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Where Will The World's Water Conflicts Erupt?

Where Will The World's Water Conflicts Erupt? | Teachers Toolbox | Scoop.it

As the climate shifts, rivers will both flood and dry up more often, according to the latest report from the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change. Shortages are especially likely in parts of the world already strapped for water, so political scientists expect feuds will become even more intense. To track disputes worldwide, researchers at Oregon State University spent a decade building a comprehensive database of international exchanges—-both conflicts and alliances—over shared water resources. They found that countries often begin disputes belligerently but ultimately reach peaceful agreements. Says Aaron Wolf, the geographer who leads the project, “For me the really interesting part is how even Arabs and Israelis, Indians and Pakistanis, are able to resolve their differences and find a solution.”


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Adilson Camacho's curator insight, June 20, 2014 2:50 PM

Questões políticas... 

J. Mark Schwanz's curator insight, June 21, 2014 11:01 AM

Add water to geography education curriculum? You better believe it. The crisis of the 21st century is and will be water.  

Courtney Barrowman's curator insight, May 21, 11:36 AM

summer reading KQ2: How have humans altered the Earth's environment?  Water Security

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Japan banned from Antarctic whaling

Japan banned from Antarctic whaling | Teachers Toolbox | Scoop.it
The UN's International Court of Justice rules that Japan must temporarily halt its whaling programme in the Antarctic.

 

It agreed with Australia, which brought the case in May 2010, that the  programme was not for scientific research as claimed by Tokyo. Japan said it would abide by the decision but added it "regrets and is deeply  disappointed by the decision". Australia argued that the programme was commercial whaling in disguise. The court's decision is considered legally binding. Japan had argued that the suit brought by Australia was an attempt to impose its cultural norms on Japan.


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The World's Largest Trees

"The world's second-largest known tree, the President, in Sequoia National Park is photographed by National Geographic magazine photographer Michael 'Nick' Nichols for the December 2012 issue."


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Hemant Galviya's curator insight, April 17, 2014 2:55 AM

hiiiiiiiiiiii

Miroslav Sopko's curator insight, April 18, 2014 11:44 AM

Najväčšie stromy sveta.

Basant Kerketta's curator insight, April 21, 2014 4:26 AM

Magnificent !!!

These kind must be saved.

Wish I could plant and replicate this size and height here in my home town.

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Unnatural Landscapes

Unnatural Landscapes | Teachers Toolbox | Scoop.it

In a world where photoshop has made the unreal seem ordinary, these unearthly seemingly landscapes might seem likely fakes.  The world can be that extraordinary.  Pictured above is the "Door to Hell" in Turkmenistan.  Rich with natural gas, Soviets were drilling in 1971 when the drilling rig collapsed and left a huge (230 feet wide) hole.  In an attempt to stop gas leaks they hoped a fire would burn off any discharge, but it is still burning today.  Enjoy this gallery of 25 'unnatural' images.   


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Jared Medeiros's curator insight, March 9, 6:52 PM

Some of these pictures are amazing. Im lucky enough to have been able to experience a few of these in my life.  The fire in Turkmenistan is unreal. I cant believe that fire has been burning since 1971. It really does seem like the "Door to Hell".

Louis Mazza's curator insight, March 12, 4:58 PM

Unnatural landscapes. Amongst all the new technology and graphics, the world still holds phenomena’s that can leave any persons jaw dropped. This article on buzzfeed shows 25 images that can amaze you. In Mt. Roraima, Venezuela there is a slab of land that seems to be suspended in the clouds. The Metro in Stockholm, Sweden resembles a space station in the rocks. The tunnel of love in the Ukraine looks like a path carved out of bush and also a romantic place for a date. The tulip Fields in Lisse, Netherlands looks like a grounded rainbow. Lapland, Finland is home to massive natural snow creatures. The mountains of Zhangye, China resembles the colors and look of Zebra stripe gum. Lake Rebta in Senegal looks like your floating in tomato soup.

Kevin Cournoyer's curator insight, May 6, 11:43 AM

Physical geography and landforms are something that have amazed people for millennia. The world's tallest mountains, deepest oceans, widest rivers, and largest deserts have, at various times, astounded, baffled, and hindered human beings. Some physical features are helpful to human progress (cities built on hills are more defensible, rivers allow for irrigation for agriculture) and others delay it (mountains are difficult to traverse, oceans are large and treacherous to navigate). And then there are landforms or geographic features that are just downright strange or unusual, like the ones listed in this article. 

 

While looking at pictures of these places or visiting them may be fun, they also provide us with a valuable lesson about nature. Nature is a force to be reckoned with, as it can produce some pretty amazing and unusual things. People sometimes do not stop to think what nature can do and as a result, suffer the consequences (Napoleon, and later Hitler's ill-fated invasions of Russia, for instance). Geography and natural landforms can be invaluable tools in human progress, but it should also be kept in mind that they are part of nature, and that nature is an unpredictable and sometimes violent force. As with anything, then, nature and geography must be respected and feared to avoid making the same mistakes that others have made in the past.