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Rescooped by A/Prof Jon Willis from The 21st Century
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What I Learned By Flipping The MOOC

What I Learned By Flipping The MOOC | Teaching and Learning software and topics | Scoop.it
VideoTwo of the hot topics in education in the last few years have been Massive Open Online Courses (MOOCs) and the flipped classroom. I’ve been experimenting with both of them. What I’ve learned (besides being able to use the word “pedagogy” in a sentence) is 1) assigning students lectures as homework doesn’t guarantee [...]

Via Dr. Susan Bainbridge
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Rescooped by A/Prof Jon Willis from Learning with MOOCs
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How two-thirds of my students never showed up, but half of them passed

How two-thirds of my students never showed up, but half of them passed | Teaching and Learning software and topics | Scoop.it

"...It’s also a factor that, as recently noted in the New York Times, signing up for a MOOC “takes less time than signing up for an iTunes account,” and that it then takes even less time simply to disappear from a crowd of 55,000..."


Via SusanBat
A/Prof Jon Willis's insight:

Having just failed my third MOOC by  not showing up, I'm interested in how my experience reflects that of other parts of "the denominator". It does seem like teaching MOOCS is even more dispiriting than teaching face-to-face classes where three quarters of the students never show up in person after the first assignment is handed in. ON the one hand, its encouraging that my online support materials allow most of these students to pass without checking in on me in person; on the other hand a lot of the wisdom I have to offer as a teacher only appears live in class. 

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Rescooped by A/Prof Jon Willis from Learning with MOOCs
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MOOCs as Neocolonialism: Who Controls Knowledge?

MOOCs as Neocolonialism: Who Controls Knowledge? | Teaching and Learning software and topics | Scoop.it

Via Ana Cristina Pratas, SusanBat
A/Prof Jon Willis's insight:

"Neither knowledge nor pedagogy is neutral ... Those responsible for creating, designing, and delivering MOOC courses do not seek to impose their values or methodologies on others; influence happens organically and without conspiracies. A combination of powerful academic cultures, the location of the main creators and disseminators of MOOCs, and the orientation of most of those creating and teaching MOOCs ensures the domination of the largely English-speaking academic systems."

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Ana Cristina Pratas's curator insight, December 4, 2013 11:33 PM

"Massive open online courses, or MOOCs, are the latest effort to harness information technology for higher education. While they are still in a nascent stage of development, many in academe are enthusiastic about their potential to be an inexpensive way of delivering an education to vast audiences.

 

 

 

Yet one aspect of the MOOC movement has not been fully analyzed: who controls the knowledge. MOOCs are largely an American-led effort, and the majority of the courses available so far come from universities in the United States or other Western countries. Universities and educators in less-developed regions of the world are climbing onto the MOOC bandwagon, but it is likely that they will be using the technology, pedagogical ideas, and probably significant parts of the content developed elsewhere. In this way, the online courses threaten to exacerbate the worldwide influence of Western academe, bolstering its higher-education hegemony."

Rescooped by A/Prof Jon Willis from Learning with MOOCs
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Infographic: Why Aren't Students Completing MOOCs?

Infographic: Why Aren't Students Completing MOOCs? | Teaching and Learning software and topics | Scoop.it

MOOCs (free online courses that are open to anyone) are more popular than Justin Bieber right now, but why aren't students finishing the courses they signed up for?


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Elaine Watkins's curator insight, October 24, 2013 10:29 PM

I was one of the 36% of students who completed the Equine Nutrition course. I can tell you why I was able to... It was because there was excellent support from the lecturers, easy to access video lectures, no hard deadlines until the end of the course, meaning there was much more flexibility for people, like me, who work full time and can't always complete quizzes by 6pm each Monday for example. I could do it in my own time, as long as I stayed within the course duration and I found that some weeks I had much more time and could complete 2 weeks worth of readings & quizzes. 

In contrast, I just attempted to complete an Animal Behaviour course, but unfortunately due to hard deadlines each Monday, I was unable to complete quizzes on time and therefore could not achieve the marks necessary to pass, so I gave up halfway through. I have still completed readings and watched lectures, but with no result as the quizzes did not count after the weekly hard deadlines. Obviously many people had the same issue as me, because out of 24950, only

1428 people completed the course.

I believe course designers need to revisit their courses and ensure they are flexible enough for full time workers to do in their own time. 

Christine Aizpurua's curator insight, October 31, 2013 11:57 AM

Me ! 

Patricia Christian's curator insight, February 8, 2014 5:45 AM

An integral part of any online learning environment is the social synergy created via communication and discussion.  This is where deep reflection and learning take place.  Are students not feeling connected.  Are they collaborating and creating something new with the knowledge they have gained and sharing it with others?  Learning must me meaningful and applicable.