Teachers Toolbox
Follow
Find tag "spatial"
228 views | +0 today
Teachers Toolbox
History and American Government Resources
Curated by Ms. Harrington
Your new post is loading...
Your new post is loading...
Rescooped by Ms. Harrington from Geography Education
Scoop.it!

Alluvial Fans

Alluvial Fans | Teachers Toolbox | Scoop.it
When streams emerge from mountains, they often spread out and deposit sediment in a distinctive pattern known as an alluvial fan.

Via Seth Dixon
Ms. Harrington's insight:

In dry areas of interior drainage the human settlements are often clustered along the foothills of the mountains near landforms called alluvial fans. 


Alluvial fans and the agricultural patterns that people create on them, show how human settlements are highly dependent of the physical environment.  

more...
Seth Dixon's curator insight, May 12, 12:58 PM

In dry areas of interior drainage (such as Central Asia and the Great Basin in the U.S.), the human settlements are often clustered along the foothills of the mountains near landforms called alluvial fans.  Take time to analyze this image (and this one as well); in alluvial fans and the agricultural patterns that people create on them, we can see some striking geometric and spatial configurations that show how human settlements are highly dependent of the physical environment.   


Tags: spatial, remote sensing, geospatial, Kazakhstan, Central Asialandscape.

Ignacio Garrido's curator insight, May 13, 8:41 PM

Exercise 26 .Use Moodle plattform to send your answers.

 

1. Where is taken this picture?

2. Define alluvial

3. How are used the alluvial? What economical sector?

4. Look at the image and calculate ( use the scala ) the distance between apex and tracks

5. Write a summarize of the article

Lorraine Chaffer's curator insight, May 23, 8:29 PM

Inland water year 10 , River landscapes year 8 

Rescooped by Ms. Harrington from Geography Education
Scoop.it!

Why Are States So Red and Blue?

Why Are States So Red and Blue? | Teachers Toolbox | Scoop.it
Theories about our right-wing and left-wing mind-sets don't explain why they are tied to geography.

 

While not endorsing all the cultural assumptions in the article, this is still an interesting exploration into expalining why distinct places are are politically aligned with particular parties. 

 

Questions to ponder: What portions of the author's argument do you agree (or disagree) with?  What do you see as the reasons behind the spatial distributions of "blue" and "red" in the United States? 

 

Tags: political, place, USA, culture, unit 4 political.


Via Seth Dixon
more...
BraydenJulietteGeo's comment, November 21, 2013 10:26 AM
this is a extremely interesting article on how certain portions of our country are know for voting for certain political party's during presidential elections. We have seen this political pattern all through our history, and can now almost always guess what states will be red or blue when it comes time for elections. Because this talks about political party's I have put this under political
Rescooped by Ms. Harrington from Geography Education
Scoop.it!

2012 Election Cartograms

2012 Election Cartograms | Teachers Toolbox | Scoop.it

I'm sure most of you have seen the 2008 version of these fantastic maps and cartograms and they've been a go-to reference for me since the last election.  The typical red state/blue state map conceals much concerning the spatial voting patterns in the United States and fails to account for the population densities of these distributions.  That's what makes this county level voting maps and cartograms so valuable.  

 

Questions to Ponder: What new patterns can you see in the county map that you couldn't see in the state map?  What do the cartograms tell you about the United States population?  

 

Tags: cartography, mapping, rural, zbestofzbest.


Via Seth Dixon
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Ms. Harrington from Geography Education
Scoop.it!

The Geography of Swing States

The Geography of Swing States | Teachers Toolbox | Scoop.it
Right now, the conventional wisdom says that there are just nine states that might go either way on Nov.

 

Not all votes are created equally; votes in these 9 key states have a greater likelihood of impacting the actual outcome of the Presidential election.  If we assume that the other states vote as anticipated, and that each candidate has an equal opportunity in the remaining 9 states (yes, these are a major assumptions, but work with me), than President Obama has a 84% likelihood of winning in the 512 possible permuations.  Geographer Andy Baker has created a video that provides a solid non-partisan analysis of the political geography of these states (and other) states.   

 

Tags: political, unit 4 political.


Via Seth Dixon
more...
No comment yet.