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Home clings to collapsing cliff in N. Texas

Home clings to collapsing cliff in N. Texas | Teachers Toolbox | Scoop.it

"The edge of the 4,000 square foot residence on Overlook Court was dangling about 75 feet above the rocky shoreline of Lake Whitney after part it it had already broken off."


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Lorraine Chaffer's curator insight, June 13, 7:00 PM

Natural hazards

YEC Geo's curator insight, June 14, 10:10 AM

In the lower map, the location of the house is marked by a yellow pushpin inside the solid red square.  Some geological background--this poor house has the misfortune to apparently lie directly upon the contact between two carbonate formations (marked by the white dotted line), and to also be on the erosive edge of a bend in the river. Both factors probably contributed to the demise of this particular home, which was eventually set on fire: https://tinyurl.com/nw7mfd2

 

 

One thing to notice is how straight the cliff edge is upon which the house is built.  Knowing that, I'd have to say that if I had a house located on the straight cliff edges within the dotted red squares I've made on the map, I'd be worried.

 

You can read about the geology of Texas here:

https://tinyurl.com/lrcp9yj

 

Image credit here: http://www.nbcdfw.com/news/local/House-on-Lake-Whitney-Cliff-Falling-Into-Lake-262718721.html?partner=nbcnews

Massimo Di Duca's curator insight, June 15, 9:13 AM

E la prospezione geologica da presentare al Comune? Era prevista nel PRG del comune? Esisteva un VIA?

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Aerial housing photographs show stark division between rich and poor in Mexico

Aerial housing photographs show stark division between rich and poor in Mexico | Teachers Toolbox | Scoop.it
A new advertising campaign is seeking to draw attention to the gap between the wealthy and the poverty-stricken in Mexico by showing how they co-exist in disturbingly close proximity.

Via Seth Dixon
Ms. Harrington's insight:

And again in Brazil

http://civitasinclusive.wordpress.com/2013/03/16/paraisopolis-brazil-by-tuca-vieira-2004/

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Jessica Ruddy's curator insight, May 27, 12:14 PM

This would be a great resource for Unit 7 Urbanization

Clarissa Rangel's curator insight, May 28, 5:49 PM

Interesting look at the social mobility of a super-urban area. 

Sid McIntyre-DeLaMelena's curator insight, May 29, 9:26 AM

An advertising campaign hopes to show the differences of income and living standards between neighborhoods in Mexico.

The place of these areas are so vastly different as well as there interactions as the lower class makes shanty architecture and the upper class develops large condos and buildings just for residence.

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Places in their Proper Perspectives

Places in their Proper Perspectives | Teachers Toolbox | Scoop.it

"A fisherman's cottage is described by real estate agents as a 'property not to be missed' but it is also just yards away from two nuclear power stations."


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Adilson Camacho's curator insight, January 31, 3:19 PM

Versões...

Fern Torres's curator insight, February 3, 1:11 PM

Perception is everything!

Jess Deady's curator insight, April 16, 10:35 AM

This house is 100% misleading. The paper advertised the first picture, which from the looks of it isn't so bad. Then when you get the reverse picture and see the nuclear power plants behind it, its a whole new scene! Whoever is trying to sell this house- good luck to you. Who wants to live next to something that could literally kill god knows what? Not me. 

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Unnatural Landscapes

Unnatural Landscapes | Teachers Toolbox | Scoop.it

In a world where photoshop has made the unreal seem ordinary, these unearthly seemingly landscapes might seem likely fakes.  The world can be that extraordinary.  Pictured above is the "Door to Hell" in Turkmenistan.  Rich with natural gas, Soviets were drilling in 1971 when the drilling rig collapsed and left a huge (230 feet wide) hole.  In an attempt to stop gas leaks they hoped a fire would burn off any discharge, but it is still burning today.  Enjoy this gallery of 25 'unnatural' images.   


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oliviersc's comment, November 13, 2012 2:50 PM
Shared in this Revue : Cheesecake et bonnets pour tenir chaud = http://blogoliviersc.org/?p=5974
Ryan G Soares's curator insight, December 3, 2013 7:53 AM

Some of the best looking images I have ever seen! The picture I found most facinating was the "Door To Hell". The Door to Hell is filled with natural gas. "In an attempt to stop gas leaks they hoped a fire would burn off any discharge, but it is still burning today." The fire started in 1971 and it is still burning today!? CRAZY

 

Jess Deady's curator insight, May 4, 7:05 AM

Sometimes you really can't tell whether a picture is real or not. How do landscapes like this form on their own? In this particular picture, the cause of a drilling rig has left a giant hole. The fire is still burning and has left the world to see a beautiful, unnatural landscape.

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40 Of The Most Powerful Photographs Ever Taken

40 Of The Most Powerful Photographs Ever Taken | Teachers Toolbox | Scoop.it
A moving collection of iconic photographs from the last 100 years that demonstrate the heartbreak of loss, the tremendous power of loyalty, and the triumph of the human spirit. Warning: Some of the...

 


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Portraits of people living on a dollar a day

Portraits of people living on a dollar a day | Teachers Toolbox | Scoop.it

"More than a billion people around the world subsist on a dollar a day, or less. The reasons differ but the day-to-day hardship of their lives are very similar. A book by Thomas A Nazario, founder of the International Organisation, documents the circumstances of those living in extreme poverty across the globe, accompanied by photographs from Pulitzer prizewinner Renée C Byer. Living On A Dollar a Day is published by Quantuck Lane."


Via Seth Dixon
Ms. Harrington's insight:

Extreme poverty is defined by the World Bank living on under $1.25 per day.  The geography of of extreme poverty highly uneven--two thirds of the extremely poor live in just 5 countries (India, China, Nigeria, Bangladesh and DR Congo)   - Seth Dixon

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Joy Kinley's curator insight, June 16, 12:21 PM

Poverty is nothing new but in the last hundred years the gulf between those that have money and those that don't has become almost insurmountable.  The lack of support systems that many in the West take for granted is absent in many developing countries.  

 

Access to education and health care are vital if these situations are to ever improve. 

Rianne Tolsma's curator insight, June 18, 4:07 AM

add your insight...

MsPerry's curator insight, August 25, 1:47 PM

APHG-Unit 2 & Unit 6

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22 International Borders

22 International Borders | Teachers Toolbox | Scoop.it

"Brazil (top) and Bolivia (bottom)."


Via Seth Dixon
Ms. Harrington's insight:

Borders can tell us a great feel about the relationship beween the two  nations.

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Jason Wilhelm's curator insight, May 22, 9:52 AM

The concept of a political boundary has been developed over many many years into an unbreakable line between two different sets of people with different ideologies, religions, and government styles. The boundary extends into the ground, into the air, and includes any resources within the boundary. These pictures show the different shapes and various lines between countries, and displays the intricacies of boundaries in the world.  

Kampe Kyle's curator insight, May 28, 7:21 PM

In AP Human Geo., this relates to the concept of land use patterns. As certain countries practice deforestation, slash-and-burn and other land use types, bordering countries may take a completely indifferent approach to the land and thus create a contrast.

Lauren Sellers's curator insight, May 28, 10:11 PM

Photographs show how different countries can be even by just the border. Number 3 really stuck out to me that Haiti doesnt have as many regulation reguarding deforestation as the Dominican Republic and its very noticable.

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10 of the Most Dangerous Journeys to Schools Around the World

10 of the Most Dangerous Journeys to Schools Around the World | Teachers Toolbox | Scoop.it

"Many of us have heard the stories of how our parents or grandparents had to walk miles in the snow to get to school. Perhaps some of these tales were a tad embellished, but we got the point. A lot of American kids have the luxury of being driven in a warm car or bus to a good school nearby. This is not the case for the children in this gallery.

The photos you are about to see are snapshots of the treacherous trips kids around the world take each day to get an education. Considering there are currently 61 million children worldwide who are not receiving an education—the majority of which are girls—these walks are seen as being well worth the risk.

In the above photo, students in Indonesia hold tight while crossing a collapsed bridge to get to school in Banten village on January 19, 2012.Flooding from the Ciberang river broke a pillar supporting the suspension bridge, which was built in 2001."


Via Seth Dixon
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Kevin Cournoyer's comment, April 30, 2013 9:51 PM
This slideshow makes it painfully clear that the degree to which a country is developed makes for very different experiences when it comes to education and physically getting to a school. Less developed countries clearly present different, in many cases, more dangerous obstacles to arriving at a school than well developed countries present.
The climate and geographic features found in other countries seem to often be what creates the challenges in getting young people to schools. Economically, these countries are clearly disadvantaged, as the lack of a viable infrastructure would indicate. Due to this lack of infrastructure, the journey to school is dangerous and arduous. A certain resilience can be seen in these pictures, however. Those who take these dangerous trips to schools miles away or over dangerous terrain clearly value education, indicating a cultural emphasis on the importance of learning, many times in spite of harsh geographic factors.
Rebecca Farrea's curator insight, September 11, 2013 11:52 AM

It is sad what so many children must endure and go through in order to get an education.  I wonder if these bridges and structures have been fixed.  61 million children not receiving an education is 61 million too many.

Courtney Barrowman's curator insight, April 1, 11:45 AM

unit 6 economic development

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Ghosts of War

Ghosts of War | Teachers Toolbox | Scoop.it
The remarkable pictures show scenes from France today with atmospheric photographs taken in the same place during the war superimposed on top.

 

In this fastinating set of images, Dutch artist and historian Jo Teeuwisse merges her passions literally by superimposing World War II photographs on to modern pictures of the where the photos were originally taken.  This serves as a reminder that places are rich with history; to understand the geography of a place, one must also know it's history (and vice versa).   

 

Tags: Europe, war, images, historial, place. 


Via Seth Dixon
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Al Picozzi's curator insight, July 30, 2013 12:02 PM

Incredible to see this kind of work.  I really hope this helps people remember what happened and what was given up in World War II.  As we lost more vets every day, we really need to make sure their scarifice is not forgotten.  Incredible piece of work here.

Lauren Stahowiak's curator insight, February 25, 9:56 AM

Historian Jo Teeuwisse creates dramatic imagery by overlaying negative images onto current images. These World War II photos show how different things were at the time and how people walk these streets everyday and may not even think twice about the streets history. Art is the best way to show emotion, and Jo Teeuwisse's art imposes a creative take on this.

Cam E's curator insight, February 27, 8:26 AM

I'm not even sure what to say about this set of pictures exactly, except that they're a very cool way to see history. I'm interesting in Social Studies and history because I'm captivated by seeing the world framed in a story, and these images do just that. To see the same places where the war was fought and what has changed is great, but these photos also give the impression of some stories of war. The idea of them being "ghosts" gives the impression of something left behind which marks the land even to this day.