Teachers Toolbox
Follow
Find tag "language"
231 views | +0 today
Teachers Toolbox
History and American Government Resources
Curated by Ms. Harrington
Your new post is loading...
Your new post is loading...
Rescooped by Ms. Harrington from Geography Education
Scoop.it!

The Geography of Language

"Over the course of human history, thousands of languages have developed from what was once a much smaller number. How did we end up with so many? And how do we keep track of them all? Alex Gendler explains how linguists group languages into language families, demonstrating how these linguistic trees give us crucial insights into the past."


Via Seth Dixon
more...
Catherine Smyth's curator insight, June 2, 7:45 PM

Not really primary geography but so interesting!

Woodstock School's curator insight, June 4, 6:05 AM

A good teaching tool for explaining the diversity of languages.

Adilson Camacho's curator insight, June 12, 9:38 PM

Geografia Cultural

Rescooped by Ms. Harrington from Geography Education
Scoop.it!

The Geography of Small Talk

The Geography of Small Talk | Teachers Toolbox | Scoop.it
Surprising alternatives to "so what do you do?"—from New Orleans to New York.

Via Seth Dixon
more...
Seth Dixon's curator insight, April 23, 7:48 PM

The types of questions that you ask when you are meeting someone new for the first time has some regional variations but there is much more to the geography of small talk than that as see in this 4 minute video.  People want to understand your cultural, ethnic, socioeconomic context by asking spatial questions about where you are from.  Identity and place are tightly woven and these neighborhood questions are almost invitations to share much more personal information, as if to ask, "how do you fit in this world?"  When you are being introduced to someone, what are the questions that you ask, and what type of information are you hoping to get?  Each person has their own little geography that has profoundly shaped who they are---so what’s your story? 


Tags: language, regions, folk cultures, communityplace, neighborhood.

Courtney Barrowman's curator insight, April 24, 9:43 AM

unit 2-3

Mr Steven Newman's curator insight, April 24, 2:33 PM
Love this scoop from Seth Dixon. A nice way to help kids understand sense of place .
Rescooped by Ms. Harrington from Geography Education
Scoop.it!

A tour of the British Isles in accents

Got the audio here - http://www.bbc.co.uk/programmes/p01slnp5 The person doing the voice is Andrew Jack who is a dialect coach.

 

Tags: language, culture, English, UK.


Via Seth Dixon
more...
Sascha Humphrey's curator insight, April 6, 4:33 AM

He's really quite good, and the seamless change of dialect is quite impressive!

Michael MacNeil's curator insight, April 6, 11:32 AM

The diversity of the English language is amazing.  Even in the "motherland" it changes from location to location...aye bay goom.

Melissa Marshall's curator insight, April 9, 10:19 PM

This is a really interesting video for understanding regional dialect differences!

Rescooped by Ms. Harrington from Geography Education
Scoop.it!

Does English still borrow words from other languages?

Does English still borrow words from other languages? | Teachers Toolbox | Scoop.it

"English language has 'borrowed' words for centuries. But is it now lending more than it's taking, asks Philip Durkin, deputy chief editor of the Oxford English Dictionary. "

 

Knowledge of what is being borrowed, and from where, provides an invaluable insight into the international relations of the English language.  Today English borrows words from other languages with a truly global reach.


Via Seth Dixon
more...
Pranav Pradeep's curator insight, February 6, 3:20 PM

English is still a language that is made off of other languages, not many if any of our words were not atleast based off of someother language!

Rescooped by Ms. Harrington from Geography Education
Scoop.it!

The Names Behind The States

The Names Behind The States | Teachers Toolbox | Scoop.it

An infographic of the etymology and cultural origins of the names that made the United States of America.


Via Seth Dixon
more...
Seth Dixon's comment, May 6, 2013 3:21 PM
@Carly, Texas is also inaccurate...
Francisco Javier 's curator insight, May 12, 2013 8:52 PM

The Names Behind The States | @scoopit via @APHumanGeog http://sco.lt/...

Aulde de Barbuat's comment, May 18, 2013 7:08 AM
quite interesting, thanks. Unhappily, the link seems broken..Do you happen to have another one?
Rescooped by Ms. Harrington from Geography Education
Scoop.it!

Out of Africa – Did the Colonial Powers ever Really Leave?

Out of Africa – Did the Colonial Powers ever Really Leave? | Teachers Toolbox | Scoop.it
Africa may have achieved independence, but the old colonial ties are still important as France’s decision to send troops to Mali to fight Islamist extremists shows.

Via Seth Dixon
more...
Elizabeth Bitgood's curator insight, March 19, 10:27 AM

This infographic was very interesting.  By using color coding it highlights the areas of influence the colonel powers still maintain over their old possessions.  This map is helpful in understanding how this affects the politics of theses regions today.

Nathan Chasse's curator insight, March 25, 12:59 PM

Colonial ties are still very prevalent due to Europe's dependence upon the resources of Africa. European countries like England and France invest billions in Africa, not to help those African nations, but to build infrastructure for resource extraction or to keep governments stable. Though the true exploitation of Africa has ended, the current situation certainly has the ring of exploitation as the people of Europe enjoy the diamonds and chocolate harvested by the multitudes of impoverished people of Africa.

Jess Deady's curator insight, May 4, 4:04 PM

Colony powers are still located within Africa. Just because Africa is technically independent doesn't mean that British Colonial power isn't still in place.

Rescooped by Ms. Harrington from Geography Education
Scoop.it!

The Geography of Small Talk

The Geography of Small Talk | Teachers Toolbox | Scoop.it
Surprising alternatives to "so what do you do?"—from New Orleans to New York.

Via Seth Dixon
more...
Seth Dixon's curator insight, April 23, 7:48 PM

The types of questions that you ask when you are meeting someone new for the first time has some regional variations but there is much more to the geography of small talk than that as see in this 4 minute video.  People want to understand your cultural, ethnic, socioeconomic context by asking spatial questions about where you are from.  Identity and place are tightly woven and these neighborhood questions are almost invitations to share much more personal information, as if to ask, "how do you fit in this world?"  When you are being introduced to someone, what are the questions that you ask, and what type of information are you hoping to get?  Each person has their own little geography that has profoundly shaped who they are---so what’s your story? 


Tags: language, regions, folk cultures, communityplace, neighborhood.

Courtney Barrowman's curator insight, April 24, 9:43 AM

unit 2-3

Mr Steven Newman's curator insight, April 24, 2:33 PM
Love this scoop from Seth Dixon. A nice way to help kids understand sense of place .
Scooped by Ms. Harrington
Scoop.it!

WATCH: Yup, The English Language Is Insane

WATCH: Yup, The English Language Is Insane | Teachers Toolbox | Scoop.it
Seriously, what is with the English language? Why is the plural of box boxes, but the plural of ox oxen? It makes no sense, people!

ASAP Thought's poem "English is Crazy" helps us break down all the ways English is well, insane. Grammar...
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Ms. Harrington
Scoop.it!

Americans Speak English Totally Differently From Each Other…

Americans Speak English Totally Differently From Each Other… | Teachers Toolbox | Scoop.it

Great visual for the geography of language in the United States

 

Ms. Harrington's insight:

Great visual for the geography of language in the United States

more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Ms. Harrington from Geography Education
Scoop.it!

American English Dialects

American English Dialects | Teachers Toolbox | Scoop.it

There are 8 major English dialect areas in North America, presented on the map. These are shown in blue, each with its number, on the map and in the Dialect Description Chart below, and are also outlined with blue lines on the map.  The many subdialects are shown in red on the map and in the chart, and are outlined with red lines on the map. All of these are listed in the margins of the map as well.


Via Seth Dixon
Ms. Harrington's insight:

Very cool map with links to video/audio of the local dialect.

more...
Susan Lindell Radke's comment, May 16, 2013 4:26 PM
Looks like the YouTube links don't work. YT account terminated?
Fotografie Turismo Italia's comment, May 17, 2013 5:07 AM
I don't know this problem, sorry.
Leslie Creath's curator insight, May 27, 2013 1:41 PM

This is fascinating to me

Rescooped by Ms. Harrington from Mr. D's AP US History
Scoop.it!

Out of Africa – Did the Colonial Powers ever Really Leave?

Out of Africa – Did the Colonial Powers ever Really Leave? | Teachers Toolbox | Scoop.it
Africa may have achieved independence, but the old colonial ties are still important as France’s decision to send troops to Mali to fight Islamist extremists shows.

Via Seth Dixon, AP US History
more...
Elizabeth Bitgood's curator insight, March 19, 10:27 AM

This infographic was very interesting.  By using color coding it highlights the areas of influence the colonel powers still maintain over their old possessions.  This map is helpful in understanding how this affects the politics of theses regions today.

Nathan Chasse's curator insight, March 25, 12:59 PM

Colonial ties are still very prevalent due to Europe's dependence upon the resources of Africa. European countries like England and France invest billions in Africa, not to help those African nations, but to build infrastructure for resource extraction or to keep governments stable. Though the true exploitation of Africa has ended, the current situation certainly has the ring of exploitation as the people of Europe enjoy the diamonds and chocolate harvested by the multitudes of impoverished people of Africa.

Jess Deady's curator insight, May 4, 4:04 PM

Colony powers are still located within Africa. Just because Africa is technically independent doesn't mean that British Colonial power isn't still in place.

Rescooped by Ms. Harrington from Geography Education
Scoop.it!

When Did Americans Lose Their British Accents?

When Did Americans Lose Their British Accents? | Teachers Toolbox | Scoop.it
Readers Nick and Riela have both written to ask how and when English colonists in America lost their British accents and how American accents came

Via Seth Dixon
more...
Jess Pitrone's comment, April 29, 2013 9:06 PM
I think that language and accents are part of what defines a region. Although it isn’t a physical geographical characteristic, an accent can help you to identify where you are in the world, or within a particular nation. As Americans, we hear British accents as something completely different then our own, but in reality, they aren’t that different. As the article says, even though there are distinct General American accents and the BBC English accent, there are still parts of Great Britain and part of the US that share the rhotic and non-rhotic accents.
Accents are part of the culture that defines a geographical area. I would say that accent can be both a over-arching part of culture, like, for example, the General American accent that defines the whole nation culturally, or a small part of regional culture, like, for example, the specific Boston accent.
John Peterson's comment, April 30, 2013 10:38 AM
This article brings up an interesting point on how accents within a given language can be hard to determine, and they can change drastically over time for no apparent reason. In colonial times, because most colonial settlers were English, they would obviously have similar accents to those of the British. While this is the case, over time with exposure to their own practices as well as other societies and their accents, they may have begun to slowly form their own accents. While it is obvious that “American” and “British” accents are inherently different, this was not always so. What caused this shift and when did it occur? It is hard to say, especially with how accents have continued to develop even within the classification of American or British accents. It is hard to determine what is a truly American or British accent because of the numerous regional accents that are present in today’s society. As a result, it is even more difficult to determine when the initial change in accents occurred in our past.
Max Krishchuk's comment, April 30, 2013 10:47 AM
This is a great question because no one has really dwelled on the question. I like that the people talked about the rhotacism aspect of it because I had never known that before. This is very important because that is the exact way that the British and American languages are different. I think that it is very important to understand this subject because it shows the exact way that we speak differently from British people. I like that the people who discussed the question talked about the history that is involved, or the lack of the history that is involved. The people who truly want to study this question have to read books on this subject because it seems like there is not that much information on it. American speech sounds more modern and middle class to me, while the British language sounds like it is for the upper class.