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American Way of Birth, Costliest in the World

American Way of Birth, Costliest in the World | Teachers Toolbox | Scoop.it
Maternity care and childbirth cost far more in the United States than in other developed countries, but studies show that their citizens do not have less access to care during pregnancy than Americans.

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Seth Dixon's curator insight, July 1, 2013 11:47 AM

More expensive care is not the same thing as more effective care and it most certainly does not mean the best system. 

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EU enlargement: The next seven

EU enlargement: The next seven | Teachers Toolbox | Scoop.it
Guide to the countries waiting in the wings to join the European Union club.

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Seth Dixon's curator insight, August 12, 2013 10:21 PM

With Croatia joining the EU this summer, many are starting to ask, "who's next?"  This is the guide of countries that have applied for EU membership and that might be joining in the future. 

Treathyl Fox's comment, August 13, 2013 9:45 AM
Excellent! (I hope.) Bottom line is Unity is better than Division. Oh sorry! That's the idealist in me speaking. I better switch over to the cynic. :)
Vincent Springer's comment, September 3, 2013 4:03 PM
A hearty yay for the people of Iceland and the role referendum's play in their democracy. Democracy triumphed over the poor decision making of the Icelandic banks and the (then) government that loosened regulations so they could run amok. Although still reeling from the 2008 meltdown, Iceland is well on its way to recovery and continued prosperity because of the longstanding democratic institutions of its people.
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Piracy in the Sub-Saharan Realm is "Good" Money.

Piracy in the Sub-Saharan Realm is "Good" Money. | Teachers Toolbox | Scoop.it

In this article, the topic of discussion is piracy off the Horn of Africa. It explains how pirates and the investors have made a fortune over the years aproximately 400 million dollars in the last 8 years alone.

     The article also includes a breakdown of who benefits from these attacks and what their main money makers are. Even though piracy has tapered off in the past 3 years it still has cost the global trade market billions of dollars in trade expenses. Piracy has also negatively impacted the Sub-Saharan geographic region because it has begun to spread further into different areas affecting tourism which is a positive moeny maker for the this region and reduced maritime activity in frequently pirated waters.

 

What are the long-term effects of uncontrolled piracy?

 

How will the coastal economy of the Cape withstand frequent monetary losses and reduced tourist activity?

 

How does this impact trade internationally, but mainly in the Sub-Saharan realm and it's neighbors?


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megan b clement's comment, December 16, 2013 1:37 AM
The Somali pirates brought in over 400 million dollars over the past eight years.Most of the money is made from echanging captives for ransom. Most funds were spent on drugs, prostitution, or real estate. It is a very corupt operation as a whole.
Tracy Galvin's curator insight, April 29, 2014 6:34 PM

It is very sad that people that risk their lives and gain wealth by hurting other people never really do anything good with the money. They buy drugs and prostitutes which cause them to need more money so they go out and pirate some more and the cycle goes on. The country is going to lose all good people that would have wanted to go there because it is no longer a good place to be.

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Devolution and Balkanization

Devolution and Balkanization | Teachers Toolbox | Scoop.it
The 7 modern day countries that used to be Yugoslavia pic.twitter.com/jpvGlrH0Oh

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Shanghai's Global Ascendance

Shanghai's Global Ascendance | Teachers Toolbox | Scoop.it

Reuters photographer Carlos Barria recently spent time in Shanghai, China, the fastest-growing city in the world. A week ago, he took this amazing shot, recreating the same framing and perspective as a photograph taken in 1987, showing what a difference 26 years can make. The setting is Shanghai's financial district of Pudong, dominated by the Oriental Pearl Tower at left, and the new 125-story Shanghai Tower, China's tallest building and the world's second tallest skyscraper, at 632 meters (2,073 ft) high, scheduled to finish by the end of 2014. Shanghai, the largest city by population in the world, has been growing at a rate of about 10 percent a year the past 20 years, and now is home to 23.5 million people -- nearly double what it was back in 1987. This entry is focused on this single photo pairing, with several ways to compare the two.


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Joseph Thacker 's curator insight, April 15, 2014 12:38 PM

It is amazing how quick a city can change in only 26 years. Since this picture was taken in 1987, the city's population has doubled, and is continuing to grow rapidly. Today, this city is one of the largest in the world and has magnificent skyscrapers, one of which is the second tallest in the world. It is obvious globalization hit this mega city very quickly, making it one of the most impressive cities in the world. 

Jess Deady's curator insight, May 4, 2014 9:37 PM

Buildings, skyscrapers and urbanization. Why not? This is how the world is and this is what attacks tourists. For Shanghai, they need to be up to par with all the other business and tech savvy countries and cities. This is how they are going to keep their technological business, by building what needs to be built. 

Courtney Barrowman's curator insight, September 11, 2014 2:16 PM

unit 7

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The End of the ‘Developing World’

The End of the ‘Developing World’ | Teachers Toolbox | Scoop.it
The old labels no longer apply. Rich countries need to learn from poor ones.

 

BILL GATES, in his foundation’s annual letter, declared that “the terms ‘developing countries’ and ‘developed countries’ have outlived their usefulness.” He’s right. If we want to understand the modern global economy, we need a better vocabulary.

Mr. Gates was making a point about improvements in income and gross domestic product; unfortunately, these formal measures generate categories that tend to obscure obvious distinctions. Only when employing a crude “development” binary could anyone lump Mozambique and Mexico together.

It’s tough to pick a satisfying replacement. Talk of first, second and third worlds is passé, and it’s hard to bear the Dickensian awkwardness of “industrialized nations.” Forget, too, the more recent jargon about the “global south” and “global north.” It makes little sense to counterpose poor countries with “the West” when many of the biggest economic success stories in the past few decades have come from the East.

All of these antiquated terms imply that any given country is “developing” toward something, and that there is only one way to get there.

It’s time that we start describing the world as “fat” or “lean.”


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Joanne Wegener's curator insight, March 7, 2014 5:03 AM

Fat or Lean - what sort of world do we live in

An interesting discussion on the way we perceive and label the world.

Ma. Caridad Benitez's curator insight, March 11, 2014 10:15 AM

Hoy en día poca claridad de dónde exactamente queda y quiénes son? 

Seth Dixon's curator insight, March 13, 2014 10:46 AM

UPDATE: this article (from the Atlantic) on the exact same concept would supplement the NY Times article nicely.  

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The Case for Cul-de-Sacs

The Case for Cul-de-Sacs | Teachers Toolbox | Scoop.it
People who live in them actually have greater social cohesion, according to one sociologist.

 

Thomas R. Hochschild Jr. actually first encountered the social cohesion of cul-de-sacs in his latest research when he wandered into one in Connecticut with his clipboard and polo shirt, and someone called the cops.  That never happened on the other types of streets he was studying, places where it would turn out the neighbors didn't know each other as well, and it was less clear who "belonged." Repeatedly, though, he found at the end of cul-de-sacs families who watched each others' children and took in each others' mail, who barbequed and orchestrated the removal of snow together, and who considered each other close friends. In cul-de-sacs, these families had a stronger sense of shared social space and territoriality. An outsider stood out.


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Alison D. Gilbert's curator insight, February 23, 2014 8:33 PM

Living in a cul-de-sac sounds very inviting.

Joseph Thacker 's curator insight, February 24, 2014 1:32 PM

I lived in a col-de-sac for a number of years. My family and I had very close relationships with our two neighbors within our col-de-sac. We had parties together and helped each other out in times of need - this article is spot on.  

Matt Richardson's curator insight, February 25, 2014 10:13 AM

Interesting article about suburban design.

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Rivers from Above

Rivers from Above | Teachers Toolbox | Scoop.it
Get a unique view of these rivers beyond the banks.Photo editing by Lia Pepe

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Woodstock School's curator insight, February 25, 2014 5:01 AM

The Art of Geography

Mark Burgess's curator insight, February 26, 2014 6:26 AM

Awesome rivers. i love a good river.

ok's curator insight, September 23, 2014 5:45 AM

esrdcfvtgbhyjnkmstgyb weiweeee

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Mapping Poverty in America

Mapping Poverty in America | Teachers Toolbox | Scoop.it

“ Data from the Census Bureau show where the poor live.”


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Sinkholes and Karst Topography

The above YouTube clip was embedded in this LiveScience article: "Sinkholes are an increasingly deadly risk in Florida, due primarily to the region's geology. The state is largely underlain by porous limestone, which can hold immense amounts of water in underground aquifers. As groundwater slowly flows through the limestone, it forms a landscape called karst, known for features like caves, springs and sinkholes.

The water in aquifers also exerts pressure on the limestone and helps to stabilize the overlying surface layer, usually clay, silt and sand in Florida. Sinkholes form when that layer of surface material caves in.

The collapse can be triggered by a heavy overload, often caused by a downpour or flooding, or when water gets pumped out of the ground."


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Bonnie Bracey Sutton's curator insight, January 30, 2014 11:03 PM
What a great piece. Mind your p's and q's and Karst.
Shiva Prakash's curator insight, February 3, 2014 11:20 PM

Technology is changing the shopping habits of buyers. Compete recently conducted a survey that reported a rapid increase in the number of people using their mobile devices for shopping Online shopping which u can buy from home easily with lots of designs of cloths and new technology mobile phones without going out for shopping just click here to go eaZy http://shopdeer.blogspot.in/

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Security Still A Major Concern In Sochi

ESPN Video: Jeremy Schaap details the threats to the 2014 Winter Olympic Games in Sochi, Russia.

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Jessica Rieman's curator insight, February 18, 2014 2:14 PM

Security is a major concern in Sochi! There have been suicide bombers and many other forms of bomb threats. The athletes are under MAX security and in my opinion need to be because they are in danger because of the way their society is over there and the current issues they have been dealing or not dealing with.

Lauren Stahowiak's curator insight, February 18, 2014 2:57 PM

The Olympics being held in Sochi, Russia concern many across the globe. Located very close to neighboring terrorists, Olympic athletes question whether it is safe to go or not. ESPN discusses the concerns, threats and  increase of security at the games this year. 

Jess Deady's curator insight, April 30, 2014 8:29 PM

The Olympic games only come around every four years. From a spectators point of view, these games are a worldwide phenomenon. Millions of people will be watching them from home and in attendance in Sochi. Threats against HUGE events like these need to be taken seriously. Whether or not they are realistic, with so many lives in potential danger Russia needs to take the threats seriously.

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Infant Mortality Rates

Infant Mortality Rates | Teachers Toolbox | Scoop.it
Are All Mothers Created Equal? From the State of the World's Mothers 2012 report see how mothers locations have an impact on the life and death of their children.

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Why So Many Emerging Megacities Remain So Poor

Why So Many Emerging Megacities Remain So Poor | Teachers Toolbox | Scoop.it
How globalization has changed the nature of urban development.

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Marcelle Searles's curator insight, January 25, 2014 3:34 AM

useful for Year 9, 10 and 11 Geography units

Bonnie Bracey Sutton's curator insight, January 30, 2014 10:21 PM

Around the world is the same set of problems. Check the Esri  resources that are used to compare cities.

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Children given lifelong ban on talking about fracking

Children given lifelong ban on talking about fracking | Teachers Toolbox | Scoop.it
Two Pennsylvanian children will live their lives under a gag order imposed under a $750,000 settlement

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Seth Dixon's curator insight, August 5, 2013 7:46 PM

I've lived in central Pennsylvania for a few years, and it's deals like this that make me so skeptical of the fracking industry.  Here's a good site that discusses the environmental dangers of fracking

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Let There Be Light! Norwegian Town Sees First Winter Sun

Let There Be Light! Norwegian Town Sees First Winter Sun | Teachers Toolbox | Scoop.it
Rjukan, Norway, has spent six months of every year without direct sunlight, but new mountaintop mirrors herald a brighter future.

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Seth Dixon's curator insight, November 4, 2013 4:25 PM

Life north of the Arctic Circle isn't for the faint-hearted.  In the town of Rjukan, the are simply trying to make the winter months more tolerable (this image and story was originally uncovered on the Boston Globe's Big Picture).

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Modern-Day Piracy

Modern-Day Piracy | Teachers Toolbox | Scoop.it

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Seth Dixon's curator insight, January 8, 2014 4:06 PM

Piracy is not something that only happened in the 17th century.  Somalia is right next to 3 of the top 5 zones.  What economic, cultural and political circumstances in the 21st century would allow for piracy to exist?  What are the impacts of piracy on Somalia?    

Ann-Laure Liéval's curator insight, January 9, 2014 5:04 AM

Les espaces maritimes stratégiques: les zones de forte piraterie. 

Kevin Barker's curator insight, January 18, 2014 6:16 PM

What are the site and situation characteristics of these locations?  In otherwords, why are they happening here and not elsewhere?

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Gaping hole to mark Breivik victims

Gaping hole to mark Breivik victims | Teachers Toolbox | Scoop.it

"A slice of rock removed from the mainland near the island of Utoeya is the winning design for a memorial to commemorate the victims of Norwegian mass killer Anders Behring Breivik."


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Giovanni Sonego's curator insight, March 7, 2014 3:43 AM

Il 22 luglio 2011 il fanatico cristiano Anders Breivik ha ucciso 69 ragazzi nell'isola di Utøya in Norvegia e procurato la morte di altre 8 persone in un attentato con esplosivo a Oslo. Una tragedia che ha colpito tutto il mondo e ha lasciato impietrita la civilissima Norvegia.

Per ricordare le vittime di questo massacro sarà creato un monumento. Questo il design selezionato. Un monumento che riesce a riprodurre in modo fisico il dolore procurato dall'esperienza di chi ha dovuto provare in prima persona la perdita improvvisa, brutale e permanente di tante persone care.

JoseMªRiveros's curator insight, March 7, 2014 2:36 PM

Espectacular !!!!

Un trozo de roca retirado de la parte continental cerca de la isla de Utoya. 

Joseph Thacker 's curator insight, March 12, 2014 11:32 AM

This is a creative and beautiful idea for a monument. I have never come across a design similar to this one. This is a great example of taking advantage of the surroundings around you, such as the water, rocks and trees. 

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An Atlas of Poverty

An Atlas of Poverty | Teachers Toolbox | Scoop.it
We think we know what poverty looks like. But how do we accurately account for it? How do we know where to look?
Poverty maps are one place to begin. Technological advances of the past decade—the increased capability to both collect and process improved data—make it possible to reveal the face of the poor in finer detail than ever before. By translating data into the visual accessibility of a map, we can locate poverty more precisely, understand its sources more comprehensively—and attack it more effectively. Such maps can even be used to monitor the results of anti-poverty efforts. Poverty maps can be part of a strong, new foundation for building and tailoring policies and programs, to reach those people that will benefit the most.
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Nancy Watson's curator insight, March 9, 2014 8:27 PM

This is very revealing

Sieg Holle's curator insight, March 10, 2014 9:10 PM

solutions anyone......

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Walmart Slumber Party

Walmart Slumber Party | Teachers Toolbox | Scoop.it
Who wants to spend the night in a Walmart parking lot?

 

There are a few generally accepted principles when it comes to the etiquette of spending the night in a vehicle in a Walmart parking lot. One night only. No chairs or barbecue grills outside an R.V. Shop at the store for gas, food or supplies, if you can, as a way of saying thanks. Walmart, the country’s largest discount retailer, says you’re welcome: its Web site says that R.V. travelers are “among our best customers.” The photographer Nolan Conway has been taking pictures of Walmart’s resident guests at several stores in central Arizona. Sophia Stauffer, a 20-year-old who travels the country in a van with her boyfriend and their dog, describes their lots, which usually feel quiet and safe, as their best option for most nights. “We really don’t want to work or live in a house,” she says.


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Darien Southall's comment, March 3, 2014 1:23 AM
When I was younger my family went on a road trip before heading to a family reunion. The half a week we were on the road we stopped in Walmart parking lots during the nights. Honestly, I think that staying in a Walmart parking lot is something everyone should experience while on the road (whether it be good or bad).
Lauren Jacquez's curator insight, March 3, 2014 12:26 PM

We see this all the time at our Walmarts in Fresno!

 

Willow Weir's comment, March 10, 2014 12:07 PM
I can see the appeal of safety and the inexpensive nature compared to a camp. I don't think the ability to camp in their parking lots makes up for walmarts many ills considering how many families they keep in poverty
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The Growth of Megacities

The Growth of Megacities | Teachers Toolbox | Scoop.it

"For the first time in human history, more of the world’s 6.8 billion people live in cities than in rural areas. That is an incredible demographic and geographic shift since 1950 when only 30 percent of the world’s 2.5 billion inhabitants lived in urban environments.

 

The world’s largest cities, particularly in developing countries, are growing at phenomenal rates. As a growing landless class is attracted by urban opportunities, meager as they might be, these cities’ populations are ballooning to incredible numbers.

 

A May 2010 Christian Science Monitor article on “megacities” predicted that by 2050, almost 70 percent of the world’s estimated 10 billion people—more than the number of people living today—will reside in urban areas. The social, economic and environmental problems associated with a predominantly urbanized population are considerably different from those of the mostly rural world population of the past."


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Whitney Souery's curator insight, May 28, 2014 6:48 PM

The majority of megacities are in the developing world, with the exception of places like New York and Tokyo, best showing how the face of the world is changing. Developing countries are on their paths to becoming major powers, such as Calkutta for example. As an enlarging city, more and more citizens are flocking to the abundance of jobs in the city which thus increases India's development as a result of the growing city and thus leads to a cycle of growth as demand for more jobs increases as the city grows. Megacities are thus a symbol of the developing world and can be used in human geography as symbols of development. 

L.Long's curator insight, August 28, 2015 6:08 AM

mega cities

Aidan Lowery's curator insight, March 21, 12:06 PM
unit 7
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Americans Speak English Totally Differently From Each Other…

Americans Speak English Totally Differently From Each Other… | Teachers Toolbox | Scoop.it

Great visual for the geography of language in the United States

 

Ms. Harrington's insight:

Great visual for the geography of language in the United States

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Military industrial complex: These 15 countries have the largest defense budgets

Military industrial complex: These 15 countries have the largest defense budgets | Teachers Toolbox | Scoop.it
World defense spending is expected to go up for the first time in five years, thanks to China and Russia.

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Jessica Rieman's curator insight, February 18, 2014 1:32 PM

Russia is the third highest goverment military that spends around 143 million people lived in Russia in 2012 and they spent around $475 per person on it's military. Russia compared to China and the US is another story the US is number one in who spent the most on their military forces at $600.4 billion. As far as China is concerened it comes in at number two at spending around  $112.2 billion. These numbers make sense especially for the power house that China is and how their values of militarism affect their spending and their way of society/life.

Edgar Manasseh Jr.'s curator insight, March 7, 2015 10:00 PM

Wow looking at all these defense military budgets show why some economies are not producing well, but at the same time its astonishing how much money is spent protecting homelands. It will grow in the next 5 years, and hopefully i'll be around to see what has changed who has taken the top position because i feel as if their will be a shift in the tides.

Jared Medeiros's curator insight, March 9, 2015 6:10 PM

Not surprised at many names on the list, but am surprised at The US figure, how much it costs per American, and at the gap between The US and China.  Its scary to see some of the names on the list though and wonder if they are using that money for defense, or an offensive attack.

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9 Reasons the U.S. Ended Up So Much More Car-Dependent Than Europe

9 Reasons the U.S. Ended Up So Much More Car-Dependent Than Europe | Teachers Toolbox | Scoop.it
Understanding mistakes of the past can help guide U.S. transportation policy in the future.

 

In 2010, Americans drove for 85 percent of their daily trips, compared to car trip shares of 50 to 65 percent in Europe. Longer trip distances only partially explain the difference. Roughly 30 percent of daily trips are shorter than a mile on either side of the Atlantic. But of those under one-mile trips, Americans drove almost 70 percent of the time, while Europeans made 70 percent of their short trips by bicycle, foot, or public transportation.  The statistics don't reveal the sources of this disparity, but there are nine main reasons American metro areas have ended up so much more car-dependent than cities in Western Europe.


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Kendra King's curator insight, January 28, 2015 7:51 PM

According to this article, “U.S. (transportation) planners” look to Europe for inspiration as the planners try to decrease Americans’ “car dependency.” Instead of giving answers about how to solve the “car dependency” issue, the author provided nine reasons for why Europeans walk and bike more. Ideas like how the European infrastructure was built (i.e their zoning laws, highways, and biking/pedestrian lanes) were discussed. I found the implication that European’s were able to walk more because residential areas and businesses were intermixed the most interesting of all these reasons. It could never really matter because most of America’s land is already developed, but it did make me remember an earlier study mentioned in the article in which 70% of Americans wouldn’t walk a mile when they could. Triggering this just made me think that intermixing our buildings wouldn’t matter because we are too lazy to walk. Some may come back with the idea that a lack of relaxed pedestrian and bike lanes prohibit this option. However, with the amount of sidewalks around, I just keep thinking it all goes back to how much we exercise (which isn’t much). So honestly, it is an unhealthy attitude that planners need to change. Meaning some drastic action would need to occur in order to actually change people’s habits.

 

 More drastic ideas like decreasing government subsidies on oil, taxing cars, and implementing policies that “shifted behavior” (i.e. no parking zones) were also explained. However with oil companies and car industries around, I don’t actually see lobbyist letting that happening in the short term. Ironically, the article mentioned that the reason U.S. planners were thinking about how to change transportation was because the model the county uses is “unstainable.” This means the transportation system cannot be maintained for either “environmental, social, or economic reasons” (see included link for definition). Thinking about these factors, I just kept coming back to oil. Environmentally it is a fixed resource, socially people want less of it due to climate change, and economically it is typically more costly. What this all means is that an alternative energy source is needed. When that eventually happens, America will probably believe the transportation system is sustainable again regardless of “urban sprawl” and lack of “public transportation.” I say this because the author pointed out how America thought itself stable during the 80’s and 90’s when energy prices were low thereby implying the bigger issue is the oil needed to change people’s behavior. 

 

Overall, the author did provide an in-depth list that made me pay attention to the cultural and government differences between America and Europe from the way space interacts with these regions.

 

*http://environment.transportation.org/environmental_issues/sustainability/#bookmarksubSustainableTransportation

Jared Medeiros's curator insight, February 4, 2015 6:41 PM

 A big reason why people are more car dependant in America is because we are a lazy nation.  Americans are always looking for the easy way to accomplish things, so if you can drive a mile to work in 2 minutes or walk in 15, its almost guarenteed that the American is walking! This is obviously a general term and does not apply to all Americans but a vast majority would opt for the vehicle.  As someone who has taken several trips to Europe, people there are in far better shape than in America and i'm sure that fitness along with better eating habits attribute to that.  

Another reason I believe America is more dependant than Europe on cars is because it is far easier and cheaper to travel via train or subway in Europe.  Train stations and public transport in America are expensive and only take you to highly populated areas while the trains in Europe will take you all over the continent.

 

Gene Gagne's curator insight, November 18, 2015 2:40 PM

This has major impact on health issues, because nobody wants to walk or bike anymore which most of us did until 16 years old, it is a good form of exercise and can keep a persons body weight down. Which would lead to less health issues. Also the pollution from the vehicles and illegal dumping of tires and batteries and oil which leads to environmental problems. Socially we would meet more people and even see more of our surroundings if we drove less. Economically we as individuals would save money by not driving or would we? We would save on gas, licenses, maintenance, but on the other hand our renewal of licenses, registration, and even taxes on the vehicle help support our schools, busing and other community projects. This funding would be cut and therefore taxes will rise on something else we would end up paying for. I personally just think as Americans we drive everywhere and spend less time taking bikes, walks even skateboards all over the city which we loved to do as teenagers. I don't expect to be rollerblading or skateboarding at an older age but why do we stop at 16. It is because we are allowed to under the law to drive and everyone can't wait until high school to get their license. Once we give up our bikes and rollerblades, skateboards, walks it is hard to go back to it.

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Does English still borrow words from other languages?

Does English still borrow words from other languages? | Teachers Toolbox | Scoop.it

"English language has 'borrowed' words for centuries. But is it now lending more than it's taking, asks Philip Durkin, deputy chief editor of the Oxford English Dictionary. "

 

Knowledge of what is being borrowed, and from where, provides an invaluable insight into the international relations of the English language.  Today English borrows words from other languages with a truly global reach.


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Amanda Morgan's comment, September 13, 2014 6:08 PM
Words of the English language were borrowed from other numerous languages. Foreign words will continue to be introduced to the language with the growth of globalization
Amanda Morgan's curator insight, September 18, 2014 10:51 AM

Words of the English language were borrowed from other numerous languages. Foreign words will continue to be introduced to the language with the growth of globalization

Chris Plummer's curator insight, January 12, 2015 11:44 PM

Summary- This article explains how the English language is using many words from other languages. Leg, sky, take , they are all examples of these words borrowed.  In this example these languages are from the Scandinavian language. While we may not realize it, we use words from languages every single day. English is like a melting pot of mixed languages.

 

Insight- In Unit 3 one thing we study is where languages come from. Languages come from many places and ofter are similar to some, and very different from others. Many languages such as ours, "borrow" words from other languages to be in out own. This shows that the diffusion of many languages mix or overlap a little.

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What Everybody From The North Needs To Understand About The Traffic Disaster In Atlanta

What Everybody From The North Needs To Understand About The Traffic Disaster In Atlanta | Teachers Toolbox | Scoop.it

"Republicans want to blame government (a Democrat thing) or Atlanta (definitely a Democrat thing). Democrats want to blame the region’s dependence on cars (a Republican thing), the state government (Republicans), and many of the transplants from more liberal, urban places feel the same way you might about white, rural, southern drivers. All of this is true to some extent but none of it is helpful."


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Melissa Marie Falco-Dargitz's curator insight, November 3, 2014 12:13 PM

   AH, only government could make such a mess out of snow. It seems impossible to get anyone to agree to anything. Solutions need to be found in ways to work together. I think snow is the least of the issues here. It just doesn’t happen often enough to be of great concern. But city, state and local governments need to learn to work together for the best interests of their constituents. 

 

Edgar Manasseh Jr.'s curator insight, January 30, 2015 2:46 PM

Atlanta's struggles with 2 inches of snow was a hilarious sight. I mean its funny for us Northerners but not for them. We are used to driving our big large trucks over 6 inches of snow but for them its like a global error, they see it as the end of the world. A friend of mine from Goergia who moved up here in the north says its hard for him to get through the snow now, because he is adjusting to the climate by wearing coats and etc. So i guess its like the same thing for Northerners when a Tornado occurs  around our area we freak and panic.

Adam Deneault's curator insight, December 4, 2015 9:09 PM

to me, as a native born northerner, right here in RI, it is funny to hear that a state gets freaked out by a little bit of snow, when to me, two inches of snow is not even an amount to cross my mind when it snows. I used to know a guy that attended school here at RIC, I met him in my French class my first year here. He grew up in San Diegeo his entire life and only moved here when he married his wife. He told me the very first time it snowed here he was on a highway, got nervous because he never had to drive in snow before and said he when he came across the closest bridge, he parked under it. I even have a friend now that said when he was in basic training for the USAF in Texas, it had snowed one night and his Drill Instructors cancelled drill for the day because the base was not equipped with proper snow removal machines or shovels. 

 

as for the government wise, there was a paragraph explaining how should people be trained? because if they are trained now and it does not snow again until 2020, those people probably moved on with other jobs and have new ones, so what about the new untrained people? I think, that even though it is not likely to happen, the new people should have a brief training on snow removal.