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Europe’s Landscape Is Still Scarred by World War I

Europe’s Landscape Is Still Scarred by World War I | Teachers Toolbox | Scoop.it
Photographs of the abandoned battlefields reveal the trenches’ scars still run deep

Via Seth Dixon
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Alyssa Dorr's curator insight, December 17, 2014 11:19 AM

Europe's landscape is still scared by World War I. Many photographs are shown in this article of abandoned battlefields that reveal the trenches scars. It has been at least a century since the Great War, yet the country is still buried with scars. In this image by Irish landscape photographer Michael St. Maur Sheil, you can trace grass-covered trenches and pockmarks from exploded bombshells. Millions of men were injured or even killed right in this very spot, which was the first major British offensive of the war. Artists take these photographs to document the legacy that was left on that battlefield. Sheil was very famous for photographs such as these. He includes seventy-nine contemporary photographs of World War I battlefields and has them on display in Paris along the wrought-iron fence of Luxembourg Gardens.

Jacob Conklin's curator insight, February 12, 2015 6:57 PM

People often forget that the world doesn't reset after a major war. World War I was one of the most destructive wars in Europe's long history, not only in terms of human casualties, but also in terms of physical destruction. The heavy use of trench warfare left an everlasting mark on the landscape. Soldiers dug trenches that were miles long and use them for protection from enemy fire. Any observer can see that bullets do not turn corners and that a soldier can hide within the trench and be impervious to gunfire. There is one major weakness in this tactic that explains the dips in the landscape surrounding the trenches. In order to reach the enemy soldiers, bomb and mortar attacks were very effective. The everlasting geographical scaring of the land tells the history of what took place in an area, from wars in Europe to glacial movement in Alaska. The landscape never forgets.

Brian Wilk's curator insight, March 28, 2015 10:11 AM

This particular landscape shows trenches and the remains of bombed out fields where one million British soldiers where either killed or wounded by the Germans. I cannot fathom the heartache and loss that these families must have experienced and in some cases still are. How many future leaders or scientists or Nobel Peace Prize winners were killed here? How might the world be a better place but for the butchering of these soldiers? Multiply that though by the hundreds of wars fought throughout civilization. We could be so far advanced as a society, instead we chose and continue to choose wars that contain costs we can't even quantify. I'd like to see cancer cells being destroyed, not people, housing being built instead of propaganda, education instead of anarchy. No more scars, let's build beautiful monuments to society, like peace.

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What is halal meat?

What is halal meat? | Teachers Toolbox | Scoop.it

"There have been calls for clearer labelling of halal products in shops, restaurants and takeaways. But what is halal food? And why are campaigners so concerned?"


Via Seth Dixon
Ms. Harrington's insight:

Halal means permissible, the opposite of Haram  which means forbidden or illegal. 


Halal meat means that has been prepared in accordance with Islamic traditions and is therefore permissible for an observant Muslim to eat (very similar to Kosher for Jewish people). 


Within the European Union more Muslims are migrating to Europe.  Some Europeans, however, feel that the Halal labeling and marketing is a change to the cultural landscape that they are not comfortable with, and don't want to see it become more mainstream.  Other meat companies try to present their products as Halal, but don't adhere to all of the customs according to some more strict Muslims.  Halal, then is a lightning rod, in either direction right now in Europe. - From Seth Dixon

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Seth Dixon's curator insight, May 8, 2014 3:47 PM

I know just enough Arabic to read the word Halal (حلال) and know that it means permissible, the opposite of Haram (حَرَام‎) which means forbidden or illegal.  In the context of meat, it means meat that has been prepared in accordance with Islamic traditions and is therefore permissible for an observant Muslim to eat (very similar to Kosher for Jewish people).  Today, Halal is becoming an important issue within the European Union for two main reasons: 1) more Muslims are migrating to Europe and 2) Europeans are searching for less artificial food products.  Some Europeans, however, feel that the Halal labeling and marketing is a change to the cultural landscape that they are not comfortable with, and don't want to see it become more mainstream.  Other meat companies try to present their products as Halal, but don't adhere to all of the customs according to some more strict Muslims.  Halal, then is a lightning rod, in either direction right now in Europe.  If you want to see the inner workings of a Halal slaughterhouse in New York, this video will show you what it is like.   

Kendra King's curator insight, February 27, 2015 12:07 AM

 

I am not surprised some European governments aren’t taking a stronger stance, but I think the market might sort itself out in this instance. This issue is another battle of a minority group trying to keep their culture in a different country. Muslims, who are typically discriminated against in Europe, would like there to be more clear labeling, along with Jews (another minority). As mentioned in the article, most countries (excluding Denmark) allow suppliers to kill without stunning for religious purposes, but  buyers are having trouble identifying the meat they can eat provided by these suppliers since most Europeans don't need to know this information. The author pointed out that the economic trend is showing that Muslims have enough of a "spending power" that the slaughterhouses will want to respond to their needs in order to profit. It would be nice for the government to step in, but I really doubt that will happen given how this group is typically marginalized. So in this instance, the Muslims are lucky that money motivates.  

 

Overall, I sympathize with the Muslim's desire to want more labeling even though I don't agree with it. The reason I am against eating meat rests largely with how the animals are treated from their time on the farm being raised to the time they are slaughtered. I myself wish their was more information in regards to this so I could eat meat in good conscious. Killing without stunning isn’t the most humane, but that is what  these people's conscience need due to their religion. So denying or harshly judging this desire would just be plain hypocritical of me. Therefore, I hope the economy can actually take care of itself.  

 

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Seeing Landmarks From Far Away Might Shatter Your Perception Of Them

Seeing Landmarks From Far Away Might Shatter Your Perception Of Them | Teachers Toolbox | Scoop.it
Wow. I guess it's true when they say not everything is as it appears...

Via Seth Dixon
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Kristen McDaniel's curator insight, March 21, 2014 11:34 AM

I think it's awesome to see the past mixed with the present, and realizing how our imagination adds to the "mystery" of places.  However, seeing things in context truly changes perception - how could this be brought to your students?  Fascinating.  

Maricarmen Husson's curator insight, March 28, 2014 11:43 AM

LA PERCEPCIÓN A TRAVÉS DE LA DISTANCIA

Jessica Rieman's curator insight, April 2, 2014 5:33 PM

By looking at these images it is apparent that heir is a clear distincition between how one may view the monument from upclose andd then when you take asep back you can really appreciate it by seeing others appreciate it as well. As an observer you can also identify the different persepectives by looking at it in a different light by either taking a step back or viewing it from a different vanage point. Knowing the history of the monument also helps with a background story in order for better appreciation of the monument and the History that goes along with it.

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Unnatural Landscapes

Unnatural Landscapes | Teachers Toolbox | Scoop.it

In a world where photoshop has made the unreal seem ordinary, these unearthly seemingly landscapes might seem likely fakes.  The world can be that extraordinary.  Pictured above is the "Door to Hell" in Turkmenistan.  Rich with natural gas, Soviets were drilling in 1971 when the drilling rig collapsed and left a huge (230 feet wide) hole.  In an attempt to stop gas leaks they hoped a fire would burn off any discharge, but it is still burning today.  Enjoy this gallery of 25 'unnatural' images.   


Via Seth Dixon
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Louis Mazza's curator insight, March 12, 2015 4:58 PM

Unnatural landscapes. Amongst all the new technology and graphics, the world still holds phenomena’s that can leave any persons jaw dropped. This article on buzzfeed shows 25 images that can amaze you. In Mt. Roraima, Venezuela there is a slab of land that seems to be suspended in the clouds. The Metro in Stockholm, Sweden resembles a space station in the rocks. The tunnel of love in the Ukraine looks like a path carved out of bush and also a romantic place for a date. The tulip Fields in Lisse, Netherlands looks like a grounded rainbow. Lapland, Finland is home to massive natural snow creatures. The mountains of Zhangye, China resembles the colors and look of Zebra stripe gum. Lake Rebta in Senegal looks like your floating in tomato soup.

Kevin Cournoyer's curator insight, May 6, 2015 11:43 AM

Physical geography and landforms are something that have amazed people for millennia. The world's tallest mountains, deepest oceans, widest rivers, and largest deserts have, at various times, astounded, baffled, and hindered human beings. Some physical features are helpful to human progress (cities built on hills are more defensible, rivers allow for irrigation for agriculture) and others delay it (mountains are difficult to traverse, oceans are large and treacherous to navigate). And then there are landforms or geographic features that are just downright strange or unusual, like the ones listed in this article. 

 

While looking at pictures of these places or visiting them may be fun, they also provide us with a valuable lesson about nature. Nature is a force to be reckoned with, as it can produce some pretty amazing and unusual things. People sometimes do not stop to think what nature can do and as a result, suffer the consequences (Napoleon, and later Hitler's ill-fated invasions of Russia, for instance). Geography and natural landforms can be invaluable tools in human progress, but it should also be kept in mind that they are part of nature, and that nature is an unpredictable and sometimes violent force. As with anything, then, nature and geography must be respected and feared to avoid making the same mistakes that others have made in the past. 

Nicholas A. Whitmore's curator insight, December 17, 2015 11:34 AM

Another interesting failure of the Soviets during the Cold War. One really begins to question their competence when reading about this, Chernobyl and the Aral Sea. I honestly don't see how anyone would consider lighting a major gas leak on fire would help the situation either. Regardless this site stands as a testament to the influence we have on the geography of area through our reshaping for society. The incident also now helps Turkmenistan economically because it offers tourist attraction revenue. Additionally while the gallery had many fascinating images from around the world this one captivated me due to its historical nature and affect it would have had on the region. Hopefully the site doesn't ever become too dangerous do to the flammable substances because I would imagine that is a possibility (also hopefully there is not too much environmental damage from it either).

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Alluvial Fans

Alluvial Fans | Teachers Toolbox | Scoop.it
When streams emerge from mountains, they often spread out and deposit sediment in a distinctive pattern known as an alluvial fan.

Via Seth Dixon
Ms. Harrington's insight:

In dry areas of interior drainage the human settlements are often clustered along the foothills of the mountains near landforms called alluvial fans. 


Alluvial fans and the agricultural patterns that people create on them, show how human settlements are highly dependent of the physical environment.  

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Gene Gagne's curator insight, November 18, 2015 3:27 PM

These fans are like a good Delta. People live between the mountains and the desert. Water runs down the mountains making a fan to where now a little distance away farms are produced and good vegetation.

Benjamin Jackson's curator insight, December 14, 2015 11:29 AM

these are the fascinating geographic anomalies. its amazing the civilizations that rise up on earth, but are totally alien to us, even in the age of instant communication.

Nicholas A. Whitmore's curator insight, December 17, 2015 12:02 PM

An interesting little piece of Kazakhstan geography here. I find it fascinating that not only are these unique to deserts due to low vegetation but that they become perfect for agriculture (an irony of sorts I suppose). I also rather enjoy how the agricultural areas are spread out like a fan like the water runoff from the mountain. One key feature I didn't notice until I read it was the railroad that goes right through the fields to reach the town on the outskirts of the Alluvial fan. I am particularly curious to how many areas actually use this to make the desert a hospitable place for habitation (since it is usually a bad idea due to lack of water and food). It would also have been more interesting if the culture of the people who inhabit these places was discussed since it would likely be different in other places since they are only relying on 1 main water source. Geographically and historically I can imagine that places like this would have also been key strategic locations especially when traversing the arid areas.

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New York City's Disappearing Mom-and-Pop Storefronts

New York City's Disappearing Mom-and-Pop Storefronts | Teachers Toolbox | Scoop.it
Two photographers set out to see what happened to small family businesses in New York City in a decade

Via Seth Dixon
Ms. Harrington's insight:

What a decade can do to a cultural landscape.

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Heidi Ames's curator insight, April 10, 2014 10:49 AM

Awesome to use when studying the Northeast and Immigration.  How scenes change in a short time due to economy!

L.Long's curator insight, April 15, 2014 6:55 PM

Changing nature of world cities

Jake Reardon's curator insight, April 21, 2014 5:49 PM

To be honest I am surprised that "Mom and Pop" storefronts lasted this long in New York City. It just seems to me that as a city grows and rent prices go up the smaller store fronts would naturally be pushed out by larger conglomerates who would be more suited to handle the rent prices. Of course it is an old addeage of capitalism that as long as you offer a good product that consumers would be inclined to consume you can stay above water in even the most competitive locations. Although to me that would appear to have its limits. Perhaps the economic tides of the present in New York are that limit.

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Places in their Proper Perspectives

Places in their Proper Perspectives | Teachers Toolbox | Scoop.it

"A fisherman's cottage is described by real estate agents as a 'property not to be missed' but it is also just yards away from two nuclear power stations."


Via Seth Dixon
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Adilson Camacho's curator insight, January 31, 2014 6:19 PM

Versões...

Fern Torres's curator insight, February 3, 2014 4:11 PM

Perception is everything!

Jess Deady's curator insight, April 16, 2014 1:35 PM

This house is 100% misleading. The paper advertised the first picture, which from the looks of it isn't so bad. Then when you get the reverse picture and see the nuclear power plants behind it, its a whole new scene! Whoever is trying to sell this house- good luck to you. Who wants to live next to something that could literally kill god knows what? Not me. 

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Ghosts of War

Ghosts of War | Teachers Toolbox | Scoop.it
The remarkable pictures show scenes from France today with atmospheric photographs taken in the same place during the war superimposed on top.

 

In this fastinating set of images, Dutch artist and historian Jo Teeuwisse merges her passions literally by superimposing World War II photographs on to modern pictures of the where the photos were originally taken.  This serves as a reminder that places are rich with history; to understand the geography of a place, one must also know it's history (and vice versa).   

 

Tags: Europe, war, images, historial, place. 


Via Seth Dixon
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Cam E's curator insight, February 27, 2014 11:26 AM

I'm not even sure what to say about this set of pictures exactly, except that they're a very cool way to see history. I'm interesting in Social Studies and history because I'm captivated by seeing the world framed in a story, and these images do just that. To see the same places where the war was fought and what has changed is great, but these photos also give the impression of some stories of war. The idea of them being "ghosts" gives the impression of something left behind which marks the land even to this day.

Samuel D'Amore's curator insight, September 10, 2014 2:56 PM

Very interesting, I've seen similar things done with Russian cities and parts of the Ukaranian country side.

Wilmine Merlain's curator insight, December 18, 2014 2:47 PM

This Dutch historian does a great job at interweaving places that were ridden by the second world war to its modern reconstruct. As a child, I use to question a lot what a place looked like prior to it being destroyed. In the context of Europe a continent, ridden by war, the historian not only does a great job at depicting past and present, her photographs also show how the country's government went to great lengths to preserve some of its land's historic sites.