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What is a part of the United States?


Via Seth Dixon
Ms. Harrington's insight:

The political geography of the United States and its associated territories

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pascal simoens's curator insight, August 6, 2014 5:58 PM

qui m'a dit un jour que l'"Europe, c'est compliqué?"...

MsPerry's curator insight, August 12, 2014 6:54 PM

APHG-U4

CHS AP Human Geography / Beth Gehle & Amy Rossello's curator insight, August 17, 2014 5:28 PM

Use in Political Geo unit, or for Canada and US region

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America’s most gerrymandered congressional districts

America’s most gerrymandered congressional districts | Teachers Toolbox | Scoop.it
A brief overview of crimes against geography in the 113th Congress.

Via Seth Dixon
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Lauren Sellers's curator insight, May 29, 2014 10:04 AM

This concept is used to favor certain political parties in certain areas. There are rules like the ditrict has to be all connected but they can manipulate the redrawing to make it that a certain party still wins that district.

Sid McIntyre-DeLaMelena's curator insight, May 29, 2014 12:29 PM

A showing of the gerrymandering districts of the most absurd kind.

Gerrymandering bases itself off the place of the districts in an attempt to sway voting in favor of one party or another or even for the most equal by dealing with similar human characteristics.

Courtney Barrowman's curator insight, May 30, 2014 3:15 PM

unit 4

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Google Maps Displays Crimean Border Differently In Russia, U.S.

Google Maps Displays Crimean Border Differently In Russia, U.S. | Teachers Toolbox | Scoop.it

"America and its allies have refused to accept the region's separatist move to join Russia.  A look at the maps available on two Google Maps Web addresses — one ending in .com and another in .ru — shows the disparity. In Russia, Web visitors see a solid line dividing Crimea from neighboring Ukraine. In the U.S., a dotted line separates the two, implying a disputed status within the country."


Via Seth Dixon
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Seth Dixon's curator insight, April 29, 2014 2:53 PM

In this podcast we learn that this isn't the only international border dispute that is displayed differently in Google Maps.  Google uses over 30 distinct versions of international borders because there is an underlying geopolitical dimension to cartography.  This brings up more questions than it answers--How is the Kashmir displayed in India?  Pakistan?  The West Bank in Israel or Egypt?  If you haven't explored Google Maps in other languages, consider this your invitation to read maps as you would a text and to think about the political implications of making a map.   


Tags: google, mapping, borders, political.

Courtney Barrowman's curator insight, May 1, 2014 12:33 PM

unit 1 map bias!!!

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▶ How Many Countries Are There? - YouTube

Discuss this video: http://www.reddit.com/r/CGPGrey/comments/1p2m6g/how_many_countries_are_there/ Help support videos like this: http://www.cgpgrey.com/subba...

Via Nancy Watson
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Nancy Watson's curator insight, February 8, 2014 5:38 PM

state or not a state? Good for the Political unint

Colleen Blankenship's curator insight, May 18, 2014 3:24 PM

What constitutes a "state?"  Watch this video and make a determination.

Annie Pack's curator insight, June 25, 2014 1:10 PM

Country or not?? Interesting/confusing question! 

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The End of the Solid South

The End of the Solid South | Teachers Toolbox | Scoop.it
The region's emerging majority is progressive. Its capitols are more conservative than ever. Something's got to give.

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Interactives: War and Refugees

Interactives: War and Refugees | Teachers Toolbox | Scoop.it

UNHCR has been attempting to count the world's refugees since it was created. If you want to find out which years resulted in the worst displacement, which were the biggest countries of origin and which were the biggest countries of asylum, use the interactive map.


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It's Complicated: 5 Puzzling International Borders

It's Complicated: 5 Puzzling International Borders | Teachers Toolbox | Scoop.it

"Most of us think of international borders as invisible, but clear-cut lines: stand on one side, and you’re in one country; stand on the other, you’re in another country.  But here’s a list of five international borders that, for one reason or another, are not quite that simple."


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Seth Dixon's curator insight, July 12, 2013 9:20 AM

This article is in dire needs of some maps, but it still provides 5 intriguing case studies of borders and chunks of territory that defy normal categorization.


Tags: borders, political, territoriality, sovereignty.

Caterin Victor's curator insight, July 13, 2013 12:53 PM

It  is  Puzzling, but  every  human  being  chose to live in a normal,  happy  and  free  country, in a  Democratie,  if  possible.

Matthew DiLuglio's curator insight, October 12, 2013 7:20 PM

These borders and boundaries indicate something that I thought of while rewatching Independence Day (the Smith/Goldblum flick from '96)...  If we make a mess, and destroy this planet, aliens wouldn't want it.  The land that no one wants, is probably wanted by someone in reality... I am a fervent believer in aliens, and spend my free time diving into attempts to solve my quandary about the higher questions of the universe.  I think that the area that no one wants, everyone wants.  Unlike state boundaries in the US, planets are divided as separate entities from other planets, but grouped in solar systems, galaxies, asteroid belts, etc... I can't wait for the day some pompous fool gets on the bridge of a starship from Earth and sits in the captain's chair and says "Lieutenant, take us to Sector ----- (so and so)"... We will have moved up from the United States and Canada to the United Sectors of Galaxies!  And that little bit of land that 'no one wants,' everyone actually wants... same with planets.  Terraforming will allow those unsightly balls of fury that float around a star to become the most inhabitable of them all!  I wonder where these things will stop... or if it keeps going to larger sectors, endlessly? Well, we will likely encounter other species with territorial claims... play nice, America!  Or the Aliens will pop out of your stomach.  Though there are some politicians now that seem to have popped out of someone's stomach, I think the threat is more domestic while territory disputes occur nowadays, as it is humans arguing with humans, but it will increase when the Martians come to claim what is theirs.

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Out of Africa – Did the Colonial Powers ever Really Leave?

Out of Africa – Did the Colonial Powers ever Really Leave? | Teachers Toolbox | Scoop.it
Africa may have achieved independence, but the old colonial ties are still important as France’s decision to send troops to Mali to fight Islamist extremists shows.

Via Seth Dixon, AP US History
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Nathan Chasse's curator insight, March 25, 2014 12:59 PM

Colonial ties are still very prevalent due to Europe's dependence upon the resources of Africa. European countries like England and France invest billions in Africa, not to help those African nations, but to build infrastructure for resource extraction or to keep governments stable. Though the true exploitation of Africa has ended, the current situation certainly has the ring of exploitation as the people of Europe enjoy the diamonds and chocolate harvested by the multitudes of impoverished people of Africa.

Jess Deady's curator insight, May 4, 2014 4:04 PM

Colony powers are still located within Africa. Just because Africa is technically independent doesn't mean that British Colonial power isn't still in place.

Courtney Barrowman's curator insight, September 11, 2014 2:11 PM

unit 4

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WomanStats Maps

WomanStats Maps | Teachers Toolbox | Scoop.it

"The WomanStats Project is the most comprehensive compilation of information on the status of women in the world. The Project facilitates understanding the linkage between the situation of women and the security of nation-states. We comb the extant literature and conduct expert interviews to find qualitative and quantitative information on over 310 indicators of women's status in 174 countries. Our Database expands daily, and access to it is free of charge.  Click here if you are a new to the project."


Via Seth Dixon
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Seth Dixon's curator insight, March 30, 2013 7:48 PM
I have linked to the WomanStats Project in the past because their global datasets and maps are perfect for get students to explore a potential topic that might be of interest to them.  I'm resharing this now because they have recently updated their maps page to include 28 statistical measures to indicate the status of women around the world (including this one on the gendered discrepancy of access to secondary education).  The WomanStats Project provides important data and maps regarding issues of gender, access and equity with a spatial perspective.

Mary Rack's curator insight, March 31, 2013 7:44 AM

Amazing and thought-provoking. 

Daniel Landi's curator insight, April 1, 2013 2:08 AM

Topic link: Population and Change: Gender

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A Crazy But Rational Solution To Our Electoral College Problem

A Crazy But Rational Solution To Our Electoral College Problem | Teachers Toolbox | Scoop.it
On three different occasions, the candidate with the most votes didn't become President of the United States. We call this "The Electoral College Problem." Here a solution. Simple. Mathematical. Rational.

Via Seth Dixon
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Ken Halpern's comment, March 1, 2013 1:20 PM
Interesting idea but I don't think either political parties will go for it unless it favors them. However, I am not in favor of increasing the number of House Reps. We spend too much money as it is funding the government. I think we should get rid of the old system and simply go by popular vote.
Gary Pascoa's comment, March 1, 2013 9:43 PM
I know the founding fathers would be horrified as this cuts into the whole idea of the electoral college: to place a further check on the majority when electing a president. Nonetheless, I would support a redrawing of the map that would lean toward a popular vote system.
Conor McCloskey's comment, March 4, 2013 8:27 PM
Interesting idea, however I can't say this is a "rational" solution to the Electoral College. It is actually completely irrational to think that the borders could be redrawn and everyone could be redistricted every four years... They can't even manage to get a census out every year... Logistical nightmare. I agree with Ken and Gary, let the people choose with the popular vote
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Israel and Palestine

Watch this Jewish Voice for Peace 6 minute mini-primer about why Israelis and Palestinians are fighting..



Via Seth Dixon
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Maegan Connor's curator insight, December 17, 2013 7:34 PM

This video is a really helpful, simplified explanation of the fighting in Israel that is fiercely complicated and has gone on for decades now with one repressed group repressing another. If I ever need to explain the struggle to students, this video would be an excellent introduction.

Shanelle Zaino's curator insight, October 27, 2014 9:40 PM

This was a very understated and poignant  video. The simplicity and directness was very powerful. It was very interesting to see this conflict, that had taken place in this area presented in such a way. Around the time of WWII about 7% of this area  was occupied by Jewish people, currently they occupy almost 100%.  I commend the Jewish Voice for showing this conflict in a different light. Showing that both sides may have been in the wrong .

James Hobson's curator insight, October 28, 2014 9:58 AM

(Africa topic 1)

{{Note: Some topics and locations pertain to multiple geographic regions (i.e. northern Africa, the Middle East, and southwestern Asia, and topics in different regions may refer to the same country or location because of this.}}

I found it interesting to watch a video that comes from an implied anti-Israel standpoint, especially since the organization which made this video is called the Jewish Voice for Peace. Though there has always been disagreement as to who should occupy some of the most hallowed land in the world, it seems that the Israeli-Palestinian conflict stems more out of the UN repartitioning plan. Regardless of clashing religions and cultures, it does seem unfair that a minority of people control the majority of land and resources. This makes me wonder why exactly the UN made the Israeli state there: was is purely because of the Jewish religion associations?, or because no other country wanted to absorb the increasing number of refugees?, or because the UN wanted to gain a stronghold in the Middle East?, or perhaps a combination of all of the above?

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2012 Election Cartograms

2012 Election Cartograms | Teachers Toolbox | Scoop.it

I'm sure most of you have seen the 2008 version of these fantastic maps and cartograms and they've been a go-to reference for me since the last election.  The typical red state/blue state map conceals much concerning the spatial voting patterns in the United States and fails to account for the population densities of these distributions.  That's what makes this county level voting maps and cartograms so valuable.  

 

Questions to Ponder: What new patterns can you see in the county map that you couldn't see in the state map?  What do the cartograms tell you about the United States population?  

 

Tags: cartography, mapping, rural, zbestofzbest.


Via Seth Dixon
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Wilmine Merlain's curator insight, November 1, 2014 11:16 PM

I'm really glad at how the cartographer of this map was able to properly demonstrate the way the American population voted during the 2012 presidential  election. Unlike the map that we are accustomed to seeing on television during political elections. What I appreciate about this map is how it tries to represent the way in which Americans caste their votes. While you'd be led to believe that certain states voted a particular way, this map proves otherwise. Another thing that this map does is represent the states that are widely considered to be Republican, and Democratic. States that tend to be in favor of GDP are conservative states, such as that of the south with the exception of FL, and the rest of the country being fairly liberal. Nonetheless, this is definitely and interesting and telling map of our patterns as voters.

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Why Are States So Red and Blue?

Why Are States So Red and Blue? | Teachers Toolbox | Scoop.it
Theories about our right-wing and left-wing mind-sets don't explain why they are tied to geography.

 

While not endorsing all the cultural assumptions in the article, this is still an interesting exploration into expalining why distinct places are are politically aligned with particular parties. 

 

Questions to ponder: What portions of the author's argument do you agree (or disagree) with?  What do you see as the reasons behind the spatial distributions of "blue" and "red" in the United States? 

 

Tags: political, place, USA, culture, unit 4 political.


Via Seth Dixon
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BraydenJulietteGeo's comment, November 21, 2013 1:26 PM
this is a extremely interesting article on how certain portions of our country are know for voting for certain political party's during presidential elections. We have seen this political pattern all through our history, and can now almost always guess what states will be red or blue when it comes time for elections. Because this talks about political party's I have put this under political
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Where Will The World's Water Conflicts Erupt?

Where Will The World's Water Conflicts Erupt? | Teachers Toolbox | Scoop.it

As the climate shifts, rivers will both flood and dry up more often, according to the latest report from the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change. Shortages are especially likely in parts of the world already strapped for water, so political scientists expect feuds will become even more intense. To track disputes worldwide, researchers at Oregon State University spent a decade building a comprehensive database of international exchanges—-both conflicts and alliances—over shared water resources. They found that countries often begin disputes belligerently but ultimately reach peaceful agreements. Says Aaron Wolf, the geographer who leads the project, “For me the really interesting part is how even Arabs and Israelis, Indians and Pakistanis, are able to resolve their differences and find a solution.”


Via Seth Dixon
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Ma. Caridad Benitez's curator insight, June 19, 2014 9:44 AM

El bien más preciado.  El recurso agotable más subvalorado del planeta. 

Adilson Camacho's curator insight, June 20, 2014 2:50 PM

Questões políticas... 

J. Mark Schwanz's curator insight, June 21, 2014 11:01 AM

Add water to geography education curriculum? You better believe it. The crisis of the 21st century is and will be water.  

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22 International Borders

22 International Borders | Teachers Toolbox | Scoop.it

"Brazil (top) and Bolivia (bottom)."


Via Seth Dixon
Ms. Harrington's insight:

Borders can tell us a great feel about the relationship beween the two  nations.

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Jason Wilhelm's curator insight, May 22, 2014 12:52 PM

The concept of a political boundary has been developed over many many years into an unbreakable line between two different sets of people with different ideologies, religions, and government styles. The boundary extends into the ground, into the air, and includes any resources within the boundary. These pictures show the different shapes and various lines between countries, and displays the intricacies of boundaries in the world.  

Kampe Kyle's curator insight, May 28, 2014 10:21 PM

In AP Human Geo., this relates to the concept of land use patterns. As certain countries practice deforestation, slash-and-burn and other land use types, bordering countries may take a completely indifferent approach to the land and thus create a contrast.

Lauren Sellers's curator insight, May 29, 2014 1:11 AM

Photographs show how different countries can be even by just the border. Number 3 really stuck out to me that Haiti doesnt have as many regulation reguarding deforestation as the Dominican Republic and its very noticable.

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Military industrial complex: These 15 countries have the largest defense budgets

Military industrial complex: These 15 countries have the largest defense budgets | Teachers Toolbox | Scoop.it
World defense spending is expected to go up for the first time in five years, thanks to China and Russia.

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Albert Jordan's curator insight, February 12, 2014 5:22 PM

Brazil being in the top 15 of countries with the largest defense budget is not all that surprising considering the political, social, and economic situations of South America. Within Brazil’s sphere of influence, especially areas west of its developed cities, the Amazon jungle still is used by those deemed enemies of the state, whether actual or politically based. Because of that, there comes the difficult task of tracking and deterring rebel activity, arms or drug smuggling, etc. The borders that Brazil share with Bolivia, Colombia, and Venezuela; border security is  likely to be a concern due to the history of drug manufacture and shipping from those nations, along with the violence and corruption that comes with that activity. Not to mention the historical and violent political instability these countries have faced, which are still a concern for the region and world. Venezuela, being an “enemy of the U.S.” and Brazil being an ally, this border area is probably highly militarized or monitored. With this in mind, a slight musing could be given towards how much of the military aid and counter narcotics aid from the United States goes into Brazil’s military funding.

Brazil is also the one of the most stable and economically strong countries on the continent and in order to continue that, the government must be able to keep instability coming over from the border in check as well as deal with rebel forces using the Amazon as a safe haven. What is surprising to me however is that with how far away the rest of the countries in South America are from Brazil in military expenditures causes me to pause and think about just what they may be worrying about from their neighbors? Perhaps as they attempt to get a seat at the big table in international affairs, they feel having a stronger military will improve their image. They may not be worried about regional infighting due to the difficult terrain of the area which would make any military campaign extremely difficult and costly, besides a host of other reasons. In conclusion, Brazil is more than likely looking towards international interests in addition to showcasing their swelling national pride by spending $175 U.S. dollars per person on military expenditures while many continue to go hungry living in the famous favelas of Cidade de Deus.

 

Giovanni Sonego's curator insight, February 13, 2014 7:48 AM

Con 25,2 miliardi di dollari L'Italia si piazza 14esima, prima dell'Iran


Oltre alla spesa complessiva, per i primi 10 paesi è riportato anche l'ammontare di spese militari pro capite.


Stati Uniti 2.000 $

Cina 83 $

Russia 475 $

Arabia Saudita 2.100 $ 

Regno Unito 900 $

Francia 797 $

Giappone, meno di 400 $

Germania 450 $

India 29 $

Brasile 175 $

 
E l'Italia? Basta dividere. Sono 413 $ a persona.

Ogni anno, la mia famiglia dà ben 2.065 $ alla difesa.

Jessica Rieman's curator insight, February 18, 2014 1:32 PM

Russia is the third highest goverment military that spends around 143 million people lived in Russia in 2012 and they spent around $475 per person on it's military. Russia compared to China and the US is another story the US is number one in who spent the most on their military forces at $600.4 billion. As far as China is concerened it comes in at number two at spending around  $112.2 billion. These numbers make sense especially for the power house that China is and how their values of militarism affect their spending and their way of society/life.

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Security Still A Major Concern In Sochi

ESPN Video: Jeremy Schaap details the threats to the 2014 Winter Olympic Games in Sochi, Russia.

Via Seth Dixon
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Jessica Rieman's curator insight, February 18, 2014 2:14 PM

Security is a major concern in Sochi! There have been suicide bombers and many other forms of bomb threats. The athletes are under MAX security and in my opinion need to be because they are in danger because of the way their society is over there and the current issues they have been dealing or not dealing with.

Lauren Stahowiak's curator insight, February 18, 2014 2:57 PM

The Olympics being held in Sochi, Russia concern many across the globe. Located very close to neighboring terrorists, Olympic athletes question whether it is safe to go or not. ESPN discusses the concerns, threats and  increase of security at the games this year. 

Jess Deady's curator insight, April 30, 2014 8:29 PM

The Olympic games only come around every four years. From a spectators point of view, these games are a worldwide phenomenon. Millions of people will be watching them from home and in attendance in Sochi. Threats against HUGE events like these need to be taken seriously. Whether or not they are realistic, with so many lives in potential danger Russia needs to take the threats seriously.

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EU enlargement: The next seven

EU enlargement: The next seven | Teachers Toolbox | Scoop.it
Guide to the countries waiting in the wings to join the European Union club.

Via Chris Scott, Seth Dixon
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Seth Dixon's curator insight, August 12, 2013 10:21 PM

With Croatia joining the EU this summer, many are starting to ask, "who's next?"  This is the guide of countries that have applied for EU membership and that might be joining in the future. 

Treathyl Fox's comment, August 13, 2013 9:45 AM
Excellent! (I hope.) Bottom line is Unity is better than Division. Oh sorry! That's the idealist in me speaking. I better switch over to the cynic. :)
Vincent Springer's comment, September 3, 2013 4:03 PM
A hearty yay for the people of Iceland and the role referendum's play in their democracy. Democracy triumphed over the poor decision making of the Icelandic banks and the (then) government that loosened regulations so they could run amok. Although still reeling from the 2008 meltdown, Iceland is well on its way to recovery and continued prosperity because of the longstanding democratic institutions of its people.
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Redistricting

How can cartography swing an election?  Simple.


Via Seth Dixon
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Donald Dane's comment, December 10, 2013 10:14 AM
this video shows the process from which political candidates win their respective elections. gerrymandering is an illegal use of power in the respect to redistricting and moving town lines in order to pump up voting power. this is an illegal action that happens countless times in elections and taper to higher powers. this gerrymandering idea takes the voter power to elect and puts it into the hands of the actual political personnel. by reshaping you can stack votes into one particular area this way you are guaranteed to win that district. this is where you see districts with these crazy shaped areas rather than nice square or other simple shapes.
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Bizarre Borders


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Alec Castagno's curator insight, October 5, 2014 8:45 PM

This video shows how political geography does not always match up perfectly with physical geography, showing how the "no-touching zone" between the US and Canada has led to several border irregularities. It's very interesting to see how a seemingly straight border on a map is actually an odd and irregular jagged line that defines the political boundary. 

Kristin Mandsager San Bento's curator insight, January 29, 6:31 PM

Craziest thing I've ever seen!  The poor kids on Robert's Island that has to cross through Canada to go to school.  I think it's crazy that the borders were defined when they didn't even have a complete map.  Taking a guess obviously didn't work out.  It seems very difficult to define a border.  

WILBERT DE JESUS's curator insight, February 12, 6:39 PM

Sometimes borders between frendly neighbours like Canada and USA are less protected than borders between countries with conflicts.

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Out of Africa – Did the Colonial Powers ever Really Leave?

Out of Africa – Did the Colonial Powers ever Really Leave? | Teachers Toolbox | Scoop.it
Africa may have achieved independence, but the old colonial ties are still important as France’s decision to send troops to Mali to fight Islamist extremists shows.

Via Seth Dixon
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Nathan Chasse's curator insight, March 25, 2014 12:59 PM

Colonial ties are still very prevalent due to Europe's dependence upon the resources of Africa. European countries like England and France invest billions in Africa, not to help those African nations, but to build infrastructure for resource extraction or to keep governments stable. Though the true exploitation of Africa has ended, the current situation certainly has the ring of exploitation as the people of Europe enjoy the diamonds and chocolate harvested by the multitudes of impoverished people of Africa.

Jess Deady's curator insight, May 4, 2014 4:04 PM

Colony powers are still located within Africa. Just because Africa is technically independent doesn't mean that British Colonial power isn't still in place.

Courtney Barrowman's curator insight, September 11, 2014 2:11 PM

unit 4

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South Sudan: The World’s Newest Country

South Sudan: The World’s Newest Country | Teachers Toolbox | Scoop.it

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Lauren Stahowiak's curator insight, March 17, 2014 5:08 PM

South Sudan recently gained its independence from Sudan. South Sudan is now home to 10-12 million people and is the 193rd member of the United Nations. However, just because South Sudan became independent from Sudan does not mean it does not no longer carry some of the remaining issues.

Nathan Chasse's curator insight, March 25, 2014 1:26 PM

This infographic gives an idea of why South Sudan seceded from the rest of the country. Decades of civil war preceded the secession, and it is clear the cultural differences between the two areas were a contributing factor. South Sudan is a part of the fertile Sahel, with the majority of its people Christian, while Sudan is mostly desert, with the majority of its people Muslims. South Sudan, as a new nation, faces a number of difficulties. Its new government needed to remain stable to focus on nation building, but war has broken out between the government and a rebel faction. South Sudan, should it become stable again, should work to improve the education of its people, as the infographic explains, since the vote to secede needed symbols rather than words due to only 15% of its people being literate.

Jess Deady's curator insight, May 4, 2014 4:05 PM

South Sudan has separated itself two years ago from the rest of Sudan. Its powers have become acknowledged by other countries and its messages to the outside world are ones of peace.

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Op-Ed: Redistricting in Wisconsin

Op-Ed: Redistricting in Wisconsin | Teachers Toolbox | Scoop.it
Shaped like a giant pistol sitting on its butt end, Wisconsin's new 22nd state Senate District is Exhibit A in the case against partisan redistricting.

 

The redistricting process is far from neutral; to be far we should remember that gerrymandering is has happened on all ends of the political spectum.  Which map to you think is the best way to divide these districts?  What is the fairest way to divide them?


Via Seth Dixon
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Seth Dixon's curator insight, July 25, 2013 1:02 PM

The redistricting process is far from neutral; to be fair we should remember that gerrymandering is has happened on all ends of the political spectum.  Which map to you think is the best way to divide these districts?  What is the fairest way to divide them?

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Redistricting Results

Redistricting Results | Teachers Toolbox | Scoop.it

While this cartoon is flippant, the attached Washington Post article is not.  In the culumative congressional voting, Democrats have more votes but won fewer seats than the Republicans.  Many are starting to question the redistricting process after the 2010 census. 

  

Tags: gerrymandering, political, mapping, census.


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Freedom of the Press

Freedom of the Press | Teachers Toolbox | Scoop.it

"Freedom House has been at the forefront in monitoring threats to media independence since 1980. A free press plays a key role in sustaining and monitoring a healthy democracy, as well as in contributing to greater accountability, good government, and economic development. Most importantly, restrictions on media are often an early indicator that governments intend to assault other democratic institutions." 

 

This interactive map shows some intriguing spatial patterns about the freedom of press internationally.  What other patterns to you see in matching up with the most free presses in the world (in green)?  How does a free (or not free press) influence the cultural and political values of a country? 


Via Seth Dixon
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