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History and American Government Resources
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Why It Matters That National Geographic Just Ceded Crimea to Vladimir Putin

Why It Matters That National Geographic Just Ceded Crimea to Vladimir Putin | Teachers Toolbox | Scoop.it
After word came down this week that the Crimean parliament had officially voted to secede from Ukraine and join Russia, Western governments immediately condemned the move. But one influential institution broke ranks to recognize the peninsula’s new political status: National Geographic. Not two days after the vote, the magazine’s editors...

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25 Most Scariest Places on Earth

25 Most Scariest Places on Earth | Teachers Toolbox | Scoop.it

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Seth Dixon's curator insight, April 18, 9:54 AM

Some of these are shrouded in mystery, haunted stories or strange geologic formations.  Many of these would be a great place to visit; others I would avoid at all costs.  Which ones would you like to go to?

Stephen Zimmett's curator insight, April 22, 4:17 PM

Death zone, Mt. Everest, Nepal: 13 people died hear recently

Death zone, Mt. Everest, Nepal

See More : http://news-hound.co/25-most-scariest-places-on-earth/Death zone, Mt. Everest, Nepal

See More : http://news-hound.co/25-most-scariest-places-on-earth/
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Globalization and the Textile Industry

"On the 100th anniversary of the Triangle Shirtwaist Factory Fire, little has changed in the global sweatshop economy. Workers are again trapped and burned to death behind locked exit gates."


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Kelly Collinsworth's curator insight, April 16, 8:42 AM

For Beth Manor

Courtney Barrowman's curator insight, April 24, 11:28 AM

unit 6

Danielle Bellefeuille's curator insight, May 10, 6:16 PM

The sad reality of the new division of labor, we are moving backwards instead of forwards with labor policies and widening the gap between core and periphery countries. We need to stand up and advocate for fair trade. These countries rely on us for sources of unemployment, and we need to give them better wages, safer working conditions, and help them push pass this dependency, and grow into more economically and socially strong countries.

 

http://www.laborrights.org

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The Science behind Google Earth

The Science behind Google Earth | Teachers Toolbox | Scoop.it

"Google is using a new technology to automatically generate  3D buildings from 45-degree angle aerial photography made by overlapping passes of aircraft.  The aerial photos are combined to create 3D models."


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Annenkov's curator insight, April 16, 12:46 AM

This technology of visualization I would name "3D landscape"

Mirta Liliana Filgueira's curator insight, April 16, 8:40 PM

Tecnología para generar imágenes en 3D con Google Earth

Sid McIntyre-DeLaMelena's curator insight, May 29, 2:06 PM

Google Earth has made the Earth easier to decipher and examine in a geographical sense of location and place by being able to see multiple layers. This article goes into the 3D designs and usage of aerial photography to create 3D images.

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The Next America

The Next America | Teachers Toolbox | Scoop.it
Demographic transformations are dramas in slow motion. America is in the midst of two right now. Our population is becoming majority non-white at the same time a record share is going gray.

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Character Minutes's curator insight, April 20, 11:52 AM

Very interesting chart of how the demographics of U.S. Is changing.

Courtney Barrowman's curator insight, April 24, 11:25 AM

unit 2

CB New Hire Onboarding's curator insight, April 25, 9:35 AM

"The demographic shifts in the United States are transforming the cultural fabric of the country and this interactive feature from the Pew Research Center explores some of these changes.  Interracial marriage, declining fertility rates, migration, economic opportunities and politics are just some of the issues that can be seen in these excellent populations pyramids, charts, videos and graphs." - Seth Dixon 

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Using State Maps in School

Using State Maps in School | Teachers Toolbox | Scoop.it

"Have you ever seen a map and marveled over all of the information that it contains? It is incredible how maps can capture so much of the real world and depict so many places. From big cities to small towns, maps use characteristics such as topography, hydrography, industry, and recreation to tell the story of a place."


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Sid McIntyre-DeLaMelena's curator insight, May 29, 2:03 PM

Using maps in school is a concern for many educators that know the value of map skills. This article romanticizes maps and the importance of maps and studying them.

Maps are important for location as they can show absolute location to relative location and help with mental maps.

miya harris's curator insight, August 21, 10:10 AM

I think that it is very smart to show large scale maps in schools.Large scale maps can help students to understand their locations better because they can see them in greater detail.Roads,buildings,and water element become more clear.I think every school should have a large scale map to help students better under stand their town, county, or state.

Rachael Johns's curator insight, August 21, 9:31 PM

This is a great idea because students will be able to learn more with the hands on action. Most students just write or copy down notes that they don't really pay attention to but with this the student is more likely to learn from it because they have to measure out where to put the location, name the place that they're plotting, and put the note beside it about why it's important. This will also help students learn the location of places better because they're the ones actually making the map.     ~ R.J ~

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WATCH: Yup, The English Language Is Insane

WATCH: Yup, The English Language Is Insane | Teachers Toolbox | Scoop.it
Seriously, what is with the English language? Why is the plural of box boxes, but the plural of ox oxen? It makes no sense, people!

ASAP Thought's poem "English is Crazy" helps us break down all the ways English is well, insane. Grammar...
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Aerial Photographs Catalogue the Life and Death of Volcanic Islands

Aerial Photographs Catalogue the Life and Death of Volcanic Islands | Teachers Toolbox | Scoop.it

Volcanic islands can seem to appear out of nowhere, emerging from the ocean like breaching monsters of the deep. Below, Mika McKinnon explains how these odd geological formations are born, how they evolve, and how they eventually vanish back beneath the waves.


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Helen Rowling's curator insight, April 17, 4:55 PM

Geographical wonders.

Jessica Rieman's curator insight, April 23, 6:14 PM

In many cases these islands that become seriously dangerous started off being very small and then erupted causing formations of small islands next to them or attached and then creating erupting volcanic islands.

Elizabeth Bitgood's curator insight, April 24, 7:59 PM

This article gives a good description of how volcanic islands grow and then die.  It has beautiful pictures of these types of islands.

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Portraits of Reconciliation

Portraits of Reconciliation | Teachers Toolbox | Scoop.it
20 years after the genocide in Rwanda, these perpetrators and survivors are standing for forgiveness.
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Two Dollar Bill Is Oddity, but Some Love the Tender

Two Dollar Bill Is Oddity, but Some Love the Tender | Teachers Toolbox | Scoop.it
One billion are in circulation, but it has always lagged in popularity behind the $1 bill.
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Earthquakes in the Classroom

"An 8.2-magnitude earthquake struck off the coast of northern Chile, generating a local tsunami.  The USGS reported the earthquake was centered 95 km (59 miles) northwest of Iquique at a depth of 20.1km (12.5 miles).  This video gives the context for this type of earthquake."  


Via Seth Dixon
Ms. Harrington's insight:

http://www.iris.edu/hq/programs/education_and_outreach/resources

 

Lesson Plans from the Incorporated Research Institutions for Seismology (IRIS)

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Seth Dixon's curator insight, April 2, 11:09 AM

I woke up this morning to news of a large earthquake in Chile (security camera video footage).  IRIS (Incorporated Research Institutions for Seismology) creates teaching resources for teachers who want to use the current events such as yesterday's earthquake in Chile as an opportunity to discuss earth's physical systems and how they impact humanity.  They've produces slides, animations and PDFs for classroom use all while you were sleeping last night.  


Tags: visualization, disasters, physical, Chile.

dilaycock's curator insight, April 3, 2:02 AM

From Seth Dixon: 

 "IRIS(Incorporated Research Institutions for Seismology) creates teaching resources for teachers who want to use the current events such as yesterday's earthquake in Chile as an opportunity to discuss earth's physical systems and how they impact humanity.  They've produces slides, animations and PDFs for classroom use all while you were sleeping last night."  

Geofreak's curator insight, April 3, 1:37 PM

Hoe ontstond deze tsunami precies?

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The Most And Least Sprawling Cities In America

The Most And Least Sprawling Cities In America | Teachers Toolbox | Scoop.it

"Tracking changes in the shape of American cities over 10 years reveals which cities pack the most into a small space, but don't worry, sprawlers: Los Angeles shows you can change your fate."


Today’s nearly 314 million U.S. residents will expand to 401 million in less than 40 years. Wherever you fall on the cultural spectrum between country and city mouse, the fact remains that we simply won’t be able to use up resources the way we do now in sprawling suburbs shaped by car culture.  See also this infographic depicting those with the worst sprawl. 

 

Tags: density, sustainability, housing, urban, planning, unit 7 cities. 


Via Seth Dixon
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Geofreak's curator insight, April 3, 1:35 PM

Ruimtelijk ordening, stedelijke gebieden

VS

L.Long's curator insight, April 15, 6:57 PM

Urban  Dynamics

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Vietnam War Hero who blinked “torture” in Morse code dies

Vietnam War Hero who blinked “torture” in Morse code dies | Teachers Toolbox | Scoop.it
(from CBS News) - Prisoner of war Jeremiah Denton declared his loyalty to the U.S. government during a 1966 interview for what was supposed
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Google Maps Displays Crimean Border Differently In Russia, U.S.

Google Maps Displays Crimean Border Differently In Russia, U.S. | Teachers Toolbox | Scoop.it
In Russia, Google Maps now shows the Crimean Peninsula as part of Russian territory. The service shows a different image on browsers in the U.S.

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Matt Black: The Geography of Poverty

Matt Black: The Geography of Poverty | Teachers Toolbox | Scoop.it
Mapping poverty and powerlessness through geotagged photographs.

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Seth Dixon's curator insight, April 22, 12:37 PM

This is a beautiful and somewhat haunting curation of poverty images that are all geotagged and index with the hashtag #geographyofpoverty.  The black and white photograph adds a great dimension to the stark images. 

Stephen Zimmett's curator insight, April 22, 4:29 PM

Interesting photos all in California

Courtney Barrowman's curator insight, June 18, 11:42 AM

unit 6

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The World's Largest Trees

"The world's second-largest known tree, the President, in Sequoia National Park is photographed by National Geographic magazine photographer Michael 'Nick' Nichols for the December 2012 issue."


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Hemant Galviya's curator insight, April 17, 2:55 AM

hiiiiiiiiiiii

Miroslav Sopko's curator insight, April 18, 11:44 AM

Najväčšie stromy sveta.

Basant Kerketta's curator insight, April 21, 4:26 AM

Magnificent !!!

These kind must be saved.

Wish I could plant and replicate this size and height here in my home town.

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The Town that is Literally Living Under a Rock

The Town that is Literally Living Under a Rock | Teachers Toolbox | Scoop.it

"People choose to live in some pretty baffling places, like those towns sitting at the base of volcanos or the precariously placed monasteries in the Himalayan mountains. Here’s one that looks like it might have been hit by a meteor and residents just decided to carry on as usual…Welcome to the town of Setenil de las Bodegas in Spain, where around 3,000 inhabitants are living quite literally, under a rock."


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dilaycock's curator insight, April 8, 6:38 PM

An extreme example of the built environment working with the natural one. I don't think, however, that I'd be able to sleep well with this very visible weight hanging over my head! 

Tracy Galvin's curator insight, April 16, 5:56 PM

these places are so beautiful! We forget how beautiful the natural environment really is.

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Feeding 9 Billion

Feeding 9 Billion | Teachers Toolbox | Scoop.it
When we think about threats to the environment, we tend to picture cars and smokestacks, not dinner. But the truth is, our need for food poses one of the biggest dangers to the planet.

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Will we be able to feed the entire population? How agriculture changes the landscape.

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dilaycock's curator insight, April 29, 6:00 PM

Excellent resource from National Geographic that offers a 5-step plan to deal with the issue of feeding the world's population.

Sally Egan's curator insight, April 30, 11:09 PM

Agricultural production is one of the ways in which people modify the environment more than any other.  Global population is expected to top out at around 9 billion around 2050, so will we be able to sustainably feed all of the entire human population?  This one question brings up many more spatial, environmental, political and social questions--this interactive feature nicely addresses many of the pertinent issues in a very accessible manner.   

 

This article relates well to the Population topic in Global Challenges and issues that arise from the present growth patterns.  

Sid McIntyre-DeLaMelena's curator insight, May 29, 1:59 PM

As population continues to grow and agricultural lands dissappear, the issue of feeding the world is becoming a growing concern.

The environmental places of the world are becoming arid and the agrarian places are dwindling affecting the human/environment interaction by introducing agricultural issues.

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Largest glacier calving ever filmed

"On May 28, 2008, Adam LeWinter and Director Jeff Orlowski filmed a historic breakup at the Ilulissat Glacier in Western Greenland. The calving event lasted for 75 minutes and the glacier retreated a full mile across a calving face three miles wide. The height of the ice is about 3,000 feet, 300-400 feet above water and the rest below water."

 

Tags: physical, geomorphology, landforms, erosion, climate change, Greenland.


Via Seth Dixon
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More information at www.chasingice.com

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Flaviu Fesnic's comment, April 12, 3:31 PM
impressive !
Maricarmen Husson's curator insight, April 13, 2:15 PM

Adam LeWinter and Director Jeff Orlowski filmed a historic breakup at the Ilulissat Glacier in Western Greenland

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New York City's Disappearing Mom-and-Pop Storefronts

New York City's Disappearing Mom-and-Pop Storefronts | Teachers Toolbox | Scoop.it
Two photographers set out to see what happened to small family businesses in New York City in a decade

Via Seth Dixon
Ms. Harrington's insight:

What a decade can do to a cultural landscape.

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Heidi Ames's curator insight, April 10, 10:49 AM

Awesome to use when studying the Northeast and Immigration.  How scenes change in a short time due to economy!

L.Long's curator insight, April 15, 6:55 PM

Changing nature of world cities

Jake Reardon's curator insight, April 21, 5:49 PM

To be honest I am surprised that "Mom and Pop" storefronts lasted this long in New York City. It just seems to me that as a city grows and rent prices go up the smaller store fronts would naturally be pushed out by larger conglomerates who would be more suited to handle the rent prices. Of course it is an old addeage of capitalism that as long as you offer a good product that consumers would be inclined to consume you can stay above water in even the most competitive locations. Although to me that would appear to have its limits. Perhaps the economic tides of the present in New York are that limit.

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Soviet Bus Stops

Soviet Bus Stops | Teachers Toolbox | Scoop.it

"Photographer Christopher Herwig has covered more than 30,000 km by car, bike, bus and taxi in 13 countries discovering and documenting these unexpected treasures of modern art. From the shores of the Black Sea to the endless Kazakh steppe, the bus stops show the range of public art from the Soviet era and give a rare glimpse into the creative minds of the time."


Via Seth Dixon
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Seth Dixon's curator insight, April 6, 11:47 AM

This is a delightful glimpse into a time gone by, and what makes it even more surprising is that few would expect such creative architecture to dot the cultural landscape of the old Soviet Union.  I was recently looking at a photo gallery of old Russian Orthodox churches and just like these Soviet bus stops, they are perfect subjects for classic cultural landscape studies.  Geography students can analyze and interpret the cultural, political and economic material landscape as this photographer has.  What do these elements of the landscape mean?  How does it make us re-evaluate the society that created them?   


Tags: Russia, culture, landscape.
 

Lola Ripollés's curator insight, April 7, 5:15 AM

Las paradas de autobus siempre han sido algo interesante para diseñar. Son oportunidad para, como dicen los ingleses, "make a satement" y esta selección es prueba de ello. Herwig nos ofrece un buen muestrario de lo que se hizo en la antigua URSS.

54321ignition's curator insight, April 7, 7:14 AM

Uniformity has its place. But how brilliant would it be for communities and artists to be able to turn such utilitarian, soulless objects into celebrations of creativity!

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Supreme Court Strikes Down Limits On Campaign Spending – Big Sky, Big Money - FRONTLINE

Supreme Court Strikes Down Limits On Campaign Spending – Big Sky, Big Money - FRONTLINE | Teachers Toolbox | Scoop.it
The ruling, which strikes down certain limits on individual campaign contributions, all but ensures a greater role for wealthy donors in American politics.
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What to do with all that post-White House free time?

What to do with all that post-White House free time? | Teachers Toolbox | Scoop.it
President George W. Bush's artwork left us pondering, what exactly do presidents do to fill their days when they leave the White House?
Ms. Harrington's insight:

What do Presidents do after the leave the White House?

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In Pictures: Crackdown in Brazil's favelas

In Pictures: Crackdown in Brazil's favelas | Teachers Toolbox | Scoop.it
The Brazilian government's 'pacification' initiative has led to drug busts and shootouts in Rio's favelas.

 

Just a few months before Rio de Janeiro welcomes visitors for the World Cup, and two years before it hosts the Olympics, security within the city remains a major issue.  The government currently promotes the policy of "pacification", where security forces engage in raids, drug busts, and even gunfights with suspected gang members. This pacification policy is supposed to pave the way for the development of long-neglected favelas in Rio, Brazil's second-biggest city and home to 11 million people.  However, many of the favelas remain in the hands of an army of drug dealers and criminals who are not willing to step down or be pacified.


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Logging and Mudslides

Logging and Mudslides | Teachers Toolbox | Scoop.it
In recent decades the state allowed logging — with restrictions — on the plateau above the Snohomish County hillside that collapsed in last weekend’s deadly mudslide.

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bye bye's comment, May 8, 8:38 PM
i agree with hi hi
hi hi's comment, May 8, 8:38 PM
who is the nob that cares about logging and mud slides
bye bye's comment, May 8, 8:40 PM
u need help guys