Teaching and Learning
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Myths and Shibboleths

Myths and Shibboleths | Teaching and Learning | Scoop.it
What doesn’t work and why? The preliminary article to this, What Works and Why? can be found at Optimus Education Do we know enough as teachers about what works and why? Dr Howard-Jones thinks not. His 2014 research, reported here, criticises “ineffective” teaching practices “sold to teachers as based on neuroscience [which have] no educational value and are often associated with poor practice in the classroom.” Similarly in his 2015 article for the American Educator, Tom Bennett decries the “cacophony of the fashionable, the novel, the exciting ” that has dominated educational thinking, perhaps explained by research reported here, which finds that there is something uniquely convincing about neuroscience in the context of explaining the mind. Terry Burnham warns here about ideas that build up ‘meme-mentum.’ The 2015 OECD Education Policy Outlook found that only 10% of international education policy initiatives were evaluated. As Andreas Schleicher says, “If we want to improve educational outcomes we need to have a much more systematic and evidence-based approach.” But, as Carl Hendrick points out here, because the model of teacher effectiveness in Britain has been ‘outside in’ rather than ‘inside out,’ teachers are “passive participants,” in comparison to the findings of the 2012 Grattan Report Catching Up: Learning from the best school systems in East Asia that teachers were “partners” in a “strong culture of teaching education, research, collaboration, mentoring, feedback and sustained professional development.” Myth 1: We can see learning Learning is neither a visible nor a ‘snap shot’ process. ‘Progress-checking’ by any other method than on-going assessment therefore has the following pitfalls: * Students may pretend that they have learned information * Students may think that they have learned information and be wrong * Students may have learned information incorrectly * Students may have learned information but then forget it * Students may have learned information but be unable to transfer it to unfamiliar contexts Robert Coe argues here that we have focused on easily observable “outcomes that we mistake for learning rather than ... real learning.” Graham Nuthall found in The Hidden Lives of Learners for example that, “ students can be busiest and most involved in material they already know.” James Theo outlines the dangers of poor proxies for learning here. As Alex Quigley points out here, it can also be tempting to mistake correlation for causation: “This is of course of crucial importance in schools. We are constantly being sold silver bullets whose evidence is based on loose correlation (or worse) and nothing like causation.” Strategies to accurately assess learning David Didau has written extensively on the fact that learning is invisible . Myth 2: Learning is intuitive The DFE’s espousal of learning styles in Pedagogy into Practice: Learning Styles was not based on rigorous research: “From the moment we are born we make sense of the world through our five senses. However, neuro-linguistic programming (NLP) practitioners argue that those five senses may not contribute equally to that perception and that individuals may have a sensory preference for receiving and making sense of new information and ideas. They have identified three types of learner.” Research into urban legends in education by Kirschner and Merrienboer here identifies the following problems with learning styles: * Many people do not fit one particular style * “The relationship between what people say about how they learn and how they actually learn is weak.” * At least 71 learning styles have been identified. * Research by Clark found that “learner preference was typically uncorrelated or negatively correlated to learning and learning outcomes. That is, learners who reported preferring a particular instructional technique typically did not derive any instructional benefit from experiencing it.” Similarly, Kirschner, Sweller and Clark found here that learners’ preferences can be unhelpful: “Less able learners who choose less guided approaches tend to like the experience even though they learn less from it.” In comparison, task-specific learning strategies embedded in instructional presentations “require explicit, attention-driven effort on the part of the learners and so tend not to be liked, even though they are helpful to learning.” Conversely, “Higher aptitude students who chose highly structured approaches tended to like them but achieve at a lower level...[because they] have acquired implicit, task-specific learning strategies that are more effective for them than those embedded in the structured versions of the course...[but] believe that they will achieve the required learning with a minimum of effort.” Daniel Willingham on Why Learning Styles Don’t Exist David Didau explodes Right Brain/ Left Brain Bollocks Myth 3: Learning must be collaborative As Tom Bennett points out in Group Work for the Good, the emphasis on group work owes much to Vygotsky, who argued that: “what a child can do today in cooperation, tomorrow he will be able to do on his own.” Group work can be effective – particularly where a dialectic process deepens students’ understanding - but it has pitfalls: * It may not be as effective or efficient as individual work in ensuring all students think hard about the learning * Student-to-student interaction may be lower level than teacher-involved interaction * It may focus on proxies for learning such as engagement or student interaction * It may make assessment of individual learning more difficult * It may prevent conditions of desirable difficulty Interestingly, Nuthall found in The Hidden Lives of Learners that much of what students learn from each other is actually wrong. David Didau on Should Group Work be Imposed? Myth 4: Growth mindset alone is the answer It’s a bit more complicated than that. Astbury and Plomin point out in G is for Genes that, “for genetic as well as environmental reasons, it will be harder for some people to develop a growth mindset than others.” Carl Hendrick warns here against reductionist ‘pop psychology’ in “ promising areas” like Growth Mindset, which fails to take into account students’ multidimensional self-concept and underestimates the impact of achievement on self-perception, which Muijs and Reynolds found here to be “ stronger than the effect of self-concept on achievement.” Similarly, David Didau warns here that “growth mindset has been so universally heralded as a ‘good thing’ that it’s in danger of becoming one of those memes we think with rather than about.” Nick Rose points out here that school interventions designed to improve students’ metacognition and ‘character’ can be problematic. A 2015 review on, The potential for school-based interventions that target executive function to improve academic achievement suggested that: “There is surprisingly little rigorous empirical research that explores the nature of the association between executive function and achievement and almost no research that critically examines whether the association is causal. From the existing research it is not clear whether improving executive functioning skills among students would cause their achievement to rise as a result.” The review found that none of the skills-based approaches that it investigated appeared to directly improve student outcomes. Scott Alexander critiques growth mindset here Nick Rose Growth Mindset: It’s not magic How to use Growth Mindset effectively: Growth Mindset – so What’s Next? by Alex Quigley. Myth 5: research alone is the answer Again, it’s more complicated than that. Tom Bennett argues here that: “Teachers need to interact with what the best evidence is saying and translate it through the lens of their experience... Teaching is not, and can never be a research-based, or research-led profession. Research can’t tell us what the right questions to ask are, nor can it authoritatively speak for all circumstances and contexts... [but] it can assist bringing together the shared wisdom of the teaching community... Teaching can — and needs to be —research informed, possibly research augmented. The craft, the art of it, is at the heart of it. Working out what works also means working out what we mean by ‘works’, and where science, heart and wisdom overlap and where they don’t.” Daniel Willingham suggests here that the main reason for a cognitive dissonance between teachers’ belief in the validity of research and the techniques they use in the classroom, is fear of losing autonomy. However, Carl Hendrick here cites Stenhouse’s argument that research in which teachers are involved is in fact “the route to teacher emancipation.” Alex Quigley warns against an uncritical ‘the research says’ approach here . What next and where? 8 ideas As Andy Tharby points out here, “What is most critical... is that we question, test and evaluate our assumptions and intuitions, whatever our position in the educational system – from trainee teacher to Secretary of State. Unless the evidence is incontrovertible (and it almost never is) always avoid the simplistic answer, however seductive it sounds.” 1. In Four Ways to Use Evidence in Education, Harry Fletcher Wood suggests: * Looking for evidence of our impact * Asking for evidence * Improving our teaching using research * Developing Research Lead roles in schools 2. Check out Education Data Lab, which brings together a team of academics, researchers and statisticians to produce independent research that can be used by schools to improve practice. 3. Check out the Education Endowment Fund’s brokerage service, which links research with classroom practice. 4. Geoff Petty suggests how to use evidence to improve teaching here 5. Highbury Grove School’s vision for the research-engaged school 6. Check out ResearchED 7. Keep up to date with research through twitter. The following blogs are great places to start: * Chronotope * Evidence into Practice * The Learning Spy * Hunting English * Improving Teaching 8. Check out schools developing research-informed practice * Michaela School, London Pragmatic Education * Durrington High School, Worthing Class Teaching * Belmont Community School, Durham Belmont Teach * Meols Cop High School, Southport Meols Cop High School Learning and Teaching Blog
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Spaces for Learning

Spaces for Learning | Teaching and Learning | Scoop.it
Learning is impacted by many forces such as the learner’s disposition to the process, the quality of their teacher’s pedagogy, their emotional state and nature of the curriculum. Amongst this long list of factors is naturally the environment in which that learning occurs and the relationship between the environment and the learner. Our understanding of this relationship has grown and fortunately today’s educators are more willing to experiment with the way spaces are organised to promote learning. The new buzzword to describe learning spaces is ‘flexible’, but what does this mean and how might we ensure that our attractive new spaces do more than look pretty. Historic Classroom - courtesy of William Creswell - Flickr You do not have to go far back in time to find images of classrooms that fit the look and feel experienced by the first students to experience formalised school education. Sadly you most likely can find classrooms that fit this image in your local school, today. A blackboard or Interactive Whiteboard at the front of the room, a teachers desk beside it, rows of neatly aligned desks and walls conspicuously devoid of colour or covered in carefully selected pieces of student work with a motivational poster going yellow in one corner. Ken Robinson has entertained many audiences with stories of this sort of classroom, stories that are entertaining to so many because they fit perfectly with their experience of school. But not all classrooms are like this, some present learners with a mix of spaces suitable to a variety of learning modes or meet these varying needs through the use of spaces that are readily adapted throughout the day. Flexible learning spaces that may be tailored to the needs of the learners are said to be the future of learning. The classroom of the future as seen in the emerging spaces of today’s flexible classrooms will be bright airy spaces, full of colour and comfortable furnishings that can be arranged in many ways to create spaces of varying shapes and sizes. The classroom is becoming increasingly homely with spaces to lounge, spaces to sit formally at desks, spaces for collaboration and spaces for quiet reflection. Like so many ideas these flexible spaces first appeared in the offices of the young and hip start up companies of Silicon Valley. Google in addition to leading the world into the era of ‘search’ and all things online also led the way with the adoption of workspaces that smashed the stereotype cubicle spaces of their old economy competitors. Google took the colours of its well-known logo, combined them with playful design sensibilities and open spaces that were readily adapted to differing needs and gave the world a new design aesthetic. New trends in office design are envied by schools - Skype, Google and KBS+ Since then there has been a good deal of experimentation with learning spaces and we are beginning to understand how to best utilise this new way of thinking. One of the first significant moves forward was the emergence of a metalanguage for the types of spaces we are likely to have. The origins of this language are a little murky but a good starting point is probably the work of architects Prakash Nair, Randall Fielding and Dr. Jeffrey Lackney of Design Share. Their work embodies so much of what has been adopted in a modern design language for schools and introduced three key spaces. Using metaphors from ancient civilisations spaces are seen as Campfires, Watering Holes or Cave Spaces; each serving a different purpose but acting together to meet the needs of a group of learners throughout a day. Campfires are spaces that allow communication on a large scale and fit the model of the lecture into a friendlier space that encourages more back and forth interaction. The Campfire space is best supported by spaces for collaboration on a smaller scale with nearby breakout spaces or flexibility in furnishings that offer this function. Watering Holes are spaces for small group collaboration and should include spaces that facilitate spontaneous interactions and socialisation. By nature they are likely to be loud but can be adapted to the specific needs of the group. Cave Spaces are for individuals and pairs who need access to a quiet space for reflection and meditative thinking. These spaces offer a foundation along with ideas such as tiered seating and task specific areas (wet areas, lab spaces, performance spaces) but with an agenda to allow spaces to be adapted and remixed to suit the needs of the learner schools should create spaces to suit their specific needs. Hellerup School in Denmark seen by many as the poster child for new learning spaces Beyond the physical nature of the spaces there are important considerations for how they are to be used. A quick search online will reveal countless images of attractive educational spaces but such images present a potential risk to school planners. The design of any learning space must be guided by sound principles of learning and the spaces need to be matched to the pedagogy of those who will use them. The most amazing space will fail to enhance learning if it does not suit the needs of its users. There is a danger in hoping that new learning spaces will transform tired pedagogy; a belief that is not reflected by experience. In Sydney, Northern Beaches Christian School has had great success with its use of flexible learning spaces and has adopted the language of Nair, Fielding and Lackeny. Visitors to the school are told how these spaces evolved overtime to suit shifts in the ways their teachers taught and learners learned. The pedagogy of the school evolved overtime and this shift demanded new spaces to suit. A large financial investment without careful planning and preparation for how the new spaces will be embedded into the school’s learning platform is likely to result in spaces that are under utilised. Playful spaces that encourage students to engage with their environment in new ways With the adoption of new learning spaces come new opportunities for student learning. With choice should come an understanding of the choices that are made. Research has shown that the nature of the space can have an effect on the way we learn at a neurological level. Spaces full of noise and movement suit learning that is goal oriented in which the learner has a clear direction and understands how to get there. The brain responds to this environment in specific ways and the architecture of the brain in this environment is well suited to this mode of learning. This is why we are able to get certain tasks done effectively when listening to loud music but it also explains why this environment is not well suited to tasks requiring more open ended, reflective and creative thinking. In the loud environment the brains architecture is like a metaphorical mountain range with steep valleys according to Claxton and Lucas writing in ‘New Kinds of Smart’, sticking to the valleys allows us to traverse the pathways to completing a task quickly and with focus. At other times in a calm environment the brain is in what they call ‘Meadow Mode’ where a metaphor of a brain with flatter open spaces illustrates a more meditative style with open pathways for connecting ideas and big picture thinking. Understanding that the spaces we are learning in can affect the brains mode of operating is essential. What we want is for our students to have a range of spaces to choose from and the ability to explain why they are choosing one space over another. Spatial metacognition should become a skill for learners as they are empowered to select and even organise spaces to suit their learning. Whimsical Cave Spaces from Google Zurich offices Lastly the way that we organise our spaces is only part of the discussion of how the learning environment shapes the learning that occurs within it. How we decorate these spaces has a significant impact too. Traditionally learning spaces, particularly in Primary schools are adorned with lovingly completed works of the students interspersed with carefully selected motivational phrases or images. These displays say a lot about what schools value; that is finished and near perfect pieces of work. This model is being challenged and schools are finding success in using their wall spaces as a combination of planning and ideational space that shows works in progress alongside tips and strategies that can be applied to learning; ideas generated by the students as they reflect on their learning. The wall spaces become an extension of the student’s exercise books and digital devices onto which the students arrange ideas as they evolve to be shared and commented on. If a school values a Growth Mindset this use of displays spaces goes a long way to reinforcing the belief that learning is messy and requires hard work with mistakes and revisions on the way. A space to inspire young imaginations, this one in an Alabama Resort, not a school. Undoubtedly the new learning spaces bring a fresh level of excitement to schools and students quickly fall in love with the options and the playfulness they offer. The challenge for schools is to avoid the lure of shiny new toys and ensure that the adoption of flexible spaces is part of a bigger shift in thinking that includes effective pedagogies and supports for teachers who will be using the new spaces. by Nigel Coutts Essential Reading: Nair, P., & Fielding, R. (2005). The language of school design. [Minneapolis, Minn.]: DesignShare. Nair, P. (2014) Blueprint for Tomorrow: Redesigning Schools for Student-Centered Learning. Harvard Education Press The Third Teacher: 79 Ways You Can Use Design to Transform Teaching & Learning by OWP/P Architects, VS Furtniture, and Bruce Mau Design Lucas, B., & Claxton, G. (2010). New kinds of smart. Maidenhead, England: Open University Press.
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12 Ways to Make Money on the Side as a Teacher | Edudemic

12 Ways to Make Money on the Side as a Teacher | Edudemic | Teaching and Learning | Scoop.it
Unlike teachers in other leading education systems the world over, American teachers are underpaid for their education, expertise, energy, and time.
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Creating Your Book Using the Most Popular eBook Formats | Edudemic

Creating Your Book Using the Most Popular eBook Formats | Edudemic | Teaching and Learning | Scoop.it
Although many new authors assume their books will be digital or electronic in format, it’s worth considering whether a print product might suit your needs.
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How to Prevent Testing Burnout | Edudemic

How to Prevent Testing Burnout | Edudemic | Teaching and Learning | Scoop.it
How do we keep students engaged when everyone's suffering testing burnout? The solution may be easier than you think.
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The 10 Skills Modern Teachers Must Have | Edudemic

The 10 Skills Modern Teachers Must Have | Edudemic | Teaching and Learning | Scoop.it
Check out what skill we think makes a modern teacher, and let us know your thoughts on the matter in the comments below.
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Journalistic Ethics

Journalistic Ethics | Teaching and Learning | Scoop.it
This video lecture series on Journalistic Ethics by Jim Newton, editor-at-large of the Los Angeles Times, this course is an intensive examination of ethical and policy issues arising from interaction of media institutions (print, film,...
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Education of Children with Disabilities

Education of Children with Disabilities | Teaching and Learning | Scoop.it
This video Lecture series on Education of Children with Disabilities by Professor Gay Goodman of The University of Houston provides an overview of special education.
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Educational Psychology

Educational Psychology | Teaching and Learning | Scoop.it
This video Lecture series on Educational Psychology by Professor David Liberman of The University of Houston is an introduction to Educational psychology emphasizing human development and learning, motivation, instructional applications, individual...
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Problems of Normal Life

Problems of Normal Life | Teaching and Learning | Scoop.it
An video Lecture course on Problems of Normal Life by Professor Richard Kasschau in which he examines and explains about psychological issues and decisions and stressing characteristics of modern living and discusses coping strategies used to...
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Introduction to Cognitive Psychology

Introduction to Cognitive Psychology | Teaching and Learning | Scoop.it
This video lecture series on Introduction to Cognitive Psychology by Professor Richard A.
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Industrial Organizational Psychology

Industrial Organizational Psychology | Teaching and Learning | Scoop.it
This is a video lecture series on Industrial Organizational Psychology by Lynda Villanueva. Industrial Organizational Psychology is designed to provide an introduction to the field of Industrial Organizational psychology.
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Five Myths of Project- Based Learning Dissected and Debunked

Five Myths of Project- Based Learning Dissected and Debunked | Teaching and Learning | Scoop.it
Seven years ago I became a brand- new educator for the second time. Though I was in a comfortable position in a well- established school of good repute, I needed something more, though, at the time, I didn't know exactly what that was. Then, something came along at just the right moment. Our school corporation took a leap of faith by starting a Project- Based Learning program, a courageous move that has changed the educational landscape of our community and region. I leaped, along with a group of trailblazing ninth graders and a small handful of educators hungry for change. We went all- in with an educational model that many had written off as a fad. Along the way, I've had the most profound professional education I’ve ever had. I’ve become an immensely better instructor than I was in my previous ten years’ experience; I owe this to the special dynamic that PBL both requires and creates. I learned how to work with my incredible adult team and guide our awesome, curious and adventurous students through rich learning experiences. It hasn’t all been pretty. We made plenty of mistakes, some resulting in students deciding it was “not a good fit” and transferring. Some staff members found the rigors of project planning completely overwhelming to the point that they either left our school or left education altogether. In the end, though, the journey has left me a staunch advocate for PBL. There is no model of education that can be implemented well without the right personnel, and PBL is nothing if not demanding of competence, flexibility, open- mindedness, and tolerance of failures. But I stand, with a rapidly growing population of renegade educators, as cheerleaders for a method that works—as long as it’s done right. There are misconceptions about PBL. Some stem from those who have tried to implement it, most likely without adequate support or training, and crashed & burned. Others come from misinformed perspectives. Below I address five of these myths, from my own perspective, borne from a school and system that has successfully implemented PBL in an already successful school corporation. __________________ “Project Based Learning isn’t for everyone.” I’ve heard it many times: my son just needs a textbook. My daughter just needs to be told what to do. He can’t work with others. She just needs structure. All students have their own needs, and no one teacher or system is going to change that. Project Based Learning doesn’t replace good teaching; it does, however, lend itself well to co- existing with research- based approaches. While there are most certainly a myriad of approaches that could be integrated with PBL, the one adopted by our district is Universal Design for Learning. UDL is a framework of brain- based instruction that benefits all learners regardless of ability or learner style. It may have started as a set of strategies for providing accommodations for some, but ultimately, all learners benefit. It should be reiterated that this approach was not adopted by just our school, which is project- based, but was instead implemented on a compulsory basis by all schools in our district. It turns out that PBL in particular fits naturally (incredibly so, in fact) into two of the three categories: Engagement (students that seek meaning and motivation in their learning get that from PBL because of the authentic learning experiences that its presents) and Action & Expression (when students are given voice and choice with how their mastery of content is manifested in final products, they can communicate their learning in many ways, instead of a prescribed and possibly one- dimensional means.) The third category, Action and Expression, is squarely in the hands of the instructor. In other words, you have to be a good teacher and PBL won’t save you if you’re not. The point is that PBL can’t be done well without sound pedagogy, whatever that pedagogical approach is. It can provide a range of options for students to express their knowledge and skills, and can provide meaning to the learning where there perhaps was otherwise not. “I’m afraid that I won’t be able to hit all of the standards if I do PBL.” It’s been my experience that I am no more likely to run out of time than I ever was in my previous teaching life; that is to say, covering (or, as we like to say,uncovering) the standards is challenging regardless of the setting. My approach has always been to prioritize and clump. There may be a standard or two or three that doesn’t get due justice in my classes, but rest assured, it won’t be a “power standard”; it will be the minutiae, the high- minded semantics and “pet standards” (the ones written by a person clearly with an agenda) that get slighted. It’s true that there are processes involved in PBL that take time away from content instruction. For a given project, the “launch” and subsequent creation of groups, group contracts, etc. may take up to two days. At the end of a project, presentations may take a day or more. Reflection and celebration of successes are givens. However, meaningful project planning can result in better use of time if students are given skills in collaborating and have access to abundant, high- quality information. If a project is well- planned, students may work in a self- paced way and avoid wasting time waiting on others to catch up with them. Benchmarks provide the opportunities for instructors to assess which groups are ready to forge on, and provided the resources are in place, students may at the least test their ability to explore on their own and never be held back. “PBL is great, but it’s not really preparing them for the college learning environment.” I couldn’t disagree more. The tendency for college work to involve more group projects is an emerging reality, but it’s the opposite end of the approach spectrum that creates more concern for me. There are those that feel lectures and traditional note taking have no place in a PBL environment. I am not among them. Never would I say that daily instruction should be done stand- and- deliver style excessively, but sometimes, every student truly and honestly needs the direct instruction. And truly, if we are not asking students to practice note taking and developing attention spans suited to listening for, say, 30 minutes at a time, we are doing them a disservice. The point is that there is no single instructional approach that is, quintessentially, PBL. Just like with any effective instructional approach, variety matters, immensely. “I’m not ready to give up all of the control in my classroom.” Nor am I. There is no substitute for good instruction, and those of us that do PBL do not go forth carelessly, letting the kids decide what they will learn, in what order, and how they’ll be taught. It’s quite true that one of the greatest things about PBL is that students do assume more ownership in their learning, in terms of how best to communicate and apply content in ways and contexts that are meaningful to them. It should not be forgotten, though, that we are the content experts, not them. It’s our job to provide structure and sequence to a project in such a way that students move logically through a set of concepts, all the time applying their new knowledge to solve the authentic problem at hand. There is a change in dynamic that occurs as a result of a well- executed project launch, where students identify their “Need to Knows” about the problem, scenario, and logistics of a project. Those Need to Knows, coming from the students as they do, help eliminate the perennial question of, “Why do we need to learn this?” That is, because the students express a particular Need to Know, there is an implicitly closer identification of how the content helps them solve a problem. That being said, students generally don’t know how to sequence and structure the learning of that content. That job belongs in the hands of a qualified expert (i.e. the teacher.) Giving up that control would be a big mistake. Never—ever—should a project be allowed to veer away from content standards for any extended period (though I cannot put a hard number on that exact duration.) If it does, we run the risk of improperly preparing our students for their next steps in school and life. As a general rule, time devoted to standards in a project is equal to the time that would otherwise be given in a traditional approach. We cannot change the reality of time and minutes, so we must pace appropriately. If a project is allowed to languish in purgatory, no one is either happy or appropriately educated in the end. This leads us to the last one…. “PBL isn’t rigorous enough.” PBL, by my personal definition, is the application of content standards to solve a real- world problem that matters. Application is, by definition, and requires, by necessity, higher- order thinking and problem solving skills. Content standards are viewed as the minimum proficiencies. So how is that not rigorous? If the quantity of information that students learn takes second seat to the quality, then I’m of the “so be it” mind. But again, it comes back to the original definition: standards are, truly, the minimum. My colleague Rachelle Antcliff likes to say, “I love standards; I look at them and ask, ‘Is this all I have to teach?’” In a traditional classroom, the answer is, “Yes.” In a PBL environment, the answer is, “Um, no. They have to learn the standards, apply them to the authentic context to solve a problem, communicate their knowledge to community partners in a number of ways, while working together as a team, struggling with decisions, and meet numerous deadlines along the way.” ____________________ So, am I biased in my dispelling of these “PBL Myths?” Perhaps, but only because seven years of experience has taught me what PBL can be, should be, and will be, for the rest of my educational career. I know that PBL is a daunting change in mindset to undergo because I did it and have seen many others do so as well. The only advice I can offer is (to borrow from Boromir from “The Lord of the Rings” and countless internet memes) “One does not simply implement PBL without the proper training and support.” Check out Magnify Learning for training opportunities and resources, and enjoy the journey.
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Top 100 Education Blogs for Educators and Teachers 2016!

Top 100 Education Blogs for Educators and Teachers 2016! | Teaching and Learning | Scoop.it
Check out the top 100 education blogs to stay up to date on what people are talking about in the education space. This list is a resource to help educators and those in the field of education find the most relevant blogs from across the Web. It is compiled based on number of ranking factors such as LIST OF TOP 100 EDUCATION BLOGS ORDERED BY POPULARITY #1: THE LEARNING NETWORK The New York Times Learning Network is a free blog for teachers, students and parents that provides teaching and learning materials and ideas based on New York Times content. #2: MINDSHIFT Technology is revolutionizing the world of education – replacing familiar classroom tools and changing the way we learn. MindShift explores the future of learning in all its dimensions – covering cultural and technology trends, groundbreaking research, education policy and more. The site is curated by Tina Barseghian, a journalist and the mother of a grade-schooler. #3: ALAN SINGER (HUFFINGTON POST) Alan Singer is a social studies educator in the Department of Curriculum and Teaching at Hofstra University in Long Island, New York and the editor of Social Science Docket (a joint publication of the New York and New Jersey Councils for Social Studies). #4: TEACHTHOUGHT TeachThought’s mantra is simple: learn better. Our mission is modest enough–to create a modern enlightenment that results in healthy communities and truly interdependent citizens. #5: THE CHRONICLE OF HIGHER EDUCATION Weekly news and job-information source for college and university faculty members, administrators, and students. #6: INSIDE HIGHER ED Free Higher Education News, Jobs, Career Advice and Events for college and university faculty, adjuncts, graduate students, and administrators. #7: EDUCATIONAL TECHNOLOGY AND MOBILE LEARNING A resource of educational web tools and mobile apps for teachers and educators. #8: EDUDEMIC The goal of Edudemic is to connect teachers, administrators, students, and just about everyone else with the best technology on the planet. A modest goal, to be sure. Started in April 2010 by Jeff Dunn, Edudemic has grown to become one of the leading education technology sites on the web. With more than 500,000 unique monthly visitors, it’s become a vibrant forum of discussion, discovery, and knowledge. #9: CLASSROOM Q&A WITH LARRY FERLAZZO An award-winning English and Social Studies teacher at Luther Burbank High School in Sacramento, Calif., Larry Ferlazzo is the author of Helping Students Motivate Themselves: Practical Answers To Classroom Challenges, The ESL/ELL Teacher’s Survival Guide, and Building Parent Engagement In Schools. In this EdWeek blog, an experiment in knowledge-gathering, he will address readers’ questions on classroom management, ELL instruction, lesson planning, and other issues facing teachers. #10: THE ANSWER SHEET A school survival guide for parents (and everyone else), by Valerie Strauss. #11: FACULTY FOCUS Through its free e-newsletter and dedicated website, Faculty Focus publishes articles on effective teaching strategies for the college classroom — both face-to-face and online. Faculty Focus was created in 2003 by Magna Publications. #12: CLASSROOM 2.0 The community for educators using Web 2.0 and collaborative technologies! #13: TEACHER NETWORK BLOG Latest Teacher Network news, comment and analysis from the Guardian, the world’s leading liberal voice. #14: HOMEROOM Blog articles provide insights on the activities of schools, programs, grantees, and other education stakeholders to promote continuing discussion of educational innovation and reform. #15: FREE TECHNOLOGY FOR TEACHERS The purpose of this site is to share information about free resources that teachers can use in their classrooms. #16: THE INNOVATIVE EDUCATOR This blog is to share ideas and resources with teachers, parents, and young people. This community supports those interested in sharing ideas about learning in ways that are innovative and relevant to generation text. #17: FREE ELEARNING RESOURCES The eLearning Industry contains eLearning, Instructional Design, and Training jobs, comprehensive articles on how to use the best eLearning tools, reviews of the latest eLearning industry research, and advice direct from the world’s eLearning experts. #18: THE FUTURE OF EDUCATION Conversations on teaching and learning in a networked world. #19: ON SPECIAL EDUCATION Tracks news and trends of interest to the special education community, including administrators, teachers, and parents. #20: BRILLIANT OR INSANE: EDUCATION ON THE EDGE This blog covers most education topics, with edgy opinion about education technology, innovation, leadership, social media integration, progressive education practices, assessment and much more. #21: DISCOVERY EDUCATOR NETWORK (DEN BLOGS) The Discovery Educator Network (DEN) is a global community of educators passionate about teaching with digital media, sharing resources, collaborating, and networking. #22: BUSY TEACHER Free printable worksheets and lesson plans for every busy teacher. Find printable worksheets on any topic: vocabulary, grammar, listening, reading, writing and speaking! #23: THE HECHINGER REPORT Covering inequality and innovation in education with in-depth journalism that uses research, data and stories from classrooms and campuses to show the public how education can be improved and why it matters. #24: TECH & LEARNING For over 30 years, Tech & Learning has served the K-12 education community with practical resources and expert strategies for transforming education through integration of digital technologies. #25: THE PRINCIPAL OF CHANGE Stories of learning and leading #26: EDUWONK The blog focuses mostly on education policy and politics written by Andrew J. Rotherham, Co-founder and Partner at Bellwether Education Partners. #27: FINDING COMMON GROUND Elementary school Principal Peter DeWitt writes about students’ social and emotional health, and how educators can help young people find common ground. #28: THE JOSE VILSON Get the freshest essays on race, class, and education #29: COOL CAT TEACHER BLOG Resources, information, and tools for teachers including global collaboration from a classroom teacher. #30: DIANE RAVITCH’S BLOG A site to discuss better education for all #31: @TEACHERTOOLKIT TeacherToolkit is designed to equip teachers with practical ideas that save time and impact of teacher and student development. #32: LARRY FERLAZZO’S WEBSITES OF THE DAY… Larry shares daily web resources, classroom lessons, updates on the latest education-related research, and educational policy links. Many relate to teaching English Language Learners, and others related to mainstream K-12 teachers and students. #33: GETTING SMART Getting Smart is a community passionate around innovations in learning across K-12, higher education, and post-secondary education. #34: DROPOUT NATION Commentary on America’s dropout crisis and education reform written by editorialist RiShawn Biddle. #35: EDUCATION NEWS A Global Leading News Source covering educational, political, business, and environmental issues. #36: EDSURGE EdSurge is an independent information resource and community for everyone involved in education technology. We aim to help educators discover the best products and how to use them and to inspire developers to build what educators and learners need. #37: TCHERS’ VOICE Teaching Channel’s mission is to create an environment where teachers can watch, share, and learn new techniques to help every student grow. #38: DAILY EDVENTURES Daily Edventures is the blog of Microsoft Corp.’s Vice President of Education, Anthony Salcito. He works with education institutions and partners globally to embrace technology to optimize learning environments and student achievement, and he oversees Microsoft’s partnership and technology outreach efforts via the Worldwide Partners in Learning, Shape the Future, and Public and Private Alliances programs. Anthony posts daily, spotlighting the everyday heroes in education that he meets on the road. #39: INFORMED InformED is your learning and ideas hub. This is a portal for you to hunt-and-gather training news and industry insights in the universe of eLearning and Education Technology. #40: MIDDLEWEB Providing resources for teachers, school leaders, parents and others interested in the success of young adolescents. #41: EDUTOPIA You’ll find practical classroom strategies and tips from real educators, as well as lesson ideas, personal stories, and innovative approaches to improving your teaching practice. #42: EDUCATION FUTURES Emerging Trends and Technologies in K-12 #43: CLOAKING INEQUITY Blog by Julian Vasquez Heilig who is an award-winning researcher and teacher. He is currently a Professor of Educational Leadership and Policy Studies and the Director of the Doctorate in Educational Leadership at California State University Sacramento. #44: EMERGINGEDTECH Using Internet & Instructional Technologies to Engage Students and Enhance Learning Outcomes. Includes Many Free Tools and Resources. #45: SMARTBLOG ON EDUCATION We publish original content for several business verticals: executive leadership and management, social media marketing, education, food and beverage, and finance. #46: ILEARN TECHNOLOGY An Edublog about integrating technology in the classroom #47: TEACHER TECH #48: TEACHER IN A STRANGE LAND Nancy Flanagan is an education writer and consultant focusing on teacher leadership. #49: FRACTUS LEARNING Our goal is to inspire, excite and enhance the teaching skill set by the use of technology, making sure teachers are always on the cutting edge. #50: NEA TODAY News and Features from the National Education Association #51: TEACH LIKE A CHAMPION Reflections on teaching, literacy, coaching, and practice. #52: LES OUTILS TICE News about Tice tools for the classroom by Fidel Navamuel #53: ELEARNING INFOGRAPHICS The No.1 Source for the Best Education Infographics #54: KLEINSPIRATION Amazing blog by Erin Klein. Erin Klein is a teacher, author, and parent who has earned her Master’s of Education in Curriculum and Instruction and currently teaches second grade. #55: DANGEROUSLY IRRELEVANT Our intelligence tends to produce technological and social change at a rate faster than our institutions and emotions can cope with. . . . We therefore find ourselves continually trying to accommodate new realities within inappropriate existing institutions, and trying to think about those new realities in traditional but sometimes dangerously irrelevant terms. #56: A PRINCIPAL’S REFLECTIONS Education is a reflective practice. This blog provides my views on educational leadership, effective technology integration, best practices, and creating a student-centered learning culture. #57: TEACHERCAST TeacherCast is designed for both the seasoned teacher who is searching for some great resources as well as the teacher who is a unsure how to start incorporating newly developed 21st-Century skills. #58: LIFE OF AN EDUCATOR “Life of an Educator” is the personal blog of Justin Tarte. Here I will share my thoughts on education in an effort to improve schools by helping Educators to reflect upon their current practices and beliefs. The opinions expressed here represent my own and may or may not represent those of my current employer. #59: THE CANADIAN HOMESCHOOLER Helping Canadian homeschoolers find resources, products and information that are from a Canadian point of view and/or available to us. #60: BLOGGING THROUGH THE FOURTH DIMENSION Pernille is a passionate former 4th and 5th, now 7th grade teacher with “tech geek” tendencies. She’s creator of the Global Read Aloud Project, a global literacy inititive that has connected more than 500,000 students in the past 5 years, and Co-founder of EdCamp MadWI. #61: BLOGGING ABOUT THE WEB 2.0 CONNECTED CLASSROOM Blogging About The Web 2.0 Connected Classroom is a blend of technology integration with conversations centered around leading and learning, in and out of the classroom. Check it out to learn about social media for professional growth, mobile devices in the classroom, technology leadership and more. #62: STEVE HARGADON Education, Technology, Social Media, and You! #63: CATLIN TUCKER, BLENDED LEARNING & TECHNOLOGY IN THE CLASSROOM Catlin Tucker is a Google Certified Teacher, bestselling author, international trainer, and frequent Edtech speaker, who currently teaches in Sonoma County where she was named Teacher of the Year in 2010. #64: THE LEARNING SPY Blog Description by the Author: In 2011, frustrated by the current state of education I began to blog. Since then I have expressed the constraints and irritations of ordinary teachers, detailed the successes and failures of my classroom and synthesised my 15 years of teaching experienced through the lens of education research and cognitive psychology. The Learning Spy is widely recognised as one of the most influential education blogs in the UK and has won a number of awards. #65: SCHOOL FINANCE 101 Data and thoughts on public and private school funding in the U.S. #66: ASK A TECH TEACHER This blog comes from a group of tech ed teachers who work together to offer you tech tips, advice, pedagogic discussion, lesson plans, and anything else we can think of to help you integrate tech into your classroom. #67: THINK INCLUSIVE Think Inclusive is dedicated to inclusive schools and communities for everyone. #68: EDTECHREVIEW EdTechReview (ETR) is a community for educators and learners where they can find useful news, insights, product reviews, resources, events, training and consultation on education technology to improve teaching, learning and hence education, by the right use of technology. #69: THE CORNERSTONE FOR TEACHERS Practical ideas that make teaching more effective, efficient, & enjoyable #70: ESCHOOL NEWS This website connects you to all the latest news, information, and resources on how today’s educators are using technology to advance learning. #71: CLASS STRUGGLE Jay Mathews is an education columnist and blogger for the Washington Post. He has won several awards for education writing and was given the Upton Sinclair award as “a beacon of light in the realm of education.” #72: E-LEARNING, CONOCIMIENTO EN RED Y WEB COLECTIVA Notes on elearning, tics, internet and web collective #73: CLASS TECH TIPS Education Technology Resources and Ideas for PreK-12 Teachers. #74: TEACHERTUBE Our goal is to provide an online community for sharing instructional videos. #75: E-LEARNING PROVOCATEUR Blog Desc from the Author: I use this blog as a vehicle for my thinking. By presenting my thoughts to the world, I need to understand them and articulate them effectively for others to understand. And if other people learn something from my insights and experiences, then I’m delighted. #76: FORMACIÓN ONLINE Free online courses, tutorials, guides and books for distance learning in 2015. #77: EDUCATING FOR DEMOCRACY BY JOEL SHATZKY #78: TEACHING NOW This blog explores the latest news, ideas, and resources for teacher leaders. Coverage runs the gamut from the inspirational to the infuriating, from practical classroom tips to raging policy debates. #79: THE EDUBLOGGER We scoured the web to find our five favorite pro tips for writing better posts, getting more comments, and helping your students get the most educational value out of their blogs. #80: SHANKER BLOG The Albert Shanker Institute is a nonprofit organization established in 1998 to honor the life and legacy of the late president of the American Federation of Teachers. The organization’s by-laws commit it to four fundamental principles —vibrant democracy, quality public education, a voice for working people in decisions affecting their jobs and their lives, and free and open debate about all of these issues.—that is the vision, the mission, and the method of the Albert Shanker Institute. #81: SMART CLASSROOM MANAGEMENT Simply effective tips and strategies for classroom management #82: ANGELA MAIERS I believe that learning is a lifelong journey. I speak, write and guide organizations to harness the power of literacy, communication and social technologies. This site is an ongoing presentation of conversations along my learning path. #83: TOP PERFORMERS An Education Week blog from, Marc Tucker, the president of the National Center on Education and the Economy. #84: NYC EDUCATORS #85: SCISTARTER BLOG SciStarter brings together the millions of citizen scientists in the world; the thousands of projects offered by researchers, organizations, and companies; and the resources, products, and services that enable citizens to pursue and enjoy these activities. #86: TEACHER REBOOT CAMP BY SHELLY TERRELL Join Shelly Terrell in discussing strategies for engaging all learners through effective instructional methods and technology. #87: THE DARING LIBRARIAN Bringing Timely Ed-Tech Talk With Sparkly & Snarky Sweet Freshness! #88: ASCD IN SERVICE The international education association dedicated to providing programs, products, and services that empower educators to support the success of each learner. #89: SIMPLY CHARLY Simply Charly offers students, teachers and other interested parties an original, one-stop portal to a wealth of information about some of the world’s most prominent historical figures. The site’s mission is to become the leading online source for everything our visitors want to know about the groundbreaking individuals we feature. #90: READ.WRITE.CONNECT.LEARN Welcome! I’m Will Richardson, parent, educator, speaker, author, 12-year blogger at Weblogg-ed and now here. I’m trying to answer the question “What happens to schools and classrooms and learning in a 2.0 world?” #91: EDUWELLS I provide professional development in both pedagogy and technology and speak on matters of future focused education. #92: THIRTY DAYS OF AUTISM 30 Days of Autism is a project designed to promote social understanding and offer a glimpse into the perspectives of those whose lives are touched by ASD. #93: KHAN ACADEMY Our blogs include information about Khan Academy, new resource offerings, general thoughts on education, and life at Khan Academy. #94: CULT OF PEDAGOGY Visit our blog to discuss and solve problems, share ideas, and support the growth of other educators. #95: EDUCATIONAL TECHNOLOGY GUY Free resources for teachers, educational ideas and tips, educational topics, Personal Learning Networks, Project Based Learning, Google, Evernote, Discovery Education and more. #96: GADFLY ON THE WALL BLOG Education advocacy. #97: THE NEW TECH EXCHANGE The New Tech design provides an instructional approach centered on project-based learning, a culture that empowers students and teachers, and integrated technology in the classroom. Our hands-on, multi-year approach gives schools structure and support to ensure long-term success. #98: PRESCHOOL MATTERS Preschool Matters … Today! is the blog companion to NIEER’s website, which serves the important function of reporting on research, policy, and practice for a large and growing audience of educators, policymakers, journalists, advocates, and parents. #99: DAVID TRUSS :: PAIR-A-DIMES FOR YOUR THOUGHTS Reflections on Education, Technology and Learning #100: SCIENCE CHEERLEADER Darlene Cavalier founded the Science Cheerleader to unite the citizen’s desire to be heard and valued, the scientist’s growing interest in the public’s involvement, and government’s need to garner public support. The Science Cheerleader serves to get the conversation going, rally the troops, solicit views from all sides and change the tone of science and science policy in this country. Learn more about Feedspot
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Creating a Generation of Innovators via The Lea...

Creating a Generation of Innovators via The Lea... | Teaching and Learning | Scoop.it
Innovation is very much on the agenda in Australia and globally. The OECD publishes lists of nations most likely to succeed through innovation and nations seek to encourage increased innovation to maintain their competitive edge. The result of this in Australia is the recent launch of a new ‘Innovation Australia’ policy with wide reaching measures to encourage and foster a culture of innovation. Education has a role to play in this process acting an an enabler of innovation that builds capacity in future generations. 'Our education system, therefore, must equip students to be successful entrepreneurs, hold a diverse number of jobs or work across a number of industries.’ (www.innovation.gov.au) STEM is one of the key enablers identified by the government and an area to be targeted in efforts to enhance the nation’s capacity for innovation. Along with Digital Literacy and programmes specifically targeting STEM to girls, it is clear that innovation is seen in a somewhat narrow way. What is needed is a broad culture of innovation where diverse skills and dispositions merge to offer the best chance of a unique idea emerging and importantly making it to market. Significantly the definition of innovation very much includes the ability to deliver on the imaginative ideas Australians are known for but are presently handing off to international developers to capitalise on. For schools such a definition is useful as it encourages a shift away from vague conversations about creativity and imagination and looks at how these skills can be used in ways that bring about change. With a shift to innovation we should see students engaged in a process of ideation that results in practical solutions to problems they identify and engage with. A creative process powered by imagination, inquiry, design and a well considered ‘So What’ question that encourages students to do something innovative with their ideas. But all this talk about innovation in schools brings a new set of challenges to already time poor teachers. What will this look like in the classroom? What skills and dispositions will our students require? What strategies might we employ to foster innovation? Innovation requires a pedagogy that values a student focused learning processes over teacher directed transfer of knowledge. Teaching for innovation is by nature messy and imprecise. In the short term results on traditional assessments may not be what we would expect from traditional methods but if we desire to produce innovators this needs to be accepted. It is also to be expected that learning to think innovatively will initially unsettle some learners, some who may have thrived under conditions where learning routines and adding to their knowledge bank was the norm. This will need to be accommodated and while challenging for all lets not pretend that traditional methods were providing the conditions necessary for every child to shine. The key elements to aim for might be something like the list below. These are the elements of effective teaching with an aim to encouraging students to find and solve problems. Innovation is likely to be enabled in classrooms that promote these ways of thinking and learning. Nothing here is new but it is interesting to bring together a set of ideas discussed elsewhere on this site around the theme of innovation. 1. Student Choice - Students are not likely to develop innovative ideas in an environment where the ideas and the focus of their thinking is dictated by their teacher. Students need to make choices about what they are learning and how they are learning for at least part of their day. Choice allows students to pursue their passions and that brings a greatly heightened level of engagement. – For more read ‘Learning by Choice: 10 ways choice and differentiation create an engaged learning experience for every student by A.J. Juliani’ 2. Question Finding & Ideation - Students need opportunities to seek out big meaty questions that matter to them. True innovation comes from finding answers to questions that have not previously been answered, questions that may not have been asked. Encouraging students to find their ‘Beautiful Question’ should be one of our prime goals if we hope to build innovators. – For more visit - 'A More Beautiful Question' or 'The Questions that Matter Most' or 'Questions that Encourage Deeper Thinking' 3. Risk Taking and Failing - A Growth Mindset - If the goal is innovation you are unlikely to get it right the first time. Our students need to understand that failing and learning from our mistakes is an important part of the process of innovation. Building a ‘Growth Mindset’ will help build the required resilience and allow students to see their failed attempts as a rewarding part of the learning process. – For more visit ‘Promoting a Growth Mindset’ 4. Turning Ideas into Reality - Making Mindset and Toolset - Creativity and imagination are wonderful and should be encouraged but innovation is driven by putting an idea into practice. More often than not this process is going to involve making something and it is in this process that we find out if great idea is going to work our needs some more planning. Students need experience with making to have an understanding of the processes that go into the products we use. Thinking with your hands brings a new way of seeing the world and for innovators that new perspective can lead to the required breakthrough – For more visit ‘Making as Problem Based Learning’ 5. Creativity & Critical Thinking - Essential elements for innovation and it is not an accident that they are often lumped together. The trick is to know when to let our creativity run the show and when to allow our critical brain to put the brake on. For more visit - 'Creating & Innovating' 6. Collaboration - We have a vision of innovators working in isolation. The lone genius who discovers the next big thing. Innovators like Steve Jobs and Thomas Edison are largely to blame for this concept but the reality is even they worked as part of a team. Collaboration and the ability to develop ideas in a team is essential and something our students need practice at. For more visit 'Thinking Interdependently' 7. Thinking Skills and Metacognition - Thinking in general is something we do not do well but it is a skill that can be improved. Habits of Mind, making Thinking Visible, Thinkers Hats and Keys are all tools that will allow students to develop their skills for thinking. Metacognition or ‘thinking about thinking’ will help students to analyse their thought process and understand the decisions they are making. – For more visit ‘Encouraging Metacognition for Learning’ or 'Thinking about your Thinking' 8. Understanding of Design Cycle and Valuing Process over Product - The design cycle is used by innovators because it works. Having a structure for the process of innovation brings focus and helps us to stay on track. We often say we need to think outside the box but as Ewen McIntosh points out ‘We need the box’ if the box is a structure that helps us develop our ideas from raw imaginings into something useful. – For more visit ‘An Introduction to Design' 9. A STEM Foundation - This might not be required for every innovative idea but increasingly it will play a part in many of them. Understanding the fundamentals of STEM, knowing what is and isn’t possible and being able to speak the language of technologists and engineers will ease the process of bringing many ideas into fruition. – For more visit ‘Is STEM the Key?’ 10. Role Models - If our students are going to think like innovators they need exposure to innovative thinkers. As teachers we need to allow our students to see the innovative thinking we do. Along with this they need to see us make mistakes and engage in a process of evaluating where things went wrong. Reaching out to the community, making connections with universities and industry are other ways of bringing innovators and innovative thinking into the classroom. One easy way towards this is through the CSIROs ‘Scientists and Mathematicians in Schools’ programme. For more visit ‘Creativity in Science and Technology: CREST’ 11. Empathy - Lastly but possibly most importantly our students need empathy. If we are to innovate towards a better world it starts with empathy. For more visit ‘The Cultivation of Empathy’ Developing an innovators mindset takes years of exposure to this way of thinking. After years of teacher led learning in school and then university it is too much to expect a young graduate to suddenly shift gears. We need to allow our students to experience the innovators mindset while they are young and we need to enrich our students' capacity for innovation before they enter High School. Our students start school with the imagination they need for innovation, we need to add the processes that will allow them to turn their ideas into the next big thing. | iGeneration - 21st Century Education (Pedagogy & Digital Innovation)
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Why a Growth Mindset is Crucial to Learning | Edudemic

Why a Growth Mindset is Crucial to Learning | Edudemic | Teaching and Learning | Scoop.it
The belief that we are born being good at certain things and bad at other things is called a fixed mindset.
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Become a Listening Educator: How to Hear and Connect to Your Students | Edudemic

Become a Listening Educator: How to Hear and Connect to Your Students | Edudemic | Teaching and Learning | Scoop.it
No matter how much you love your students, it’s not an easy task with so many of them in front of you and so many duties to balance.
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Three Effective Techniques for Brainstorming Ideas | Edudemic

Three Effective Techniques for Brainstorming Ideas | Edudemic | Teaching and Learning | Scoop.it
One important skill for succeeding in school is coming up with new and creative ideas. The best ideas are ones that solve problems or make our lives easier.
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Top 10 Education Systems in the World | Edudemic

Top 10 Education Systems in the World | Edudemic | Teaching and Learning | Scoop.it
Every three years, the Programme of International Student Assessment conducts an assessment of educational programs provided in countries across the world.
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These Videos Could Change How You Think About Teaching #learning #highered #edtech

These Videos Could Change How You Think About Teaching #learning #highered #edtech | Teaching and Learning | Scoop.it
Michael Wesch believes that college teaching should transform the learner. He’s sharing that philosophy through short videos on his new website, My Teaching Notebook.

Via John Shank
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Introduction to Psychology

Introduction to Psychology | Teaching and Learning | Scoop.it
This is a video lecture course on Introduction to Psychology by John Gabrieli of Massachusetts Institute of Technology.
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The Ultimate Guide to Gamifying Your Classroom

The Ultimate Guide to Gamifying Your Classroom | Teaching and Learning | Scoop.it
No one wants to been seen as the stuffy teacher stuck in the past who lectures from the front of the classroom and doesn’t seem to care about student engagement. Students today are tech savvy and have wandering minds.
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Cultural Psychology

Cultural Psychology | Teaching and Learning | Scoop.it
This video lecture series on Cultural Psychology by Professor Herb Agan discusses about relationship between ethnicity, socialization, personality, behavior issues related to current race relations...........
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Introduction to Clinical Psychology

Introduction to Clinical Psychology | Teaching and Learning | Scoop.it
This video lecture series on Introduction to Clinical Psychology by Professor Edward Sheridan is a survey of the science and practice of clinical psychology and its specialty areas, including discussions or diagnoses and evaluations,...
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