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What’s Going on Inside the Brain Of A Curious Child?

What’s Going on Inside the Brain Of A Curious Child? | Montessori Education | Scoop.it
New research suggests that curiosity triggers chemical changes in the brain that help students better understand and retain information.

Via Beth Dichter
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Aurore A.N Beaini's comment, October 28, 2014 10:26 AM
http://blogs.kqed.org/mindshift/2013/04/how-to-stimulate-curiosity/
Aurore A.N Beaini's comment, October 28, 2014 10:28 AM
I think your post is very interesting for children anyway, it's also useful for mothers
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5 Practical Learning Tips Based On How People Do--And Don't--Learn

5 Practical Learning Tips Based On How People Do--And Don't--Learn | Montessori Education | Scoop.it

"There has been a large body of work in neuroscience, psychology, and related fields offering more and more insight into how we learn.

Below are five of the top tips from Barbara Oakley, Professor of Engineering at Oakland University, who has faced her own learning challenges (failing middle and high school math and science classes), and has made a study of the latest research on learning. She is also offering a free online course, Learning How to Learn, which starts August 1 on the Coursera platform with co-instructor, Prof. Terrence Sejnowski, a computational neuroscientist at UC San Diego and the Salk Institute."


Via Beth Dichter
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Beth Dichter's curator insight, July 30, 2014 6:02 AM

Are you interested in learning how to learn? This post provides 5 tips that may help you.

1. Get enough sleep to de-toxify your brain

2. Outwit procrastination with the Pomodoro technique

3. Use spaced repetition to remember key facts

4. Use recall rather than re-reading to see whether you’ve learned the content

5. Vary learning/studying environment

Each of these is explained in more detail in the post.

As teachers we are also learners, and it is never too late to become better at learning. Sharing these five tips with our students may help them become better learners. And if this is a topic of interest to you, consider checking out the Coursera course Learning How to Learn that will begin on August 1st.

James J. Goldsmith's curator insight, July 30, 2014 11:27 AM

Five practical and sometimes infrequently used ideas to enhance learning.

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Why is My Teen So Forgetful?

Why is My Teen So Forgetful? | Montessori Education | Scoop.it
David Wilcox, of Musings on the Middle Years of Education, and I have worked together to create an infographic about the teen brain. It is based on a blog post he wrote over a year ago (Click here ...

Via Beth Dichter
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deni tafe library's curator insight, December 4, 2013 4:57 PM

Some relevance for teeenage students

Audrey's curator insight, December 5, 2013 3:24 PM

Thanks for this Beth.  I will add this to my tutorials for students.  It is very helpful, Audrey.  Also have a look at www.hotmoodle.com.

David Baker's curator insight, December 8, 2013 1:01 AM

I plan to share this at the School Accountability meeting I am chairing next week.  We have a standing agenda item - the middle school student.  This is a great resource and in a great format to start conversations at school and home.

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Scientists Say Child's Play Helps Build A Better Brain

Scientists Say Child's Play Helps Build A Better Brain | Montessori Education | Scoop.it

"When it comes to brain development, time in the classroom may be less important than time on the playground.

'The experience of play changes the connections of the neurons at the front end of your brain,' says , a researcher at the University of Lethbridge in Alberta, Canada. 'And without play experience, those neurons aren't changed,' he says."


Via Beth Dichter
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Beth Dichter's curator insight, August 9, 2014 8:01 PM

Allowing young students free play time is important since it helps set up the prefrontal cortex (where executive functioning is located) to set up neuron pathways that help students to solve problems, make plans and regulate emotions. However, more and more schools are taking time away from recess, to focus on Common Core subjects.

It is critical that this is free play. The post states "No coaches, no umpires, no rule books."

Does your school have a policy about recess? Are students allowed to choose what to do, or are they given choices? This post shares insights that you may want to share with your PTO as well as others whom work in your school.

Nancy Jones's curator insight, August 10, 2014 11:08 AM

Not just young kids, all kids! Studies indicate that the prefrontal cortex isn't fully developed until mid -20's for some. Really confirms the adage, "All work and no play makes Jack a dull boy."

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How the Brain Learns—A Super Simple Explanation

How the Brain Learns—A Super Simple Explanation | Montessori Education | Scoop.it
eLearning professionals should learn more about the biological basis of learning. Check out this simple explanation.

Via Beth Dichter
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Chris Carter's curator insight, June 24, 2014 7:35 PM

This is your brain ... this is your brain when it learns.

Betty Skeet's curator insight, September 1, 2014 6:54 AM

We need to know more about how the brain works in the learning process so that eLearning can be more effective.

Shawn Wright's curator insight, September 6, 2014 9:14 PM

Cool