have a standing agenda item - the middle school student.  This is a great resource and in a great format to start conversations at school and home.