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Aerial housing photographs show stark division between rich and poor in Mexico

Aerial housing photographs show stark division between rich and poor in Mexico | Teachers Toolbox | Scoop.it
A new advertising campaign is seeking to draw attention to the gap between the wealthy and the poverty-stricken in Mexico by showing how they co-exist in disturbingly close proximity.

Via Seth Dixon
Ms. Harrington's insight:

And again in Brazil

http://civitasinclusive.wordpress.com/2013/03/16/paraisopolis-brazil-by-tuca-vieira-2004/

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Sid McIntyre-DeLaMelena's curator insight, May 29, 2014 12:26 PM

An advertising campaign hopes to show the differences of income and living standards between neighborhoods in Mexico.

The place of these areas are so vastly different as well as there interactions as the lower class makes shanty architecture and the upper class develops large condos and buildings just for residence.

Alec Castagno's curator insight, October 3, 2014 1:21 PM

The pictures show the deep divide between rich and poor in Mexico. These settlements are built to the point where luxurious condos share a wall with decaying slum housing. The roads do not connect the areas, showing how these places were constructed separately by to distinctly different communities. While the proximity between sections shows that sights, sounds, and smells most likely carry across the two sections, the rich area looks as if it has no idea what lies directly beyond their walls. The fact that the rich areas are literally walled off from the rest of the surrounding area says a lot about the deep economic divides found around the world today.

Alyssa Dorr's curator insight, December 16, 2014 9:02 AM

Right away from looking at this picture, you can tell which side is which. I didn't even have to read the article yet to find out where the wealthier people lived and where the not so wealthy lived. The colors stood out the most to me. In the picture on the left, it is clear that this is the not so wealthy part in Mexico. The color is just filled with dark and gloominess, mostly shown in gray. The houses are also pushed very closely together. On the right side, it appears that this is the richer side of Mexico. Although the houses are closer together like the picture on the left, they are colorful. They have firm built roofs and appear to be built and taken care of much better. Something else that gives you the sense of which community is more rich is the cars. There is a whole line of cars in the right picture while in the left picture we see a few here and there. The right picture also illustrates lawns. We slightly see some grass in the left, but it is clearly not as well taken care of as the lawns in the right picture. This picture was done as an advertisement to draw attention to the gap between the two different communities. The campaign goes by the name "Erase the Differences" and hopes to get people to realize the differences in poverty that are right in front of them.

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The Geography of Small Talk

The Geography of Small Talk | Teachers Toolbox | Scoop.it
Surprising alternatives to "so what do you do?"—from New Orleans to New York.

Via Seth Dixon
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Seth Dixon's curator insight, April 23, 2014 7:48 PM

The types of questions that you ask when you are meeting someone new for the first time has some regional variations but there is much more to the geography of small talk than that as see in this 4 minute video.  People want to understand your cultural, ethnic, socioeconomic context by asking spatial questions about where you are from.  Identity and place are tightly woven and these neighborhood questions are almost invitations to share much more personal information, as if to ask, "how do you fit in this world?"  When you are being introduced to someone, what are the questions that you ask, and what type of information are you hoping to get?  Each person has their own little geography that has profoundly shaped who they are---so what’s your story? 


Tags: language, regions, folk cultures, communityplace, neighborhood.

Courtney Barrowman's curator insight, April 24, 2014 9:43 AM

unit 2-3

Mr Steven Newman's curator insight, April 24, 2014 2:33 PM
Love this scoop from Seth Dixon. A nice way to help kids understand sense of place .
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In Pictures: Crackdown in Brazil's favelas

In Pictures: Crackdown in Brazil's favelas | Teachers Toolbox | Scoop.it
The Brazilian government's 'pacification' initiative has led to drug busts and shootouts in Rio's favelas.

 

Just a few months before Rio de Janeiro welcomes visitors for the World Cup, and two years before it hosts the Olympics, security within the city remains a major issue.  The government currently promotes the policy of "pacification", where security forces engage in raids, drug busts, and even gunfights with suspected gang members. This pacification policy is supposed to pave the way for the development of long-neglected favelas in Rio, Brazil's second-biggest city and home to 11 million people.  However, many of the favelas remain in the hands of an army of drug dealers and criminals who are not willing to step down or be pacified.


Via Seth Dixon
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Seth Dixon's curator insight, April 2, 2014 9:30 PM

Tags: Brazil, urban, squatter, narcotics, socioeconomic, neighborhood.

Courtney Barrowman's curator insight, April 28, 2014 10:41 AM

unit 7

Mark Hathaway's curator insight, October 1, 2015 6:29 AM

I believe that absolutely no one is surprised that right before an international event, the hosting city is cracking down on its problem areas. I am skeptical of the Brazilin governments  promise to develop the long neglected Favelas. After Rio finishes hosting the 2016 Summer games, the government will once again neglect the Favelas. There will no longer be an incentive for the government to care about the favelas. The eyes of the world will be off the  city and things can return to normal. The only losers in this equation are the actual residents of these slums. Once again the promise of better days will ripped  from them. An added injury is that there informal economy will have been destroyed. While life in an informal economy is hard by any measure, it is still a way of making a living. The increased police presence will destroy that way of life and replace it with empty promises.  

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The Mystery House

"In Raleigh, N.C., there's a house... or what looks like a house. What's hidden inside is more important than most people realize. Read the story: http://wunc.org/post/video-whats-inside-house-wade-avenue "


Via Seth Dixon
Ms. Harrington's insight:

A great introduction to city planning

 

http://www.npr.org/blogs/thetwo-way/2014/01/17/263476645/whats-inside-this-mystery-house-in-north-carolina

 

 

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Joseph Thacker 's curator insight, January 24, 2014 2:41 PM

That house on Wade Avenue appears to be your average home that a person would not look twice at. I am sure the people who are driving by this property everyday do not know that this is a water booster pump station. This is a clever and thoughtful idea by the government to think about the people living in this neighborhood, as they designed what could be a very non-appealing piece of property, into a secure and attractive water booster pump station. 

Lauren Stahowiak's curator insight, January 27, 2014 4:11 PM

This short YouTube clip focuses on the Governments creative ways of keeping city planning out of the eyes of everyday people. Not only do these creative ways allow cities to remain unvandalised, but they also eliminate the eye sores of waterplants and towers. I think these ideas are great and allow communities to remain beautiful and inviting. 

Tracy Galvin's comment, January 30, 2014 3:00 PM
This is a really nice example of a respect for the neighborhood. By disguising the building it doesn't create an eyesore in the community but will allow the plant to provide a service to the neighbors. This keeps property values high and the neighbors happy.
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The Geography of Small Talk

The Geography of Small Talk | Teachers Toolbox | Scoop.it
Surprising alternatives to "so what do you do?"—from New Orleans to New York.

Via Seth Dixon
more...
Seth Dixon's curator insight, April 23, 2014 7:48 PM

The types of questions that you ask when you are meeting someone new for the first time has some regional variations but there is much more to the geography of small talk than that as see in this 4 minute video.  People want to understand your cultural, ethnic, socioeconomic context by asking spatial questions about where you are from.  Identity and place are tightly woven and these neighborhood questions are almost invitations to share much more personal information, as if to ask, "how do you fit in this world?"  When you are being introduced to someone, what are the questions that you ask, and what type of information are you hoping to get?  Each person has their own little geography that has profoundly shaped who they are---so what’s your story? 


Tags: language, regions, folk cultures, communityplace, neighborhood.

Courtney Barrowman's curator insight, April 24, 2014 9:43 AM

unit 2-3

Mr Steven Newman's curator insight, April 24, 2014 2:33 PM
Love this scoop from Seth Dixon. A nice way to help kids understand sense of place .
Rescooped by Ms. Harrington from Geography Education
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New York City's Disappearing Mom-and-Pop Storefronts

New York City's Disappearing Mom-and-Pop Storefronts | Teachers Toolbox | Scoop.it
Two photographers set out to see what happened to small family businesses in New York City in a decade

Via Seth Dixon
Ms. Harrington's insight:

What a decade can do to a cultural landscape.

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Heidi Ames's curator insight, April 10, 2014 10:49 AM

Awesome to use when studying the Northeast and Immigration.  How scenes change in a short time due to economy!

L.Long's curator insight, April 15, 2014 6:55 PM

Changing nature of world cities

Jake Reardon's curator insight, April 21, 2014 5:49 PM

To be honest I am surprised that "Mom and Pop" storefronts lasted this long in New York City. It just seems to me that as a city grows and rent prices go up the smaller store fronts would naturally be pushed out by larger conglomerates who would be more suited to handle the rent prices. Of course it is an old addeage of capitalism that as long as you offer a good product that consumers would be inclined to consume you can stay above water in even the most competitive locations. Although to me that would appear to have its limits. Perhaps the economic tides of the present in New York are that limit.

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The Case for Cul-de-Sacs

The Case for Cul-de-Sacs | Teachers Toolbox | Scoop.it
People who live in them actually have greater social cohesion, according to one sociologist.

 

Thomas R. Hochschild Jr. actually first encountered the social cohesion of cul-de-sacs in his latest research when he wandered into one in Connecticut with his clipboard and polo shirt, and someone called the cops.  That never happened on the other types of streets he was studying, places where it would turn out the neighbors didn't know each other as well, and it was less clear who "belonged." Repeatedly, though, he found at the end of cul-de-sacs families who watched each others' children and took in each others' mail, who barbequed and orchestrated the removal of snow together, and who considered each other close friends. In cul-de-sacs, these families had a stronger sense of shared social space and territoriality. An outsider stood out.


Via Seth Dixon
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Alison D. Gilbert's curator insight, February 23, 2014 8:33 PM

Living in a cul-de-sac sounds very inviting.

Joseph Thacker 's curator insight, February 24, 2014 1:32 PM

I lived in a col-de-sac for a number of years. My family and I had very close relationships with our two neighbors within our col-de-sac. We had parties together and helped each other out in times of need - this article is spot on.  

Matt Richardson's curator insight, February 25, 2014 10:13 AM

Interesting article about suburban design.