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The Question Game: A Playful Way To Teach Critical Thinking

The Question Game: A Playful Way To Teach Critical Thinking | Montessori Education | Scoop.it

"Big idea: Teaching kids to ask smart questions on their own

A four-year-old asks on average about 400 questions per day, and an adult hardly asks any. Our school system is structured around rewards for regurgitating the right answer, and not asking smart questions – in fact, it discourages asking questions. With the result that as we grow older, we stop asking questions. Yet asking good questions is essential to find and develop solutions, and an important skill in innovation, strategy, and leadership. So why do we stop asking questions – and more importantly, why don’t we train each other, and our future leaders, to ask the right questions starting from early on?"

 

 

Learn more:

 

http://www.scoop.it/t/21st-century-learning-and-teaching?tag=Critical-Thinking

 


Via Beth Dichter, Dean J. Fusto, Suvi Salo, Juanita Jackson, Gust MEES
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niftyjock's curator insight, February 8, 2015 9:32 PM

dice student

Arizona State University, Claire McLaughlin's curator insight, February 9, 2015 11:11 AM

Anything that gives students a chance to ask their own questions is a good idea in my opinion.  When the questions invoke critical thinking, it's a double bonus!  Also, writing these questions on any pre-made box would work.  No need to be crafty with scissors and tape.

Simon Awuyo's curator insight, February 11, 2015 2:04 PM

The student teachers need these tips to help them cultivate skills of asking probing questions to become better teachers tomorrow.

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Practical critical thinking skills for the real world

Practical critical thinking skills for the real world | Montessori Education | Scoop.it
Teaching concepts in the classroom doesn't accomplish anything unless students understand how those ideas apply to the real world.

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Are You a Credible Technology Leader?

Are You a Credible Technology Leader? | Montessori Education | Scoop.it
We do not need our leaders to be our best users of technology, but they should know enough to safely use some of it and enthusiastically encourage and lead their teachers to use much of it.

 

Leadership, good leadership, transcends physical boundaries.  Technology cannot be dismissed from the leadership's responsibility to be in the know.  It is acceptable for the teachers to be more skilled than their leader in the use of technology with students. 

 

But it is not acceptable for the leader to stay removed from its use.  We need to learn beside our faculties and know and understanding the tools they are using. Room must be made for common understanding and improved use. 

 

Teachers, students and parents need to trust that those who make technology available and who advocate for its use know what they are talking about. The right mix of vision, knowledge, risk taking... and a dash of courage ...make schools dynamic learning environment for all of us.

 

The warning is against leaders giving the nod to their teachers without understanding the technology. 

 

===> It raises issues of trust, integrity and safety. <===

 


Via Gust MEES
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Critical Thinking Takes Courage

Critical Thinking Takes Courage | Montessori Education | Scoop.it
Critical thinking isn't an entirely natural process; it's one that requires courage.

 

Learn more:

 

http://www.scoop.it/t/21st-century-learning-and-teaching/?tag=Critical-Thinking

 


Via Suvi Salo, Mark E. Deschaine, PhD, Dean J. Fusto, Gust MEES
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Chris Carter's curator insight, June 24, 2014 7:33 PM

Yes, and YES!!! Critical thinking really takes risk, because someone is likely to disagree with you. How much better it is, however, to have a well thought opinion and stand alone, than to be a lemming. 

Lisa McCarthy's curator insight, June 25, 2014 8:21 AM

A really excellent article on something that can be hard to define and practice, and yet is such an essential skill for life.   I really like the distinction Terry Heick makes between thought and knowledge and the interplay between them.

Javier Antonio Bellina's curator insight, June 25, 2014 11:38 AM

El pensamiento crítico requiere coraje, actitud y valor que no se fomenta en los sistemas educativos en general debido a los riesgos que conlleva.

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How to make critical thinking exercises fun

How to make critical thinking exercises fun | Montessori Education | Scoop.it
One of the greatest aspects of teaching students critical thinking skills is that, especially when compared to traditional classroom activities, critical thinking exercises can be a lot of fun.

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