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The Geography of Language

"Over the course of human history, thousands of languages have developed from what was once a much smaller number. How did we end up with so many? And how do we keep track of them all? Alex Gendler explains how linguists group languages into language families, demonstrating how these linguistic trees give us crucial insights into the past."


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Catherine Smyth's curator insight, June 2, 4:45 PM

Not really primary geography but so interesting!

Woodstock School's curator insight, June 4, 3:05 AM

A good teaching tool for explaining the diversity of languages.

Adilson Camacho's curator insight, June 12, 6:38 PM

Geografia Cultural

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A Map of Baseball Nation

A Map of Baseball Nation | Teachers Toolbox | Scoop.it

"Fans may not list which team they favor on the census, but millions of them do make their preferences public on Facebook. Using aggregated data provided by the company, we were able to create an unprecedented look at the geography of baseball fandom, going down not only to the county level, as Facebook did in a nationwide map it released a few weeks ago, but also to ZIP codes."


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Brian Altonen's curator insight, April 25, 4:51 PM

Anything can be mapped.  

 

This mapping did not fully account for hybridization--for example when a friend in Texas is a Boston Red Sox fan.

Courtney Barrowman's curator insight, April 28, 7:43 AM

unit 1 & 3

Greg Russak's curator insight, April 29, 9:53 AM

Maps and baseball - a good combination!

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The Geography of Small Talk

The Geography of Small Talk | Teachers Toolbox | Scoop.it
Surprising alternatives to "so what do you do?"—from New Orleans to New York.

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Seth Dixon's curator insight, April 23, 4:48 PM

The types of questions that you ask when you are meeting someone new for the first time has some regional variations but there is much more to the geography of small talk than that as see in this 4 minute video.  People want to understand your cultural, ethnic, socioeconomic context by asking spatial questions about where you are from.  Identity and place are tightly woven and these neighborhood questions are almost invitations to share much more personal information, as if to ask, "how do you fit in this world?"  When you are being introduced to someone, what are the questions that you ask, and what type of information are you hoping to get?  Each person has their own little geography that has profoundly shaped who they are---so what’s your story? 


Tags: language, regions, folk cultures, communityplace, neighborhood.

Courtney Barrowman's curator insight, April 24, 6:43 AM

unit 2-3

Mr Steven Newman's curator insight, April 24, 11:33 AM
Love this scoop from Seth Dixon. A nice way to help kids understand sense of place .
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Online Quizzes for Regional Geography

Online Quizzes for Regional Geography | Teachers Toolbox | Scoop.it

"it is very difficult to intelligently discuss European issues if you don’t know the countries of Europe, where they are and what other countries are on their borders.  ...  I like the Lizard Point Geography quizzes, Sheppard Software quizzes and those from Click that ‘Hood; they are simple, straightforward and comprehensive."


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AckerbauHalle's curator insight, January 23, 9:44 PM

Kleiner Beitrag zur Geographie: Ein online Spiel um regionale Kenntnisse zu erweitern 

Mirta Liliana Filgueira's curator insight, February 2, 3:52 PM

Exámenes en línea para Geografía.

SFDSLibrary's curator insight, May 13, 5:16 AM

Quizzes to test a students knowledge of places and countries.

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The End of the Solid South

The End of the Solid South | Teachers Toolbox | Scoop.it
The region's emerging majority is progressive. Its capitols are more conservative than ever. Something's got to give.

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Where Does the South Begin?

Where Does the South Begin? | Teachers Toolbox | Scoop.it
Roads? Religion? Accent? Food? Which factor dictates where the North ends?

 

This is a great intellectual expercise to help student think about regions and how we define them.  The article can help also inform some of their thinking since one of the main problems for students in drawing regional boundaries is a lack of place-based knowledge.   

 

Tags: regions, USA.


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Matthew DiLuglio's curator insight, October 12, 2013 3:49 PM

Borders... the first thing I think of was a giant bookstore near my hometown... it now ceases to exist, having been replaced by Barnes and Nobel...  As for the political organization of space, I could apply this situation and laugh.  Borders will cease to be, and they will be called after people's last names!  I think this has already happened, when people unite together in countries such as the USA- although borders are specific, the general federal laws and many policies still apply in all states... generally. And people's names are often the namesakes of places.  I don't like the idea of borders, though, it seems like a bunch of warmongers trying to get ahead in a world where they can't truly cheat death, so they cheat other people of land that may have been decreed in ancient documents as property of their ancestors, or even in accordance with the righteousness of the universe and what should be alloted to whom.  Ownership is a concept of denial, because no one can truly own anything, not even our bodies, which contain trillions of infinite universes the size of the large one around us that we commonly refer to.  Borders are relative, and will likely become recognized as obsolete.  I know this was abstract, but it's my thoughts on the topic.

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The Geography of Swing States

The Geography of Swing States | Teachers Toolbox | Scoop.it
Right now, the conventional wisdom says that there are just nine states that might go either way on Nov.

 

Not all votes are created equally; votes in these 9 key states have a greater likelihood of impacting the actual outcome of the Presidential election.  If we assume that the other states vote as anticipated, and that each candidate has an equal opportunity in the remaining 9 states (yes, these are a major assumptions, but work with me), than President Obama has a 84% likelihood of winning in the 512 possible permuations.  Geographer Andy Baker has created a video that provides a solid non-partisan analysis of the political geography of these states (and other) states.   

 

Tags: political, unit 4 political.


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Defining 'the South'

Defining 'the South' | Teachers Toolbox | Scoop.it

"The Southerners were considerably more certain of which states are their own. While the top few Midwest states barely pulled 80 percent of the vote, nearly 90 percent of respondents identified Georgia and Alabama as Southern, and more than 80 percent placed Mississippi and Louisiana in the South. South Carolina, Tennessee, Florida and North Carolina all garnered above 60 percent."


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Elizabeth Lewis's curator insight, May 3, 7:50 AM

Civil War - maps

Cécile C-A's curator insight, May 7, 1:10 PM

Qu'est-ce que le sud? 

A comparer avec le travail de B. Radkin à propos du Midwest:

http://www.radicalcartography.net/index.html?midwest

Lauren Sellers's curator insight, May 28, 8:56 PM

The South looks different to each state. I've heard some base it off of the accents and some even base it off of BBQ. its funny to see which states consider other states to be part of "The South" and which ines they dont.

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The Geography of Small Talk

The Geography of Small Talk | Teachers Toolbox | Scoop.it
Surprising alternatives to "so what do you do?"—from New Orleans to New York.

Via Seth Dixon
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Seth Dixon's curator insight, April 23, 4:48 PM

The types of questions that you ask when you are meeting someone new for the first time has some regional variations but there is much more to the geography of small talk than that as see in this 4 minute video.  People want to understand your cultural, ethnic, socioeconomic context by asking spatial questions about where you are from.  Identity and place are tightly woven and these neighborhood questions are almost invitations to share much more personal information, as if to ask, "how do you fit in this world?"  When you are being introduced to someone, what are the questions that you ask, and what type of information are you hoping to get?  Each person has their own little geography that has profoundly shaped who they are---so what’s your story? 


Tags: language, regions, folk cultures, communityplace, neighborhood.

Courtney Barrowman's curator insight, April 24, 6:43 AM

unit 2-3

Mr Steven Newman's curator insight, April 24, 11:33 AM
Love this scoop from Seth Dixon. A nice way to help kids understand sense of place .
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Human Development Index variation

Human Development Index variation | Teachers Toolbox | Scoop.it

"Here's how the United States looks when it is measured on the county level by the same standards used to rank countries by the UN, the Human Development Index.  Five variables are taken into account: life expectancy, income per capita, school enrollment, percentage of high school graduates, and percentage of college graduates." 


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Ms. Harrington's insight:

Regional patterns?

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Lara N. Madden's curator insight, March 26, 10:10 AM

My thought when I see this map is if Alaska was to scale the low indicator is of off the charts. Also note the dark areas are on the main road systems and include 2 large military bases. The author is focused on the south, but does not say anything about the north. Interesting.

steve smith's curator insight, March 26, 12:53 PM

A fantastic resource for development studies.

Brian Altonen's curator insight, March 26, 6:18 PM

A WHO map of what life in the U.S. is like demonstrates the role of urbanization and heavily population regions for defining where U.N.'s Human Development Index scores are highest.

Three of the metrics pertain primarily to education.  The fourth is a measure of financial success for a region.  The fifth is most likely a consequence of scoring well for these first four measures.

An obvious next step in making additional use of this map is to compare its findings with the distributions of various language, culture and ethnic groups in this country, according to most recent US Census patterns.  

 

 

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Places in their Proper Perspectives

Places in their Proper Perspectives | Teachers Toolbox | Scoop.it

"A fisherman's cottage is described by real estate agents as a 'property not to be missed' but it is also just yards away from two nuclear power stations."


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Adilson Camacho's curator insight, January 31, 3:19 PM

Versões...

Fern Torres's curator insight, February 3, 1:11 PM

Perception is everything!

Jess Deady's curator insight, April 16, 10:35 AM

This house is 100% misleading. The paper advertised the first picture, which from the looks of it isn't so bad. Then when you get the reverse picture and see the nuclear power plants behind it, its a whole new scene! Whoever is trying to sell this house- good luck to you. Who wants to live next to something that could literally kill god knows what? Not me. 

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American English Dialects

American English Dialects | Teachers Toolbox | Scoop.it

There are 8 major English dialect areas in North America, presented on the map. These are shown in blue, each with its number, on the map and in the Dialect Description Chart below, and are also outlined with blue lines on the map.  The many subdialects are shown in red on the map and in the chart, and are outlined with red lines on the map. All of these are listed in the margins of the map as well.


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Ms. Harrington's insight:

Very cool map with links to video/audio of the local dialect.

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Susan Lindell Radke's comment, May 16, 2013 1:26 PM
Looks like the YouTube links don't work. YT account terminated?
Fotografie Turismo Italia's comment, May 17, 2013 2:07 AM
I don't know this problem, sorry.
Leslie Creath's curator insight, May 27, 2013 10:41 AM

This is fascinating to me

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2012 Election Cartograms

2012 Election Cartograms | Teachers Toolbox | Scoop.it

I'm sure most of you have seen the 2008 version of these fantastic maps and cartograms and they've been a go-to reference for me since the last election.  The typical red state/blue state map conceals much concerning the spatial voting patterns in the United States and fails to account for the population densities of these distributions.  That's what makes this county level voting maps and cartograms so valuable.  

 

Questions to Ponder: What new patterns can you see in the county map that you couldn't see in the state map?  What do the cartograms tell you about the United States population?  

 

Tags: cartography, mapping, rural, zbestofzbest.


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