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Europe’s Landscape Is Still Scarred by World War I

Europe’s Landscape Is Still Scarred by World War I | Teachers Toolbox | Scoop.it
Photographs of the abandoned battlefields reveal the trenches’ scars still run deep

Via Seth Dixon
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Clarissa Rangel's curator insight, May 28, 8:48 PM

"Lest we ever forget"... 

Catherine Smyth's curator insight, June 2, 7:47 PM

A geographical perspective of World War 1.

Nicole Kearsch's curator insight, October 14, 2:15 PM

When you think of destruction of a war you think short term effects, some buildings are blown up but its not anything that can't be rebuilt.  Never is it thought of what war does to the surrounding land.  The trenches that are built, the craters left from exploding bombs.  All these change the landscape potentially forever.  The people that live here must maneuver around these scars especially if they are located on someones farmland or other personal property.

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What is halal meat?

What is halal meat? | Teachers Toolbox | Scoop.it

"There have been calls for clearer labelling of halal products in shops, restaurants and takeaways. But what is halal food? And why are campaigners so concerned?"


Via Seth Dixon
Ms. Harrington's insight:

Halal means permissible, the opposite of Haram  which means forbidden or illegal. 


Halal meat means that has been prepared in accordance with Islamic traditions and is therefore permissible for an observant Muslim to eat (very similar to Kosher for Jewish people). 


Within the European Union more Muslims are migrating to Europe.  Some Europeans, however, feel that the Halal labeling and marketing is a change to the cultural landscape that they are not comfortable with, and don't want to see it become more mainstream.  Other meat companies try to present their products as Halal, but don't adhere to all of the customs according to some more strict Muslims.  Halal, then is a lightning rod, in either direction right now in Europe. - From Seth Dixon

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Seth Dixon's curator insight, May 8, 3:47 PM

I know just enough Arabic to read the word Halal (حلال) and know that it means permissible, the opposite of Haram (حَرَام‎) which means forbidden or illegal.  In the context of meat, it means meat that has been prepared in accordance with Islamic traditions and is therefore permissible for an observant Muslim to eat (very similar to Kosher for Jewish people).  Today, Halal is becoming an important issue within the European Union for two main reasons: 1) more Muslims are migrating to Europe and 2) Europeans are searching for less artificial food products.  Some Europeans, however, feel that the Halal labeling and marketing is a change to the cultural landscape that they are not comfortable with, and don't want to see it become more mainstream.  Other meat companies try to present their products as Halal, but don't adhere to all of the customs according to some more strict Muslims.  Halal, then is a lightning rod, in either direction right now in Europe.  If you want to see the inner workings of a Halal slaughterhouse in New York, this video will show you what it is like.   

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Seeing Landmarks From Far Away Might Shatter Your Perception Of Them

Seeing Landmarks From Far Away Might Shatter Your Perception Of Them | Teachers Toolbox | Scoop.it
Wow. I guess it's true when they say not everything is as it appears...

Via Seth Dixon
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Kristen McDaniel's curator insight, March 21, 11:34 AM

I think it's awesome to see the past mixed with the present, and realizing how our imagination adds to the "mystery" of places.  However, seeing things in context truly changes perception - how could this be brought to your students?  Fascinating.  

Maricarmen Husson's curator insight, March 28, 11:43 AM

LA PERCEPCIÓN A TRAVÉS DE LA DISTANCIA

Jessica Rieman's curator insight, April 2, 5:33 PM

By looking at these images it is apparent that heir is a clear distincition between how one may view the monument from upclose andd then when you take asep back you can really appreciate it by seeing others appreciate it as well. As an observer you can also identify the different persepectives by looking at it in a different light by either taking a step back or viewing it from a different vanage point. Knowing the history of the monument also helps with a background story in order for better appreciation of the monument and the History that goes along with it.

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Unnatural Landscapes

Unnatural Landscapes | Teachers Toolbox | Scoop.it

In a world where photoshop has made the unreal seem ordinary, these unearthly seemingly landscapes might seem likely fakes.  The world can be that extraordinary.  Pictured above is the "Door to Hell" in Turkmenistan.  Rich with natural gas, Soviets were drilling in 1971 when the drilling rig collapsed and left a huge (230 feet wide) hole.  In an attempt to stop gas leaks they hoped a fire would burn off any discharge, but it is still burning today.  Enjoy this gallery of 25 'unnatural' images.   


Via Seth Dixon
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oliviersc's comment, November 13, 2012 5:50 PM
Shared in this Revue : Cheesecake et bonnets pour tenir chaud = http://blogoliviersc.org/?p=5974
Ryan G Soares's curator insight, December 3, 2013 10:53 AM

Some of the best looking images I have ever seen! The picture I found most facinating was the "Door To Hell". The Door to Hell is filled with natural gas. "In an attempt to stop gas leaks they hoped a fire would burn off any discharge, but it is still burning today." The fire started in 1971 and it is still burning today!? CRAZY

 

Jess Deady's curator insight, May 4, 10:05 AM

Sometimes you really can't tell whether a picture is real or not. How do landscapes like this form on their own? In this particular picture, the cause of a drilling rig has left a giant hole. The fire is still burning and has left the world to see a beautiful, unnatural landscape.

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Alluvial Fans

Alluvial Fans | Teachers Toolbox | Scoop.it
When streams emerge from mountains, they often spread out and deposit sediment in a distinctive pattern known as an alluvial fan.

Via Seth Dixon
Ms. Harrington's insight:

In dry areas of interior drainage the human settlements are often clustered along the foothills of the mountains near landforms called alluvial fans. 


Alluvial fans and the agricultural patterns that people create on them, show how human settlements are highly dependent of the physical environment.  

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Lorraine Chaffer's curator insight, May 23, 11:29 PM

Inland water year 10 , River landscapes year 8 

Shanelle Zaino's curator insight, October 22, 2:10 PM

Interesting to see the correlation between waterways and population.It is very important to pick a place to live that you will be able to not only thrive but survive. Being cognizant of where flood planes are located as well as growing areas is  also very important.

Jennifer Brown's curator insight, November 10, 12:01 PM

I love the way people have learned to adapt and survive around mother nature. Also that mother nature has adapted to itself! Instead of just dumping run-off into a single stream, it's managed to spread it out and distribute its sediment around allowing the land to strive

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New York City's Disappearing Mom-and-Pop Storefronts

New York City's Disappearing Mom-and-Pop Storefronts | Teachers Toolbox | Scoop.it
Two photographers set out to see what happened to small family businesses in New York City in a decade

Via Seth Dixon
Ms. Harrington's insight:

What a decade can do to a cultural landscape.

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Heidi Ames's curator insight, April 10, 10:49 AM

Awesome to use when studying the Northeast and Immigration.  How scenes change in a short time due to economy!

L.Long's curator insight, April 15, 6:55 PM

Changing nature of world cities

Jake Reardon's curator insight, April 21, 5:49 PM

To be honest I am surprised that "Mom and Pop" storefronts lasted this long in New York City. It just seems to me that as a city grows and rent prices go up the smaller store fronts would naturally be pushed out by larger conglomerates who would be more suited to handle the rent prices. Of course it is an old addeage of capitalism that as long as you offer a good product that consumers would be inclined to consume you can stay above water in even the most competitive locations. Although to me that would appear to have its limits. Perhaps the economic tides of the present in New York are that limit.

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Places in their Proper Perspectives

Places in their Proper Perspectives | Teachers Toolbox | Scoop.it

"A fisherman's cottage is described by real estate agents as a 'property not to be missed' but it is also just yards away from two nuclear power stations."


Via Seth Dixon
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Adilson Camacho's curator insight, January 31, 6:19 PM

Versões...

Fern Torres's curator insight, February 3, 4:11 PM

Perception is everything!

Jess Deady's curator insight, April 16, 1:35 PM

This house is 100% misleading. The paper advertised the first picture, which from the looks of it isn't so bad. Then when you get the reverse picture and see the nuclear power plants behind it, its a whole new scene! Whoever is trying to sell this house- good luck to you. Who wants to live next to something that could literally kill god knows what? Not me. 

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Ghosts of War

Ghosts of War | Teachers Toolbox | Scoop.it
The remarkable pictures show scenes from France today with atmospheric photographs taken in the same place during the war superimposed on top.

 

In this fastinating set of images, Dutch artist and historian Jo Teeuwisse merges her passions literally by superimposing World War II photographs on to modern pictures of the where the photos were originally taken.  This serves as a reminder that places are rich with history; to understand the geography of a place, one must also know it's history (and vice versa).   

 

Tags: Europe, war, images, historial, place. 


Via Seth Dixon
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Lauren Stahowiak's curator insight, February 25, 12:56 PM

Historian Jo Teeuwisse creates dramatic imagery by overlaying negative images onto current images. These World War II photos show how different things were at the time and how people walk these streets everyday and may not even think twice about the streets history. Art is the best way to show emotion, and Jo Teeuwisse's art imposes a creative take on this.

Cam E's curator insight, February 27, 11:26 AM

I'm not even sure what to say about this set of pictures exactly, except that they're a very cool way to see history. I'm interesting in Social Studies and history because I'm captivated by seeing the world framed in a story, and these images do just that. To see the same places where the war was fought and what has changed is great, but these photos also give the impression of some stories of war. The idea of them being "ghosts" gives the impression of something left behind which marks the land even to this day.

Samuel D'Amore's curator insight, September 10, 2:56 PM

Very interesting, I've seen similar things done with Russian cities and parts of the Ukaranian country side.