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Uneven Population Distribution

Uneven Population Distribution | Teachers Toolbox | Scoop.it

"60% of Iceland's population lives in the red area."


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Seth Dixon's curator insight, May 7, 2014 9:02 AM

Similar to Iceland, Australia's population is also highly clustered.    


Questions to Ponder: Why is Iceland's population so highly clustered?  What is it about the red (and white) areas on the map that explain this pattern?  What other layers of information do we need to properly contextualize this information?  


Tags: Iceland, population, density.

Sid McIntyre-DeLaMelena's curator insight, May 29, 2014 12:39 PM

The majority of Iceland's population lives in that one space.

The geography of Iceland keeps the majority of people in the place that sustains life and comfort the best and easiest.

Kaitlin Young's curator insight, December 13, 2014 10:50 AM

Iceland is a beautiful place, yet hash climates and landscapes make it hard for equal population distribution. At the same time, its population is under 400,000 people, making it a relatively small population compared to those of other European countries. With a population that small, it almost makes sense for people to live closer to one another. It would be easier to build infrastructure in a smaller area than to spread it out all over the island, where it would hardly be utilized. Also, the one densely populated area allows for a creative center where money and ideas can be developed.

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The Next America

The Next America | Teachers Toolbox | Scoop.it
Demographic transformations are dramas in slow motion. America is in the midst of two right now. Our population is becoming majority non-white at the same time a record share is going gray.

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CB New Hire Onboarding's curator insight, April 25, 2014 9:35 AM

"The demographic shifts in the United States are transforming the cultural fabric of the country and this interactive feature from the Pew Research Center explores some of these changes.  Interracial marriage, declining fertility rates, migration, economic opportunities and politics are just some of the issues that can be seen in these excellent populations pyramids, charts, videos and graphs." - Seth Dixon 

Amanda Morgan's comment, September 18, 2014 10:46 AM
The demographic shifts will most definitely have an impact on politics and economic opportunities. With as many 85 year olds as 5 year olds, we will see an increase in the need for health care and general overall care for the elderly. There will be more need for social security and retirement plans. While it is a good thing overall that life expectancy is increasing, it may create other issues.
Amanda Morgan's curator insight, September 18, 2014 10:48 AM

The demographic shifts will most definitely have an impact on politics and economic opportunities. With as many 85 year olds as 5 year olds, we will see an increase in the need for health care and general overall care for the elderly. There will be more need for social security and retirement plans. While it is a good thing overall that life expectancy is increasing, it may create other issues.

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Highly concentrated population distribution

Highly concentrated population distribution | Teachers Toolbox | Scoop.it

"Only 2% of Australia's population lives in the yellow area. "


Via Seth Dixon
Ms. Harrington's insight:

What could explain the density of the white area? What is it about the yellow area that explains the lack of population?

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Brian Wilk's curator insight, March 22, 7:30 PM

If you read this list you'll know why! From crocodiles to pythons and stonefish it's good to not live in the nether regions of Australia. There are even venomous centipedes and mad as hell cassowaries.

Mostly no surprise here as the coast is where most people will live given a choice. Plus the rainfall map shows us people will normally live nearest their food supply. In Australia's case the food is next to the population base as dictated by rainfall amounts. Still no bargain for the denizens of the country as these things called Great Whites are lurking offshore!

Devyn Hantgin's curator insight, March 23, 9:03 PM

How to recognize and interpret at different scales the relationships among patterns and processes

This map shows how little of a population lives in the majority of Australia. This map was made to show the relationship of population to coastal areas. The yellow area is not highly populated because it is very hot and dry. 

This relates to the unit because it is a map showing the relationship between population and coastline areas. In our class we learn to look at maps and data and find patterns and relationships within the information given. 

Jason Schneider's curator insight, April 9, 11:14 PM

Apparently, 2% of Australia's population lives mostly away from the coast between Australia and the ocean. Even though many countries have people who mostly live closer to the coast rather than closer to the middle at any given country, Australia has one of the lowest percentages of people living away from the coast that separates its country and the ocean. The main reason why many people rather live near the coast of a country is obviously because it's closer to the water. People rather live near the coast for fishing activities, farming and accessing to world trade. Also as you can see, most of the eastern part of Australia has many people that live in Australia. In that case, there are many tourists from Oceanic islands that visit the east side of Australia seeing as Oceania is east of Australia. Lastly, the middle/yellow area of Australia contains many desert areas and open grasslands so people would barely be able to live in that region.

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The World's Most Densely Populated Cities

The World's Most Densely Populated Cities | Teachers Toolbox | Scoop.it
The growth of these cities will create a host of environmental and health problems.

 

By 2210, the global population is expected to grow from just more than 7 billion to 11.3 billion — with 87 percent of the population living in urban areas, according to a new working paper by researchers from NYU’s Marron Institute.

Most of these individuals will be in what’s now the developing world — creating a host of environmental and health problems.

If projections are correct, these new urban dwellers will require the world’s existing cities to expand six-fold to accommodate triple the residents, Richard Florida wrote in The Atlantic. Plus, the world will need 500 new “megacities” of 10 million or more, he wrote.


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Valerie Bauwens's curator insight, March 28, 2014 4:46 AM

Or will there be a natural come back to the country side?

Jessica Rieman's curator insight, April 2, 2014 5:42 PM

 Cairo, Egypt has a population density of 9,400 residents per square kilometer. THese numbers are crazy think about it compared to MA or RI and our major cities.

MsPerry's curator insight, August 12, 2014 8:03 PM

APHG-U2 & U6

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Understanding Global Statistics

Understanding Global Statistics | Teachers Toolbox | Scoop.it

"Infographics to explain global statistics."


Via Seth Dixon
Ms. Harrington's insight:

Great graphic.

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Leoncio Lopez-Ocon's curator insight, August 27, 2013 3:49 PM

Un conjunto de sencillas infografias para visualizar estadisticas de la humanidad en el tiempo presente

trampolinecalf's comment, September 27, 2013 2:46 AM
good one
Sid McIntyre-DeLaMelena's curator insight, May 29, 2014 12:11 PM

If the World was 100 People shows the statistics of the world as in smaller proportions allowing them to be easily visualized.

Some of the graphics divide the people into regions and nationalities mainly as Formal by continents .

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Population pyramids: Powerful predictors of the future

"Population statistics are like crystal balls -- when examined closely, they can help predict a country's future (and give important clues about the past). Kim Preshoff explains how using a visual tool called a population pyramid helps policymakers and social scientists make sense of the statistics, using three different countries' pyramids as examples."


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Nancy Watson's curator insight, September 26, 2014 4:04 PM

Population unit

Lauren Quincy's curator insight, March 20, 1:51 PM

Unit 2: Population and Migration

 

This video was about how demographers categorize data and analyze it. This video showed a few different population pyramids in order to show differences in population in different countries. It showed China as an example and pointed out the remnants of the one child policy 35 years before and how the number of men were higher due to sex selective abortions. They also talked about how the population pyramids could show what stage in the demographic transition model a country was in and how they use them to predict future patterns and changes. 

 

This relates to unit 2 because it covers topics such as population change, demographic transition models, sex composition, population policies and much more. Population pyramids are very useful due to the visualization of sex, age and number composition in a countries population. They are very important in the use of predicting the future change in population because it can tell what the population has gone through in the past and what to expect in the DTM. 

Daniel Lindahl's curator insight, March 21, 10:43 PM

This video illustrates how population pyramids have the ability to show how populations will rise and fall over time. Pyramids specifically show the population based on a specific age, and illustrates a country's amount of young people in comparison to the elderly. 

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Changing Earth

Changing Earth | Teachers Toolbox | Scoop.it
Over the years, ISS astronauts have had a rare opportunity to witness climate change on Earth from space.

Via Seth Dixon
Ms. Harrington's insight:

City population growth evident from space.

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Sally Egan's curator insight, March 30, 2014 7:29 PM

A great illustation of the changes to the environment as a result of increasing technology and population. Plays for 1minute 30.

Sally Egan's curator insight, March 30, 2014 7:34 PM

A short but fascinating illustration of the rapid changes to areas of teh Earth, observed by astronauts since 2000. Plays for 1 minute 30.  

BI Media Specialists's curator insight, April 4, 2014 7:46 AM
This is a great resource for some of our science classes. It is an interesting presentation of the changes that we are making over time.
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Highly concentrated population distribution

Highly concentrated population distribution | Teachers Toolbox | Scoop.it

"Only 2% of Australia's population lives in the yellow area. "


Via Seth Dixon
more...
Brian Wilk's curator insight, March 22, 7:30 PM

If you read this list you'll know why! From crocodiles to pythons and stonefish it's good to not live in the nether regions of Australia. There are even venomous centipedes and mad as hell cassowaries.

Mostly no surprise here as the coast is where most people will live given a choice. Plus the rainfall map shows us people will normally live nearest their food supply. In Australia's case the food is next to the population base as dictated by rainfall amounts. Still no bargain for the denizens of the country as these things called Great Whites are lurking offshore!

Devyn Hantgin's curator insight, March 23, 9:03 PM

How to recognize and interpret at different scales the relationships among patterns and processes

This map shows how little of a population lives in the majority of Australia. This map was made to show the relationship of population to coastal areas. The yellow area is not highly populated because it is very hot and dry. 

This relates to the unit because it is a map showing the relationship between population and coastline areas. In our class we learn to look at maps and data and find patterns and relationships within the information given. 

Jason Schneider's curator insight, April 9, 11:14 PM

Apparently, 2% of Australia's population lives mostly away from the coast between Australia and the ocean. Even though many countries have people who mostly live closer to the coast rather than closer to the middle at any given country, Australia has one of the lowest percentages of people living away from the coast that separates its country and the ocean. The main reason why many people rather live near the coast of a country is obviously because it's closer to the water. People rather live near the coast for fishing activities, farming and accessing to world trade. Also as you can see, most of the eastern part of Australia has many people that live in Australia. In that case, there are many tourists from Oceanic islands that visit the east side of Australia seeing as Oceania is east of Australia. Lastly, the middle/yellow area of Australia contains many desert areas and open grasslands so people would barely be able to live in that region.

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Will saving poor children lead to overpopulation?

Hans Rosling explains a very common misunderstanding about the world. CC by www.gapminder.org

Via Seth Dixon
Ms. Harrington's insight:

A clear explanation of how saving the poor will slow population growth.

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