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A Map of Baseball Nation

A Map of Baseball Nation | Teachers Toolbox | Scoop.it

"Fans may not list which team they favor on the census, but millions of them do make their preferences public on Facebook. Using aggregated data provided by the company, we were able to create an unprecedented look at the geography of baseball fandom, going down not only to the county level, as Facebook did in a nationwide map it released a few weeks ago, but also to ZIP codes."


Via Seth Dixon
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Brian Altonen's curator insight, April 25, 4:51 PM

Anything can be mapped.  

 

This mapping did not fully account for hybridization--for example when a friend in Texas is a Boston Red Sox fan.

Courtney Barrowman's curator insight, April 28, 7:43 AM

unit 1 & 3

Greg Russak's curator insight, April 29, 9:53 AM

Maps and baseball - a good combination!

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The Geography of Small Talk

The Geography of Small Talk | Teachers Toolbox | Scoop.it
Surprising alternatives to "so what do you do?"—from New Orleans to New York.

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Seth Dixon's curator insight, April 23, 4:48 PM

The types of questions that you ask when you are meeting someone new for the first time has some regional variations but there is much more to the geography of small talk than that as see in this 4 minute video.  People want to understand your cultural, ethnic, socioeconomic context by asking spatial questions about where you are from.  Identity and place are tightly woven and these neighborhood questions are almost invitations to share much more personal information, as if to ask, "how do you fit in this world?"  When you are being introduced to someone, what are the questions that you ask, and what type of information are you hoping to get?  Each person has their own little geography that has profoundly shaped who they are---so what’s your story? 


Tags: language, regions, folk cultures, communityplace, neighborhood.

Courtney Barrowman's curator insight, April 24, 6:43 AM

unit 2-3

Mr Steven Newman's curator insight, April 24, 11:33 AM
Love this scoop from Seth Dixon. A nice way to help kids understand sense of place .
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Place and Opinions

Place and Opinions | Teachers Toolbox | Scoop.it

Via Seth Dixon
Ms. Harrington's insight:

Sports and regions

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Seth Dixon's curator insight, March 30, 6:20 PM

Some deeply held opinions that individuals hold are rooted in the cultural and regional influences (even if they feel that they are being purely objective).  Sports fans though, are rarely objective and are often swayed by those opinions that they hear the most, which often come for those closest to us.  While we are on the subject of basketball and geography, you've got to try Population Bracketology, which challenges your knowledge on the sizes of Metropolitan Statistic Areas and state population.     


Tags: fun, sport, place.

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The Mystery House

"In Raleigh, N.C., there's a house... or what looks like a house. What's hidden inside is more important than most people realize. Read the story: http://wunc.org/post/video-whats-inside-house-wade-avenue "


Via Seth Dixon
Ms. Harrington's insight:

A great introduction to city planning

 

http://www.npr.org/blogs/thetwo-way/2014/01/17/263476645/whats-inside-this-mystery-house-in-north-carolina

 

 

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Joseph Thacker 's curator insight, January 24, 11:41 AM

That house on Wade Avenue appears to be your average home that a person would not look twice at. I am sure the people who are driving by this property everyday do not know that this is a water booster pump station. This is a clever and thoughtful idea by the government to think about the people living in this neighborhood, as they designed what could be a very non-appealing piece of property, into a secure and attractive water booster pump station. 

Lauren Stahowiak's curator insight, January 27, 1:11 PM

This short YouTube clip focuses on the Governments creative ways of keeping city planning out of the eyes of everyday people. Not only do these creative ways allow cities to remain unvandalised, but they also eliminate the eye sores of waterplants and towers. I think these ideas are great and allow communities to remain beautiful and inviting. 

Tracy Galvin's comment, January 30, 12:00 PM
This is a really nice example of a respect for the neighborhood. By disguising the building it doesn't create an eyesore in the community but will allow the plant to provide a service to the neighbors. This keeps property values high and the neighbors happy.
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Where Does the South Begin?

Where Does the South Begin? | Teachers Toolbox | Scoop.it
Roads? Religion? Accent? Food? Which factor dictates where the North ends?

 

This is a great intellectual expercise to help student think about regions and how we define them.  The article can help also inform some of their thinking since one of the main problems for students in drawing regional boundaries is a lack of place-based knowledge.   

 

Tags: regions, USA.


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Matthew DiLuglio's curator insight, October 12, 2013 3:49 PM

Borders... the first thing I think of was a giant bookstore near my hometown... it now ceases to exist, having been replaced by Barnes and Nobel...  As for the political organization of space, I could apply this situation and laugh.  Borders will cease to be, and they will be called after people's last names!  I think this has already happened, when people unite together in countries such as the USA- although borders are specific, the general federal laws and many policies still apply in all states... generally. And people's names are often the namesakes of places.  I don't like the idea of borders, though, it seems like a bunch of warmongers trying to get ahead in a world where they can't truly cheat death, so they cheat other people of land that may have been decreed in ancient documents as property of their ancestors, or even in accordance with the righteousness of the universe and what should be alloted to whom.  Ownership is a concept of denial, because no one can truly own anything, not even our bodies, which contain trillions of infinite universes the size of the large one around us that we commonly refer to.  Borders are relative, and will likely become recognized as obsolete.  I know this was abstract, but it's my thoughts on the topic.

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Why Are States So Red and Blue?

Why Are States So Red and Blue? | Teachers Toolbox | Scoop.it
Theories about our right-wing and left-wing mind-sets don't explain why they are tied to geography.

 

While not endorsing all the cultural assumptions in the article, this is still an interesting exploration into expalining why distinct places are are politically aligned with particular parties. 

 

Questions to ponder: What portions of the author's argument do you agree (or disagree) with?  What do you see as the reasons behind the spatial distributions of "blue" and "red" in the United States? 

 

Tags: political, place, USA, culture, unit 4 political.


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BraydenJulietteGeo's comment, November 21, 2013 10:26 AM
this is a extremely interesting article on how certain portions of our country are know for voting for certain political party's during presidential elections. We have seen this political pattern all through our history, and can now almost always guess what states will be red or blue when it comes time for elections. Because this talks about political party's I have put this under political
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The Geography of Small Talk

The Geography of Small Talk | Teachers Toolbox | Scoop.it
Surprising alternatives to "so what do you do?"—from New Orleans to New York.

Via Seth Dixon
more...
Seth Dixon's curator insight, April 23, 4:48 PM

The types of questions that you ask when you are meeting someone new for the first time has some regional variations but there is much more to the geography of small talk than that as see in this 4 minute video.  People want to understand your cultural, ethnic, socioeconomic context by asking spatial questions about where you are from.  Identity and place are tightly woven and these neighborhood questions are almost invitations to share much more personal information, as if to ask, "how do you fit in this world?"  When you are being introduced to someone, what are the questions that you ask, and what type of information are you hoping to get?  Each person has their own little geography that has profoundly shaped who they are---so what’s your story? 


Tags: language, regions, folk cultures, communityplace, neighborhood.

Courtney Barrowman's curator insight, April 24, 6:43 AM

unit 2-3

Mr Steven Newman's curator insight, April 24, 11:33 AM
Love this scoop from Seth Dixon. A nice way to help kids understand sense of place .
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New York City's Disappearing Mom-and-Pop Storefronts

New York City's Disappearing Mom-and-Pop Storefronts | Teachers Toolbox | Scoop.it
Two photographers set out to see what happened to small family businesses in New York City in a decade

Via Seth Dixon
Ms. Harrington's insight:

What a decade can do to a cultural landscape.

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Heidi Ames's curator insight, April 10, 7:49 AM

Awesome to use when studying the Northeast and Immigration.  How scenes change in a short time due to economy!

L.Long's curator insight, April 15, 3:55 PM

Changing nature of world cities

Jake Reardon's curator insight, April 21, 2:49 PM

To be honest I am surprised that "Mom and Pop" storefronts lasted this long in New York City. It just seems to me that as a city grows and rent prices go up the smaller store fronts would naturally be pushed out by larger conglomerates who would be more suited to handle the rent prices. Of course it is an old addeage of capitalism that as long as you offer a good product that consumers would be inclined to consume you can stay above water in even the most competitive locations. Although to me that would appear to have its limits. Perhaps the economic tides of the present in New York are that limit.

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Walmart Slumber Party

Walmart Slumber Party | Teachers Toolbox | Scoop.it
Who wants to spend the night in a Walmart parking lot?

 

There are a few generally accepted principles when it comes to the etiquette of spending the night in a vehicle in a Walmart parking lot. One night only. No chairs or barbecue grills outside an R.V. Shop at the store for gas, food or supplies, if you can, as a way of saying thanks. Walmart, the country’s largest discount retailer, says you’re welcome: its Web site says that R.V. travelers are “among our best customers.” The photographer Nolan Conway has been taking pictures of Walmart’s resident guests at several stores in central Arizona. Sophia Stauffer, a 20-year-old who travels the country in a van with her boyfriend and their dog, describes their lots, which usually feel quiet and safe, as their best option for most nights. “We really don’t want to work or live in a house,” she says.


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Darien Southall's comment, March 2, 10:23 PM
When I was younger my family went on a road trip before heading to a family reunion. The half a week we were on the road we stopped in Walmart parking lots during the nights. Honestly, I think that staying in a Walmart parking lot is something everyone should experience while on the road (whether it be good or bad).
Lauren Jacquez's curator insight, March 3, 9:26 AM

We see this all the time at our Walmarts in Fresno!

 

Willow Weir's comment, March 10, 9:07 AM
I can see the appeal of safety and the inexpensive nature compared to a camp. I don't think the ability to camp in their parking lots makes up for walmarts many ills considering how many families they keep in poverty
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Inequality and the Gini Coefficient

Inequality and the Gini Coefficient | Teachers Toolbox | Scoop.it
Think everyone should just pull themselves up by their bootstraps? Try this one on for size.

Via Seth Dixon
Ms. Harrington's insight:

Educating in poverty

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Anne Gray's curator insight, October 12, 2013 9:37 AM

See the dark blue in Arizona? That is where the Native Americans are.

Heidi Hutchison's curator insight, October 12, 2013 10:46 AM

Just incredibly awesome, but so, so sadly true.

Alison D. Gilbert's curator insight, October 16, 2013 4:47 AM

Do you find this information surprising?

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Ghosts of War

Ghosts of War | Teachers Toolbox | Scoop.it
The remarkable pictures show scenes from France today with atmospheric photographs taken in the same place during the war superimposed on top.

 

In this fastinating set of images, Dutch artist and historian Jo Teeuwisse merges her passions literally by superimposing World War II photographs on to modern pictures of the where the photos were originally taken.  This serves as a reminder that places are rich with history; to understand the geography of a place, one must also know it's history (and vice versa).   

 

Tags: Europe, war, images, historial, place. 


Via Seth Dixon
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Lauren Stahowiak's curator insight, February 25, 9:56 AM

Historian Jo Teeuwisse creates dramatic imagery by overlaying negative images onto current images. These World War II photos show how different things were at the time and how people walk these streets everyday and may not even think twice about the streets history. Art is the best way to show emotion, and Jo Teeuwisse's art imposes a creative take on this.

Cam E's curator insight, February 27, 8:26 AM

I'm not even sure what to say about this set of pictures exactly, except that they're a very cool way to see history. I'm interesting in Social Studies and history because I'm captivated by seeing the world framed in a story, and these images do just that. To see the same places where the war was fought and what has changed is great, but these photos also give the impression of some stories of war. The idea of them being "ghosts" gives the impression of something left behind which marks the land even to this day.

Samuel D'Amore's curator insight, September 10, 11:56 AM

Very interesting, I've seen similar things done with Russian cities and parts of the Ukaranian country side.