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What is a part of the United States?


Via Seth Dixon
Ms. Harrington's insight:

The political geography of the United States and its associated territories

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MsPerry's curator insight, August 12, 2014 6:54 PM

APHG-U4

CHS AP Human Geography / Beth Gehle & Amy Rossello's curator insight, August 17, 2014 5:28 PM

Use in Political Geo unit, or for Canada and US region

Tanya Townsend's curator insight, October 12, 2015 11:09 PM

I honestly feel like we are never taught about these areas ever in US schools. We are always drilled about the 50 states and that's it. I would be interested in learning the history behind why this is still the case and what is keeping our government from considering them part of the states. The fact that they wont even consider American Samoa's citizens is a disgrace.

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It's Complicated: 5 Puzzling International Borders

It's Complicated: 5 Puzzling International Borders | Teachers Toolbox | Scoop.it

"Most of us think of international borders as invisible, but clear-cut lines: stand on one side, and you’re in one country; stand on the other, you’re in another country.  But here’s a list of five international borders that, for one reason or another, are not quite that simple."


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Seth Dixon's curator insight, July 12, 2013 9:20 AM

This article is in dire needs of some maps, but it still provides 5 intriguing case studies of borders and chunks of territory that defy normal categorization.


Tags: borders, political, territoriality, sovereignty.

Caterin Victor's curator insight, July 13, 2013 12:53 PM

It  is  Puzzling, but  every  human  being  chose to live in a normal,  happy  and  free  country, in a  Democratie,  if  possible.

Matthew DiLuglio's curator insight, October 12, 2013 7:20 PM

These borders and boundaries indicate something that I thought of while rewatching Independence Day (the Smith/Goldblum flick from '96)...  If we make a mess, and destroy this planet, aliens wouldn't want it.  The land that no one wants, is probably wanted by someone in reality... I am a fervent believer in aliens, and spend my free time diving into attempts to solve my quandary about the higher questions of the universe.  I think that the area that no one wants, everyone wants.  Unlike state boundaries in the US, planets are divided as separate entities from other planets, but grouped in solar systems, galaxies, asteroid belts, etc... I can't wait for the day some pompous fool gets on the bridge of a starship from Earth and sits in the captain's chair and says "Lieutenant, take us to Sector ----- (so and so)"... We will have moved up from the United States and Canada to the United Sectors of Galaxies!  And that little bit of land that 'no one wants,' everyone actually wants... same with planets.  Terraforming will allow those unsightly balls of fury that float around a star to become the most inhabitable of them all!  I wonder where these things will stop... or if it keeps going to larger sectors, endlessly? Well, we will likely encounter other species with territorial claims... play nice, America!  Or the Aliens will pop out of your stomach.  Though there are some politicians now that seem to have popped out of someone's stomach, I think the threat is more domestic while territory disputes occur nowadays, as it is humans arguing with humans, but it will increase when the Martians come to claim what is theirs.

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On Israel's system of segregated roads in the occupied Palestinian territories

On Israel's system of segregated roads in the occupied Palestinian territories | Teachers Toolbox | Scoop.it

Tags: MiddleEast, territoriality, transportation, borders, conflict, governance, political, unit 4 political. 


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Cam E's curator insight, March 4, 2014 11:32 AM

A relatively grim reminder that even things as clear-cut as road systems can be inherently political. This system forces segregation by the law of which roads can be driven on, but it's a good jumping point to remember that even the placement of roads can exclude or include communities. I'm reminded of the proposed idea for a NAFTA superhighway running through Mexico, Canada, and the US. One of the criticisms was that the highway would not provide exits for anywhere but major economics centers, effectively cutting off small towns from the rest of the area.

Zach & Wafeeq's curator insight, November 4, 2014 5:04 PM

Area/Geography: This is a diagram of what Israel is like for Palestinians and Israelis. It shows extremely restricted access for Palestinians. Whereas Israelis have all of the roads. This diagram fairly falls under the Area/Geography category because of the fact of how the Israeli government is manipulating the area/geography of the land of Israel to suit their best interest. 

Jacqueline Garcia pd1's curator insight, March 22, 2015 3:33 PM

Here one can see the political territoriality among Israel. For example in this article webpage we saw that people with Palestinian license plates can not drive on Israeli roads. This is one of the many instances where people are segregated according to their beliefs. 

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Military industrial complex: These 15 countries have the largest defense budgets

Military industrial complex: These 15 countries have the largest defense budgets | Teachers Toolbox | Scoop.it
World defense spending is expected to go up for the first time in five years, thanks to China and Russia.

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Jessica Rieman's curator insight, February 18, 2014 1:32 PM

Russia is the third highest goverment military that spends around 143 million people lived in Russia in 2012 and they spent around $475 per person on it's military. Russia compared to China and the US is another story the US is number one in who spent the most on their military forces at $600.4 billion. As far as China is concerened it comes in at number two at spending around  $112.2 billion. These numbers make sense especially for the power house that China is and how their values of militarism affect their spending and their way of society/life.

Edgar Manasseh Jr.'s curator insight, March 7, 2015 10:00 PM

Wow looking at all these defense military budgets show why some economies are not producing well, but at the same time its astonishing how much money is spent protecting homelands. It will grow in the next 5 years, and hopefully i'll be around to see what has changed who has taken the top position because i feel as if their will be a shift in the tides.

Jared Medeiros's curator insight, March 9, 2015 6:10 PM

Not surprised at many names on the list, but am surprised at The US figure, how much it costs per American, and at the gap between The US and China.  Its scary to see some of the names on the list though and wonder if they are using that money for defense, or an offensive attack.

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South Sudan: The World’s Newest Country

South Sudan: The World’s Newest Country | Teachers Toolbox | Scoop.it

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Lauren Stahowiak's curator insight, March 17, 2014 5:08 PM

South Sudan recently gained its independence from Sudan. South Sudan is now home to 10-12 million people and is the 193rd member of the United Nations. However, just because South Sudan became independent from Sudan does not mean it does not no longer carry some of the remaining issues.

Nathan Chasse's curator insight, March 25, 2014 1:26 PM

This infographic gives an idea of why South Sudan seceded from the rest of the country. Decades of civil war preceded the secession, and it is clear the cultural differences between the two areas were a contributing factor. South Sudan is a part of the fertile Sahel, with the majority of its people Christian, while Sudan is mostly desert, with the majority of its people Muslims. South Sudan, as a new nation, faces a number of difficulties. Its new government needed to remain stable to focus on nation building, but war has broken out between the government and a rebel faction. South Sudan, should it become stable again, should work to improve the education of its people, as the infographic explains, since the vote to secede needed symbols rather than words due to only 15% of its people being literate.

Jess Deady's curator insight, May 4, 2014 4:05 PM

South Sudan has separated itself two years ago from the rest of Sudan. Its powers have become acknowledged by other countries and its messages to the outside world are ones of peace.

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5 Stupidest Things Ever Done With Borders

5 Stupidest Things Ever Done With Borders | Teachers Toolbox | Scoop.it
Where you find a border, you usually find somebody pissed off about it.

 

Disclaimer: This article is more glib and crude in its language than I typically post.  However there is some great insight in this article about the curiosities that can occur on the borders that merits inclusion here.  Enclaves, walls, roads, glaciers, and tables all play prominent roles in these 5 quirky borders. 


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Ms. Harrington's comment, July 24, 2012 6:48 PM
Wow, I never knew border issues like this existed! Some are strange, but they live with the issue, like Canusa and the Netherlands/Belgium. Some are high tension, like Pakistan and India. I guess some of these issues are inevitable, the border has to go somewhere, and people over hundreds of years have moved outward.
Don Brown Jr's comment, July 25, 2012 7:09 PM
Although some of these boarders were established for security reasons, many more like the one along the American boarder seem to be constructed for more symbolic purposes as a physiological rather than a physical barrier.
Gregory S Sankey Jr.'s curator insight, December 4, 2013 3:24 PM

Within this article the author said it well, referencing that although these borders just seem silly and "stupid" to us, those who live within these boundaries must have an incredibly frustrating life. Having to hop three-four borders to get to the mainland of your country sounds completely crazy. I'm glad I live in Rhode Island.