Teachers Toolbox
Follow
Find tag "borders"
239 views | +0 today
Teachers Toolbox
History and American Government Resources
Curated by Ms. Harrington
Your new post is loading...
Your new post is loading...
Rescooped by Ms. Harrington from Geography Education
Scoop.it!

What is a part of the United States?


Via Seth Dixon
Ms. Harrington's insight:

The political geography of the United States and its associated territories

more...
pascal simoens's curator insight, August 6, 5:58 PM

qui m'a dit un jour que l'"Europe, c'est compliqué?"...

MsPerry's curator insight, August 12, 6:54 PM

APHG-U4

CHS AP Human Geography's curator insight, August 17, 5:28 PM

Use in Political Geo unit, or for Canada and US region

Rescooped by Ms. Harrington from Geography Education
Scoop.it!

Google Maps Displays Crimean Border Differently In Russia, U.S.

Google Maps Displays Crimean Border Differently In Russia, U.S. | Teachers Toolbox | Scoop.it

"America and its allies have refused to accept the region's separatist move to join Russia.  A look at the maps available on two Google Maps Web addresses — one ending in .com and another in .ru — shows the disparity. In Russia, Web visitors see a solid line dividing Crimea from neighboring Ukraine. In the U.S., a dotted line separates the two, implying a disputed status within the country."


Via Seth Dixon
more...
Seth Dixon's curator insight, April 29, 2:53 PM

In this podcast we learn that this isn't the only international border dispute that is displayed differently in Google Maps.  Google uses over 30 distinct versions of international borders because there is an underlying geopolitical dimension to cartography.  This brings up more questions than it answers--How is the Kashmir displayed in India?  Pakistan?  The West Bank in Israel or Egypt?  If you haven't explored Google Maps in other languages, consider this your invitation to read maps as you would a text and to think about the political implications of making a map.   


Tags: google, mapping, borders, political.

Courtney Barrowman's curator insight, May 1, 12:33 PM

unit 1 map bias!!!

Rescooped by Ms. Harrington from Geography Education
Scoop.it!

It's Complicated: 5 Puzzling International Borders

It's Complicated: 5 Puzzling International Borders | Teachers Toolbox | Scoop.it

"Most of us think of international borders as invisible, but clear-cut lines: stand on one side, and you’re in one country; stand on the other, you’re in another country.  But here’s a list of five international borders that, for one reason or another, are not quite that simple."


Via Seth Dixon
more...
Seth Dixon's curator insight, July 12, 2013 9:20 AM

This article is in dire needs of some maps, but it still provides 5 intriguing case studies of borders and chunks of territory that defy normal categorization.


Tags: borders, political, territoriality, sovereignty.

Caterin Victor's curator insight, July 13, 2013 12:53 PM

It  is  Puzzling, but  every  human  being  chose to live in a normal,  happy  and  free  country, in a  Democratie,  if  possible.

Matthew DiLuglio's curator insight, October 12, 2013 7:20 PM

These borders and boundaries indicate something that I thought of while rewatching Independence Day (the Smith/Goldblum flick from '96)...  If we make a mess, and destroy this planet, aliens wouldn't want it.  The land that no one wants, is probably wanted by someone in reality... I am a fervent believer in aliens, and spend my free time diving into attempts to solve my quandary about the higher questions of the universe.  I think that the area that no one wants, everyone wants.  Unlike state boundaries in the US, planets are divided as separate entities from other planets, but grouped in solar systems, galaxies, asteroid belts, etc... I can't wait for the day some pompous fool gets on the bridge of a starship from Earth and sits in the captain's chair and says "Lieutenant, take us to Sector ----- (so and so)"... We will have moved up from the United States and Canada to the United Sectors of Galaxies!  And that little bit of land that 'no one wants,' everyone actually wants... same with planets.  Terraforming will allow those unsightly balls of fury that float around a star to become the most inhabitable of them all!  I wonder where these things will stop... or if it keeps going to larger sectors, endlessly? Well, we will likely encounter other species with territorial claims... play nice, America!  Or the Aliens will pop out of your stomach.  Though there are some politicians now that seem to have popped out of someone's stomach, I think the threat is more domestic while territory disputes occur nowadays, as it is humans arguing with humans, but it will increase when the Martians come to claim what is theirs.

Rescooped by Ms. Harrington from Geography Education
Scoop.it!

Israel and Palestine

Watch this Jewish Voice for Peace 6 minute mini-primer about why Israelis and Palestinians are fighting..



Via Seth Dixon
more...
Seth Dixon's comment, November 29, 2012 9:51 PM
I must admit, I did struggle on whether to post it or not. In the video the use of term 'indigenous people' to refer to the Palestinians bothered me as did a few other references, but I did feel it tried to be accurate even if their political perspective was obvious.
I would most certainly be open to posting something more pro-Israeli since I'm not trying to advocate a particular point or push a perspective, but I did think it was a good, is somewhat flawed resource. It's near impossible to find anything without bias so I decided that sharing some flawed sources is better than not sharing any on a pretty weighty topic.
Dawn Haas Tache's curator insight, January 8, 2013 1:16 PM

This video from the Jewish Voice for Peace has a more politically motivated angle than most of the resources that I post on this site, but I feel that they do justice to both sides as well as the truth.  In a simple way it lays out the roots of many of the problems in the region with historic and geographic perspectives.   

 

Tags: Israel, Palestine, conflict, political, borders.

Maegan Connor's curator insight, December 17, 2013 7:34 PM

This video is a really helpful, simplified explanation of the fighting in Israel that is fiercely complicated and has gone on for decades now with one repressed group repressing another. If I ever need to explain the struggle to students, this video would be an excellent introduction.

Rescooped by Ms. Harrington from Geography Education
Scoop.it!

Gerrymandering 101

This video is a good primer to show before the ReDistricting Game (http://www.scoop.it/t/geography-education/p/2214122954/the-redistricting-game ).


Via Seth Dixon
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Ms. Harrington from Geography Education
Scoop.it!

5 Stupidest Things Ever Done With Borders

5 Stupidest Things Ever Done With Borders | Teachers Toolbox | Scoop.it
Where you find a border, you usually find somebody pissed off about it.

 

Disclaimer: This article is more glib and crude in its language than I typically post.  However there is some great insight in this article about the curiosities that can occur on the borders that merits inclusion here.  Enclaves, walls, roads, glaciers, and tables all play prominent roles in these 5 quirky borders. 


Via Seth Dixon
more...
Ms. Harrington's comment, July 24, 2012 6:48 PM
Wow, I never knew border issues like this existed! Some are strange, but they live with the issue, like Canusa and the Netherlands/Belgium. Some are high tension, like Pakistan and India. I guess some of these issues are inevitable, the border has to go somewhere, and people over hundreds of years have moved outward.
Don Brown Jr's comment, July 25, 2012 7:09 PM
Although some of these boarders were established for security reasons, many more like the one along the American boarder seem to be constructed for more symbolic purposes as a physiological rather than a physical barrier.
Gregory S Sankey Jr.'s curator insight, December 4, 2013 3:24 PM

Within this article the author said it well, referencing that although these borders just seem silly and "stupid" to us, those who live within these boundaries must have an incredibly frustrating life. Having to hop three-four borders to get to the mainland of your country sounds completely crazy. I'm glad I live in Rhode Island.

Rescooped by Ms. Harrington from Geography Education
Scoop.it!

22 International Borders

22 International Borders | Teachers Toolbox | Scoop.it

"Brazil (top) and Bolivia (bottom)."


Via Seth Dixon
Ms. Harrington's insight:

Borders can tell us a great feel about the relationship beween the two  nations.

more...
Jason Wilhelm's curator insight, May 22, 12:52 PM

The concept of a political boundary has been developed over many many years into an unbreakable line between two different sets of people with different ideologies, religions, and government styles. The boundary extends into the ground, into the air, and includes any resources within the boundary. These pictures show the different shapes and various lines between countries, and displays the intricacies of boundaries in the world.  

Kampe Kyle's curator insight, May 28, 10:21 PM

In AP Human Geo., this relates to the concept of land use patterns. As certain countries practice deforestation, slash-and-burn and other land use types, bordering countries may take a completely indifferent approach to the land and thus create a contrast.

Lauren Sellers's curator insight, May 29, 1:11 AM

Photographs show how different countries can be even by just the border. Number 3 really stuck out to me that Haiti doesnt have as many regulation reguarding deforestation as the Dominican Republic and its very noticable.

Rescooped by Ms. Harrington from Geography Education
Scoop.it!

A Map of Baseball Nation

A Map of Baseball Nation | Teachers Toolbox | Scoop.it

"Fans may not list which team they favor on the census, but millions of them do make their preferences public on Facebook. Using aggregated data provided by the company, we were able to create an unprecedented look at the geography of baseball fandom, going down not only to the county level, as Facebook did in a nationwide map it released a few weeks ago, but also to ZIP codes."


Via Seth Dixon
more...
Brian Altonen's curator insight, April 25, 7:51 PM

Anything can be mapped.  

 

This mapping did not fully account for hybridization--for example when a friend in Texas is a Boston Red Sox fan.

Courtney Barrowman's curator insight, April 28, 10:43 AM

unit 1 & 3

Greg Russak's curator insight, April 29, 12:53 PM

Maps and baseball - a good combination!

Rescooped by Ms. Harrington from Geography Education
Scoop.it!

Bizarre Borders


Via Seth Dixon
more...
Joseph Thacker 's curator insight, January 30, 7:29 PM

Glad to see two countries like Canada and America can get along over these bizarre borders. I think many countries in the Middle East would fight over those small pieces of land. I think we avoid violence over these borders because we have such a good relationship with Canada.

Nathan Chasse's curator insight, February 1, 7:28 PM

The video highlights a bunch irregularities along the US/Canadian border. Among them, the zigzag 49th not-so-parallel, a small island which is actually a disputed territory, and another US island which is far closer to Canada than it is Washington state causing high school students to have to cross international borders four times to attend school.



This is an interesting video in that it shows how even in the recent past how difficult it was to clearly and conclusively delineate the border between the US and Canada. The fact that there is still a disputed island between two very friendly nations. This only makes it more clear why much older, less friendly nations would have heated disputes over territory.

 

Mrs. B's curator insight, February 15, 9:46 AM

Did you know the geometric boundary between US and Canada (the longest border in the world) is also a physical border? Check it out.

Rescooped by Ms. Harrington from Geography Education
Scoop.it!

On Israel's system of segregated roads in the occupied Palestinian territories

On Israel's system of segregated roads in the occupied Palestinian territories | Teachers Toolbox | Scoop.it

Tags: MiddleEast, territoriality, transportation, borders, conflict, governance, political, unit 4 political. 


Via Seth Dixon
more...
Cam E's curator insight, March 4, 11:32 AM

A relatively grim reminder that even things as clear-cut as road systems can be inherently political. This system forces segregation by the law of which roads can be driven on, but it's a good jumping point to remember that even the placement of roads can exclude or include communities. I'm reminded of the proposed idea for a NAFTA superhighway running through Mexico, Canada, and the US. One of the criticisms was that the highway would not provide exits for anywhere but major economics centers, effectively cutting off small towns from the rest of the area.

Rescooped by Ms. Harrington from Geography Education
Scoop.it!

The ReDistricting Game

The ReDistricting Game | Teachers Toolbox | Scoop.it

This is an interactive way to teach the importance of the redistricting process.  Mapmakers (and geography) are crucial to the process.  This game shows students how the process can be manipulated and if you understand local demographics and voting patterns, subtle shifts in the district borders can swing elections.  This is a great way to teaching gerrymandering and how political cartography can be.     


Via Seth Dixon
more...
Régine Ballonad-Berthois's curator insight, February 23, 9:02 AM

J'ai regardé la vidéo de présentation et j'ai eu envie de jouer à ce jeu ! J'ai aimé le graphisme, la musique et la voix du narrateur. J'ai eu envie de continuer et je pense que mes élèves auraient eu également envie d'aller plus loin. Il ne me reste donc plus qu'à le tester !