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Portraits of people living on a dollar a day

Portraits of people living on a dollar a day | Teachers Toolbox | Scoop.it

"More than a billion people around the world subsist on a dollar a day, or less. The reasons differ but the day-to-day hardship of their lives are very similar. A book by Thomas A Nazario, founder of the International Organisation, documents the circumstances of those living in extreme poverty across the globe, accompanied by photographs from Pulitzer prizewinner Renée C Byer. Living On A Dollar a Day is published by Quantuck Lane."


Via Seth Dixon
Ms. Harrington's insight:

Extreme poverty is defined by the World Bank living on under $1.25 per day.  The geography of of extreme poverty highly uneven--two thirds of the extremely poor live in just 5 countries (India, China, Nigeria, Bangladesh and DR Congo)   - Seth Dixon

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Joy Kinley's curator insight, June 16, 3:21 PM

Poverty is nothing new but in the last hundred years the gulf between those that have money and those that don't has become almost insurmountable.  The lack of support systems that many in the West take for granted is absent in many developing countries.  

 

Access to education and health care are vital if these situations are to ever improve. 

Rianne Tolsma's curator insight, June 18, 7:07 AM

add your insight...

MsPerry's curator insight, August 25, 4:47 PM

APHG-Unit 2 & Unit 6

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Globalization and the Textile Industry

"On the 100th anniversary of the Triangle Shirtwaist Factory Fire, little has changed in the global sweatshop economy. Workers are again trapped and burned to death behind locked exit gates."


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Kelly Collinsworth's curator insight, April 16, 8:42 AM

For Beth Manor

Courtney Barrowman's curator insight, April 24, 11:28 AM

unit 6

Danielle Bellefeuille's curator insight, May 10, 6:16 PM

The sad reality of the new division of labor, we are moving backwards instead of forwards with labor policies and widening the gap between core and periphery countries. We need to stand up and advocate for fair trade. These countries rely on us for sources of unemployment, and we need to give them better wages, safer working conditions, and help them push pass this dependency, and grow into more economically and socially strong countries.

 

http://www.laborrights.org

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Mapping Poverty in America

Mapping Poverty in America | Teachers Toolbox | Scoop.it

“ Data from the Census Bureau show where the poor live.”


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T-Shirt Travels

When filmmaker Shantha Bloemen was stationed in a remote village in Zambia as a worker with an international aid organization, she had to adjust to living in a different culture. But one thing struck her as oddly familiar: almost everyone in the village wore secondhand clothing from the West. Bloemen began to imagine stories about the people who used to wear the clothing, wondering if the original owners had any idea that the castoffs they had given to charities ended up being sold to Africans half a world away.


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Mr Ortloff's curator insight, October 8, 2013 12:44 PM

Is direct aid a good thing or not? How does secondhand clothing impact local economies?

Jess Deady's curator insight, May 4, 3:57 PM

Westernization is a popular theme thats happening in the East. Even though people don't know it, the clothes they give away may be some that are taken to places like Africa. Hand-me-downs are popular in the U.S. but even more so in Africa. The t-shirt you give away to someone might end up across the world. Who knows.

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Inside North Korea

Go undercover with National Geographic correspondent Lisa Ling as she journeys into mysterious and reclusive North Korea.

 

We know so little about life in North Korea since they have the world’s least free press (that is not hyperbole--Freedom House ranks countries from 0 to 99 with 0 being the most free and 99 being the least free.  North Korea has recently "improved" its rating to 97, the worst in the world). Official coverage is highly censored and filled with government propaganda. This 2009 glimpse is incredibly poignant.

 

Tags: East Asia, development, states, poverty.


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Where the extremely poor live

Where the extremely poor live | Teachers Toolbox | Scoop.it

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dilaycock's curator insight, May 5, 8:52 PM

This information is taken from the World Bank's 2014 report "Prosperity for All." The report looks at "progress to date in reducing global poverty and discusses some of the challenges of reaching the interim target of reducing global poverty to 9 percent by 2020.... . It also reports on the goal of promoting shared prosperity, with a particular focus on describing various characteristics of the bottom 40 percent."

Sid McIntyre-DeLaMelena's curator insight, May 29, 12:48 PM

This graphic reveals the poorest populations and where they live and even though India and China are economic competitors on the global stage they still have the poorest communities. 

IN poor communities, the human place is changed by using less structurally sound architecture and disregarding cultural presence for functionality though holding true to cultural presence in individual lives.

Amanda Morgan's curator insight, September 18, 11:49 AM

I agree with this article from the Guardian that development should be measured in human rights gains more than economic advancements.  While globalization is taking place and allowing countries to trade and maximize profits, a large percent of people in the world are deprived basic human rights and are entirely forgotten about and not valued.

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An Atlas of Poverty

An Atlas of Poverty | Teachers Toolbox | Scoop.it
We think we know what poverty looks like. But how do we accurately account for it? How do we know where to look?
Poverty maps are one place to begin. Technological advances of the past decade—the increased capability to both collect and process improved data—make it possible to reveal the face of the poor in finer detail than ever before. By translating data into the visual accessibility of a map, we can locate poverty more precisely, understand its sources more comprehensively—and attack it more effectively. Such maps can even be used to monitor the results of anti-poverty efforts. Poverty maps can be part of a strong, new foundation for building and tailoring policies and programs, to reach those people that will benefit the most.
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Nancy Watson's curator insight, March 9, 8:27 PM

This is very revealing

Sieg Holle's curator insight, March 10, 9:10 PM

solutions anyone......

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Inequality and the Gini Coefficient

Inequality and the Gini Coefficient | Teachers Toolbox | Scoop.it
Think everyone should just pull themselves up by their bootstraps? Try this one on for size.

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Ms. Harrington's insight:

Educating in poverty

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Anne Gray's curator insight, October 12, 2013 12:37 PM

See the dark blue in Arizona? That is where the Native Americans are.

Heidi Hutchison's curator insight, October 12, 2013 1:46 PM

Just incredibly awesome, but so, so sadly true.

Alison D. Gilbert's curator insight, October 16, 2013 7:47 AM

Do you find this information surprising?

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A Life Revealed

A Life Revealed | Teachers Toolbox | Scoop.it
Seventeen years after she stared out from the cover of National Geographic, a former Afghan refugee comes face-to-face with the world once more.

 

The original cover is one of the more famous National Geographic photos of all time, and yet the woman in the photograph has not lived a life as though millions of people could recognize her eyes.  This is her story. 


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Jess Deady's curator insight, May 4, 10:00 AM

This is basically a publicity stunt. When someone puts a specific cover on a magazine, they are looking for a certain kind of attention. Yes, this woman has faced some hardships in her life but not the brutal and intense things that this magazine may have stirred up.

Amanda Morgan's curator insight, October 18, 3:49 PM

The image of the Afghan Girl is easily recognizable and greatly popular, even to those born after it was made the cover of an issue of National Geographic.   It is mind boggling that the Afghan Girl had no idea she was on the cover of one the most notable publications of our time.  It is disheartening that they sought to find her so long after the fact.  I can only imagine how much money that image drew in, and how little she received for being the muse.  The image now is still just as powerful, if not even more powerful.  Her experiences have taken their toll and it is evident.  Her eyes still are haunting, this time less with beauty and more with hardship.  The photos of her show that images can sometimes convey emotions and meaning far more than words ever could.

Shanelle Zaino's curator insight, October 22, 1:17 PM

This is an iconic image that we have all seen.In 1984 a picture of a young Afghan refugee was taken and in June 1985 it was placed on the cover of National Geographic Magazine. 17 years later in 2002 the young woman was tracked down.During this visit a recent image was captured (the first and last time she was photographer was that day in 1984). Her name is Sharbat Gula and she never knew the impact her photo had made. So cutoff from the modern world void of most of her identity she did not even know how old she was.When the photo was taken she was in a refugee camp ,along with the remnants of her family that had survived the Afghan war.In 2002 when a search was assembled to find the woman with the piercing green eyes , the National Geographic organization did not know if she was still alive.After passing around her photo they were able to locate Sharbat .Reluctant to be caught talking to foreigners and uneasy about taking another photo National Geographic explained to the woman how she had inspired people to help her country. Having considered that she was  helping her people Sharbat agreed. National Geographic also helped to provide her family with much needed healthcare.

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Photos that bear witness to modern slavery

TED Talks For the past two years, photographer Lisa Kristine has traveled the world, documenting the unbearably harsh realities of modern-day slavery.

 

This is a chilling glimpse into the worst and darkest side of the economic systems of geography and labor in the world. It is estimated that there are more than 25 million people who today live in state that can be described as modern-day slavery. We should not discuss slavery only in the past tense, and yet it conflicts with how most people conceptualize the world today.

 

Questions to Ponder: How can this even be happening in the 21st century? What geographic and economic forces lead to these situations portrayed in this TED talk? What realistically could be done to lessen the amount of slavery in the world today?

 

Tags: TED, labor, economic, class, poverty, South Asia, Africa, video.


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Kyle Toner's comment, November 6, 2012 12:17 PM
This video truly opened eyes into the conflict of modern day slavery. I had no idea just how prevalent, global and horrible this situation is.
Seth Dixon's curator insight, November 6, 2013 10:51 AM

This is a chilling glimpse into the worst and darkest side of the economic systems of geography and labor in the world. It is estimated that there are more than 25 million people who today live in state that can be described as modern-day slavery. We should not discuss slavery only in the past tense, and yet it conflicts with how most people conceptualize the world today.


Questions to Ponder: How can this even be happening in the 21st century? What geographic and economic forces lead to these situations portrayed in this TED talk? What realistically could be done to lessen the amount of slavery in the world today?


Tags: TED, labor, economic, class, poverty, South Asia, Africa, video.