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Home clings to collapsing cliff in N. Texas

Home clings to collapsing cliff in N. Texas | Teachers Toolbox | Scoop.it

"The edge of the 4,000 square foot residence on Overlook Court was dangling about 75 feet above the rocky shoreline of Lake Whitney after part it it had already broken off."


Via Seth Dixon
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Lorraine Chaffer's curator insight, June 13, 2014 10:00 PM

Natural hazards

YEC Geo's curator insight, June 14, 2014 1:10 PM

In the lower map, the location of the house is marked by a yellow pushpin inside the solid red square.  Some geological background--this poor house has the misfortune to apparently lie directly upon the contact between two carbonate formations (marked by the white dotted line), and to also be on the erosive edge of a bend in the river. Both factors probably contributed to the demise of this particular home, which was eventually set on fire: https://tinyurl.com/nw7mfd2

 

 

One thing to notice is how straight the cliff edge is upon which the house is built.  Knowing that, I'd have to say that if I had a house located on the straight cliff edges within the dotted red squares I've made on the map, I'd be worried.

 

You can read about the geology of Texas here:

https://tinyurl.com/lrcp9yj

 

Image credit here: http://www.nbcdfw.com/news/local/House-on-Lake-Whitney-Cliff-Falling-Into-Lake-262718721.html?partner=nbcnews

Massimo Di Duca's curator insight, June 15, 2014 12:13 PM

E la prospezione geologica da presentare al Comune? Era prevista nel PRG del comune? Esisteva un VIA?

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Largest glacier calving ever filmed

"On May 28, 2008, Adam LeWinter and Director Jeff Orlowski filmed a historic breakup at the Ilulissat Glacier in Western Greenland. The calving event lasted for 75 minutes and the glacier retreated a full mile across a calving face three miles wide. The height of the ice is about 3,000 feet, 300-400 feet above water and the rest below water."

 

Tags: physical, geomorphology, landforms, erosion, climate change, Greenland.


Via Seth Dixon
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More information at www.chasingice.com

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Flaviu Fesnic's comment, April 12, 2014 3:31 PM
impressive !
Maricarmen Husson's curator insight, April 13, 2014 2:15 PM

Adam LeWinter and Director Jeff Orlowski filmed a historic breakup at the Ilulissat Glacier in Western Greenland

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Aerial Photographs Catalogue the Life and Death of Volcanic Islands

Aerial Photographs Catalogue the Life and Death of Volcanic Islands | Teachers Toolbox | Scoop.it

Volcanic islands can seem to appear out of nowhere, emerging from the ocean like breaching monsters of the deep. Below, Mika McKinnon explains how these odd geological formations are born, how they evolve, and how they eventually vanish back beneath the waves.


Via Seth Dixon
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Danielle Lip's curator insight, April 22, 9:59 PM

It is extremely interesting to see how these volcanic islands are creating themselves, this article talks about how these islands are born and why they are being created. Countless eruptions are bringing these islands to above sea level, creating the island basically "below the waves." After each eruption occurs it seems that once the volcano hits the sea floor it starts to build upwards, being not only a volcano island but also a coral reef. Are there other volcanic islands enlarging around the world besides the ones already found? Rock is eventually turned into sand and the volcano underwater becomes dominant and still, where nothing is occurring and the sand begins to pile up, which goes to show how the island is building gradually. The sand can also slip as well as seen in the picture all the way to the right, where parts of the island sink in and the water takes over.

The volcanic islands that have been researched and found are Tahiti, Pinta which is a dry volcanic island, with dark lava flows staining its flanks and lastly is Maupiti whose tip is poking barely 213 meters above the sea.

It is crazy to think that such a geological formation can be created just by the sea alone, it is scary to think of what else could happen to this world, no one really knows and no one really will. I wonder what these volcanic islands will be like in a few years, if the same processes will occur or something new because as we know everything can change at the drop of a dime.

 

WILBERT DE JESUS's curator insight, April 27, 12:56 PM

This pictures show how most islands in the pacific ocean have formed. They rise, erode and then desapear.

Kristin Mandsager San Bento's curator insight, May 4, 12:33 PM

This is an amazing event.  It's crazy how they can be born and die.  Which begs the point, what will happen with Hawaii?  Why do some islands survive?  

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Rivers from Above

Rivers from Above | Teachers Toolbox | Scoop.it
Get a unique view of these rivers beyond the banks.Photo editing by Lia Pepe

Via Seth Dixon
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Woodstock School's curator insight, February 25, 2014 5:01 AM

The Art of Geography

Mark Burgess's curator insight, February 26, 2014 6:26 AM

Awesome rivers. i love a good river.

ok's curator insight, September 23, 2014 5:45 AM

esrdcfvtgbhyjnkmstgyb weiweeee

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Block-Long Sinkhole Swallows Cars in Baltimore

Block-Long Sinkhole Swallows Cars in Baltimore | Teachers Toolbox | Scoop.it

"A block-long sinkhole opened up in a residential neighborhood in rain-soaked Baltimore on Wednesday, devouring cars and forcing the evacuation of several houses."


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Seth Dixon's curator insight, May 1, 2014 4:35 PM

We like to think that the Earth beneath our feet is solid and that the configuration of the landforms in our neighborhood will be unchanging.  This a dramatic reminder that Earth's physical processes don't ever stop--even if we've built a city in that spot.  Watch this retaining wall collapse in this video.


Tags: physical, geomorphology, erosion, landformsweather and climateurban ecology.

Jim Doyle's curator insight, May 9, 2014 10:57 PM
Block-Long Sinkhole Swallows Cars in Baltimore
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Aerial Photographs Catalogue the Life and Death of Volcanic Islands

Aerial Photographs Catalogue the Life and Death of Volcanic Islands | Teachers Toolbox | Scoop.it

Volcanic islands can seem to appear out of nowhere, emerging from the ocean like breaching monsters of the deep. Below, Mika McKinnon explains how these odd geological formations are born, how they evolve, and how they eventually vanish back beneath the waves.


Via Seth Dixon
more...
Danielle Lip's curator insight, April 22, 9:59 PM

It is extremely interesting to see how these volcanic islands are creating themselves, this article talks about how these islands are born and why they are being created. Countless eruptions are bringing these islands to above sea level, creating the island basically "below the waves." After each eruption occurs it seems that once the volcano hits the sea floor it starts to build upwards, being not only a volcano island but also a coral reef. Are there other volcanic islands enlarging around the world besides the ones already found? Rock is eventually turned into sand and the volcano underwater becomes dominant and still, where nothing is occurring and the sand begins to pile up, which goes to show how the island is building gradually. The sand can also slip as well as seen in the picture all the way to the right, where parts of the island sink in and the water takes over.

The volcanic islands that have been researched and found are Tahiti, Pinta which is a dry volcanic island, with dark lava flows staining its flanks and lastly is Maupiti whose tip is poking barely 213 meters above the sea.

It is crazy to think that such a geological formation can be created just by the sea alone, it is scary to think of what else could happen to this world, no one really knows and no one really will. I wonder what these volcanic islands will be like in a few years, if the same processes will occur or something new because as we know everything can change at the drop of a dime.

 

WILBERT DE JESUS's curator insight, April 27, 12:56 PM

This pictures show how most islands in the pacific ocean have formed. They rise, erode and then desapear.

Kristin Mandsager San Bento's curator insight, May 4, 12:33 PM

This is an amazing event.  It's crazy how they can be born and die.  Which begs the point, what will happen with Hawaii?  Why do some islands survive?  

Rescooped by Ms. Harrington from Geography Education
Scoop.it!

Earthquakes in the Classroom

"An 8.2-magnitude earthquake struck off the coast of northern Chile, generating a local tsunami.  The USGS reported the earthquake was centered 95 km (59 miles) northwest of Iquique at a depth of 20.1km (12.5 miles).  This video gives the context for this type of earthquake."  


Via Seth Dixon
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http://www.iris.edu/hq/programs/education_and_outreach/resources

 

Lesson Plans from the Incorporated Research Institutions for Seismology (IRIS)

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Seth Dixon's curator insight, April 2, 2014 11:09 AM

I woke up this morning to news of a large earthquake in Chile (security camera video footage).  IRIS (Incorporated Research Institutions for Seismology) creates teaching resources for teachers who want to use the current events such as yesterday's earthquake in Chile as an opportunity to discuss earth's physical systems and how they impact humanity.  They've produces slides, animations and PDFs for classroom use all while you were sleeping last night.  


Tags: visualization, disasters, physical, Chile.

dilaycock's curator insight, April 3, 2014 2:02 AM

From Seth Dixon: 

 "IRIS(Incorporated Research Institutions for Seismology) creates teaching resources for teachers who want to use the current events such as yesterday's earthquake in Chile as an opportunity to discuss earth's physical systems and how they impact humanity.  They've produces slides, animations and PDFs for classroom use all while you were sleeping last night."  

Geofreak's curator insight, April 3, 2014 1:37 PM

Hoe ontstond deze tsunami precies?

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Unnatural Landscapes

Unnatural Landscapes | Teachers Toolbox | Scoop.it

In a world where photoshop has made the unreal seem ordinary, these unearthly seemingly landscapes might seem likely fakes.  The world can be that extraordinary.  Pictured above is the "Door to Hell" in Turkmenistan.  Rich with natural gas, Soviets were drilling in 1971 when the drilling rig collapsed and left a huge (230 feet wide) hole.  In an attempt to stop gas leaks they hoped a fire would burn off any discharge, but it is still burning today.  Enjoy this gallery of 25 'unnatural' images.   


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Jared Medeiros's curator insight, March 9, 6:52 PM

Some of these pictures are amazing. Im lucky enough to have been able to experience a few of these in my life.  The fire in Turkmenistan is unreal. I cant believe that fire has been burning since 1971. It really does seem like the "Door to Hell".

Louis Mazza's curator insight, March 12, 4:58 PM

Unnatural landscapes. Amongst all the new technology and graphics, the world still holds phenomena’s that can leave any persons jaw dropped. This article on buzzfeed shows 25 images that can amaze you. In Mt. Roraima, Venezuela there is a slab of land that seems to be suspended in the clouds. The Metro in Stockholm, Sweden resembles a space station in the rocks. The tunnel of love in the Ukraine looks like a path carved out of bush and also a romantic place for a date. The tulip Fields in Lisse, Netherlands looks like a grounded rainbow. Lapland, Finland is home to massive natural snow creatures. The mountains of Zhangye, China resembles the colors and look of Zebra stripe gum. Lake Rebta in Senegal looks like your floating in tomato soup.

Kevin Cournoyer's curator insight, May 6, 11:43 AM

Physical geography and landforms are something that have amazed people for millennia. The world's tallest mountains, deepest oceans, widest rivers, and largest deserts have, at various times, astounded, baffled, and hindered human beings. Some physical features are helpful to human progress (cities built on hills are more defensible, rivers allow for irrigation for agriculture) and others delay it (mountains are difficult to traverse, oceans are large and treacherous to navigate). And then there are landforms or geographic features that are just downright strange or unusual, like the ones listed in this article. 

 

While looking at pictures of these places or visiting them may be fun, they also provide us with a valuable lesson about nature. Nature is a force to be reckoned with, as it can produce some pretty amazing and unusual things. People sometimes do not stop to think what nature can do and as a result, suffer the consequences (Napoleon, and later Hitler's ill-fated invasions of Russia, for instance). Geography and natural landforms can be invaluable tools in human progress, but it should also be kept in mind that they are part of nature, and that nature is an unpredictable and sometimes violent force. As with anything, then, nature and geography must be respected and feared to avoid making the same mistakes that others have made in the past.