teaching and tech...
Follow
Find tag "Teaching and Learning Feedback"
645 views | +4 today
Your new post is loading...
Your new post is loading...
Rescooped by The Rice Process from 21st Century Teaching and Technology Resources
Scoop.it!

The Secret of Self-Regulated Learning | Faculty Focus

The Secret of Self-Regulated Learning | Faculty Focus | teaching and technology | Scoop.it
Self-regulated learning is like your own little secret. It stirs from within you, and is the voice in your head that asks you questions about your learning.

More formally, self-regulated learning is the conscious planning, monitoring, evaluation, and ultimately control of one’s learning in order to maximize it. It’s an ordered process that experts and seasoned learners like us practice automatically. It means being mindful, intentional, reflective, introspective, self-aware, self-controlled, and self-disciplined about learning, and it leads to becoming self-directed.

Via Rob Hatfield, M.Ed.
more...
Rob Hatfield, M.Ed.'s curator insight, June 16, 6:26 PM

This teaching approach can be included within both inquiry and problem-based learning strategies which can be blended in your 21 st century teaching and learning environments.

Suvi Salo's curator insight, June 17, 8:25 AM

Artikkelissa on viittaus tutkimukseen Ruohoniemi & Lindblom-Ylänne, 2009.

RuohoniemiRuohoniemi & Lindblom-Ylänne, 2009Ruohoniemi & Lindblom-Ylänne, 2009(Ruohoniemi & Lindblom-Ylänne, 2009).(Ruohoniemi & Lindblom-Ylänne, 2009).(Ruohoniemi & Lindblom-Ylänne, 2009).(Ruohoniemi & Lindblom-Ylänne, 2009).
Rescooped by The Rice Process from 21st Century Teaching and Technology Resources
Scoop.it!

Letter Grades Deserve an 'F' | The Atlantic

Letter Grades Deserve an 'F'  | The Atlantic | teaching and technology | Scoop.it
The adoption of the Common Core could usher in a new era of standards-based grading.

 

Worse, points-based grading undermines learning and creativity,rewards cheating, damages students' peer relationships and trust in their teachers, encourages students to avoid challenging work, and teaches students to value grades over knowledge.

 


Via Rob Hatfield, M.Ed.
more...
Rob Hatfield, M.Ed.'s curator insight, March 17, 8:41 PM

"Standards-based grading establishes one high standard—mastery—for all students. Students who move often, such as kids in poverty, the military, or the foster care system, benefit the most from a standards-based system of evaluation because it would quickly and clearly communicate their competence in a given subject based on a common set of standards."

 

Hopefully, Standards- based assessment and competency-based learning will move educational assessment into the 21st century teaching and learning environments.

David Snow's curator insight, March 18, 2:57 AM

There is a lot to think about here. An interesting and thought-provoking article, which should lead to a change in assessment practice.

Jim Goldsmith's curator insight, March 18, 11:15 AM

From the article:  "Teachers are trapped in a Catch-22. We are asked to assess our students precisely (many grading programs track scores to the hundredths place) and with the appearance of objectivity while using an inherently subjective process. Teachers are then asked to present their calculations on official documents and defend those numbers at parent-teacher conferences as if they are objective measures of student learning. For all the effort, time, and best intentions teachers invest in those reams of grade reports, we are lying to ourselves and to our students’ parents, cheating our students out of clear and accurate feedback on their academic process, and contributing to the greater illusion that grades are an accurate reflection of skill mastery."  Explores an important issue with well-written, thoughtful prose.

Rescooped by The Rice Process from teaching and technology
Scoop.it!

10 Ways Teacher Planning Should Adjust To The Google Generation | TeachThought

10 Ways Teacher Planning Should Adjust To The Google Generation | TeachThought | teaching and technology | Scoop.it
10 Ways Teacher Planning Should Adjust To The Google Generation

 

For the Google Generation, information isn’t scarce, and knowing has the illusion of only being a search away.

 

I’ve written before about how Google impacts the way students think. This post is less about students, and more about how planning resources like standards and curriculum maps might respond accordingly.

 

Curriculum maps are helpful little documents that standardize learning. That is, they clarify the content to be learned, and offer a shared pathway and schedule to deliver that content to students. Curriculum maps function as a kind of overview of learning content, and can also provide a common ground for the reform of planned learning activities based on assessment data (O’Malley, 1982).


Via Rob Hatfield, M.Ed., The Rice Process
more...
Rob Hatfield, M.Ed.'s curator insight, February 21, 8:44 PM

I do wish in Google Education, that Google would bring back the Google Wonder Wheel and Time line.  This was very useful in teaching with English Language Learners.

Kirsten Macaulay's curator insight, February 21, 11:43 PM

10 Ways Teacher Planning Should Adjust To The Google Generation & The Age Of Information

1. Make the work Google-proof

2. Force them to grapple with big questions without answers

3. Actually make social networks and media channels part of curriculum

4. Focus on learning strategies 

5. Create curriculum and lessons that absorb data seamlessly

6. Anticipate student needs

7. Focus less on “understanding”

8. Use spiraling by design

9. Discourage use of traditional units

10. Illuminate the nuance of the world

and bonus!

11. Promote discovery and curiosity and self-direction over coverage and compliance

 

The Age of Information is characterized by discovery, curiosity, whimsy, and connectivity–all which necessitate self-monitoring and self-direction.

Christy P.Novack's curator insight, February 23, 11:36 AM

A nicely written article with strong points on what is beneficial for students. However, the reality of implementing some of the tips is beyond just the teacher in the classroom and exposes other challenges. #edtech #instructionaldesign

Rescooped by The Rice Process from 21st Century Teaching and Learning
Scoop.it!

5 Assessment Strategies Every Teacher Should Know

5 Assessment Strategies Every Teacher Should Know | teaching and technology | Scoop.it
5 Assessment Strategies Every Teacher Should Know

 

Most teachers and current textbooks offer varied approaches to the material to be learned so the teaching can be brain-compatible with the varied student learning styles. It is only logical that respect for these individual learning styles be incorporated into assessment forms.


Via Rob Hatfield, M.Ed.
more...
Rob Hatfield, M.Ed.'s curator insight, February 11, 6:48 PM

These teaching and learning assessment strategies can be adapted to fit within your learning environment.

Juan Legarda's curator insight, February 12, 6:22 PM

Learning Styles and Assessment:

Kirsten Macaulay's curator insight, February 13, 5:28 AM

Option 1: Open-Book & Take-Home Tests

 

Option 2: Student-Made Tests

 

How My Students Create And Study For Their Own Exams

This is the process I use for student-created math final exams in my classroom. Your process may differ depending on grade level, content area, or other local concerns.

I give the structure for the tests students are required to create such as, “Include 15 calculations and 5 word problems with 2 from each of the 10 subsections of the chapter”I make a copy of each test and change the numbers, but not the structure of the equations. They knew I would do this and that the numbers will be different than the ones they usedStudents are assigned homework to make practice tests on their own, using the template of the test they created and changing the numbers themselvesIn class, for further review, students exchange their practice tests with partners for study and to the confirm accuracy of their answers (as I don’t have an answer key to all of their self-created tests)

Option 3: The Complexity & Diversity Of Project-Based Learning

Option 4: Written Response–Or Rather, The Pre-Writing

Option 5: Ask A Question


Great article.

Rescooped by The Rice Process from 21st Century Teaching and Learning
Scoop.it!

Assessment vs. Accountability

Assessment vs. Accountability | teaching and technology | Scoop.it

We need to begin to articulate our vision and our plan to put balance on the board.  At the very least, we need to have profound insight into what needs to be done locally and coalesce our communities around an educational agenda...one with standards and accountability and more and with children at its core. We believe we will be heard and, then, we must be ready. At least we hope that is what happens.


Via Rob Hatfield, M.Ed.
more...
Rob Hatfield, M.Ed.'s curator insight, December 15, 2013 7:04 PM

This is an interesting article of double standards in education and the lack of "common sense" when it comes to assessment vs. accountability.

Rescooped by The Rice Process from 21st Century Teaching and Learning
Scoop.it!

Six Questions That Will Bring Your Teaching Philosophy into Focus | Faculty Focus

Six Questions That Will Bring Your Teaching Philosophy into Focus | Faculty Focus | teaching and technology | Scoop.it
Earlier this year, a couple of contributions to The Teaching Professor (Haave 2014) and Faculty Focus (Weimer 2014) discussed the place of learning philosophies in our teaching. The online comments to Weimer’s blog post (2014) made me think more about how we as instructors need to be careful to bridge instructivist and constructivist teaching approaches for students not yet familiar with taking responsibility for their own learning (Venkatesh et al 2013).

Via Rob Hatfield, M.Ed.
more...
Rob Hatfield, M.Ed.'s curator insight, June 2, 6:20 PM

This is an excellent resource article that provides key questions which can bring focus within your teaching and learning environment and your professional development.

steve smith's curator insight, June 5, 12:10 AM

Do you ever stop to think about what and why you are doing things ? we ask our students to do this but do we as teachers ??

Rescooped by The Rice Process from 21st Century Teaching and Learning
Scoop.it!

The Key Differences Between Summative And Formative Assessments | Edudemic

The Key Differences Between Summative And Formative Assessments | Edudemic | teaching and technology | Scoop.it

Assessments are a part of every classroom, regardless of subject matter or grade level. Theycome in all shapes and sizes, and they can be used for a number of reasons.

 

Sometimes, the differences between the types of assessments can be subtle. Many teachers will find that some subjects lend themselves really well to certain types of question formats (like multiple choice vs. short answer vs. essay), but the style of question shouldn’t be confused with the type of assessment.

 

While there are many more, summative and formative assessments are probably two of the most widely used in education today. The handy infographic below takes a look at the main concepts of each type of assessment along with examples of each. 


Via Rob Hatfield, M.Ed.
more...
Rob Hatfield, M.Ed.'s curator insight, February 22, 8:30 PM

This is a good infographic on summative and formative assessments for your teaching and learning environments.

Rescooped by The Rice Process from 21st Century Teaching and Technology Resources
Scoop.it!

10 Ways Teacher Planning Should Adjust To The Google Generation | TeachThought

10 Ways Teacher Planning Should Adjust To The Google Generation | TeachThought | teaching and technology | Scoop.it
10 Ways Teacher Planning Should Adjust To The Google Generation

 

For the Google Generation, information isn’t scarce, and knowing has the illusion of only being a search away.

 

I’ve written before about how Google impacts the way students think. This post is less about students, and more about how planning resources like standards and curriculum maps might respond accordingly.

 

Curriculum maps are helpful little documents that standardize learning. That is, they clarify the content to be learned, and offer a shared pathway and schedule to deliver that content to students. Curriculum maps function as a kind of overview of learning content, and can also provide a common ground for the reform of planned learning activities based on assessment data (O’Malley, 1982).


Via Rob Hatfield, M.Ed.
more...
Rob Hatfield, M.Ed.'s curator insight, February 21, 8:44 PM

I do wish in Google Education, that Google would bring back the Google Wonder Wheel and Time line.  This was very useful in teaching with English Language Learners.

Kirsten Macaulay's curator insight, February 21, 11:43 PM

10 Ways Teacher Planning Should Adjust To The Google Generation & The Age Of Information

1. Make the work Google-proof

2. Force them to grapple with big questions without answers

3. Actually make social networks and media channels part of curriculum

4. Focus on learning strategies 

5. Create curriculum and lessons that absorb data seamlessly

6. Anticipate student needs

7. Focus less on “understanding”

8. Use spiraling by design

9. Discourage use of traditional units

10. Illuminate the nuance of the world

and bonus!

11. Promote discovery and curiosity and self-direction over coverage and compliance

 

The Age of Information is characterized by discovery, curiosity, whimsy, and connectivity–all which necessitate self-monitoring and self-direction.

Christy P.Novack's curator insight, February 23, 11:36 AM

A nicely written article with strong points on what is beneficial for students. However, the reality of implementing some of the tips is beyond just the teacher in the classroom and exposes other challenges. #edtech #instructionaldesign

Rescooped by The Rice Process from 21st Century Teaching and Learning
Scoop.it!

Interactive Rubrics as Assessment for Learning

Interactive Rubrics as Assessment for Learning | teaching and technology | Scoop.it

Moving Forward

Below are a few ways that I can imagine any teacher, regardless of grade level or content area, using interactive rubrics.


Via Rob Hatfield, M.Ed.
more...
Rob Hatfield, M.Ed.'s curator insight, December 18, 2013 6:36 PM

"The whole thing sounds so ridiculously simple -- give students easy access to a resource that will help with a challenging skill. Not so groundbreaking, right? But sometimes it's the little things that can make a big difference with our students, and I hope this is one of those times."

 

What is more significant about the interactive rubrics is not will the assessment give the teacher feedback required for teaching and learning adjustment but would allow deeper learning to occur.