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History and American Government Resources
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From Germany to Mexico: How America’s source of immigrants has changed over a century

From Germany to Mexico: How America’s source of immigrants has changed over a century | Teachers Toolbox | Scoop.it
Today's volume of immigrants, in some ways, is a return to America’s past.

Via Seth Dixon
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Miroslav Sopko's curator insight, June 16, 8:41 AM

Ako sa mení krajina väčšiny imigrantov do USA.

Courtney Barrowman's curator insight, June 17, 9:34 AM

unit 2

Jim Doyle's curator insight, June 23, 6:52 AM
From Germany to Mexico: How America’s source of immigrants has changed over a century
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The Names Behind The States

The Names Behind The States | Teachers Toolbox | Scoop.it

An infographic of the etymology and cultural origins of the names that made the United States of America.


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Seth Dixon's comment, May 6, 2013 3:21 PM
@Carly, Texas is also inaccurate...
Francisco Javier 's curator insight, May 12, 2013 8:52 PM

The Names Behind The States | @scoopit via @APHumanGeog http://sco.lt/...

Aulde de Barbuat's comment, May 18, 2013 7:08 AM
quite interesting, thanks. Unhappily, the link seems broken..Do you happen to have another one?
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Out of Africa – Did the Colonial Powers ever Really Leave?

Out of Africa – Did the Colonial Powers ever Really Leave? | Teachers Toolbox | Scoop.it
Africa may have achieved independence, but the old colonial ties are still important as France’s decision to send troops to Mali to fight Islamist extremists shows.

Via Seth Dixon
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Nathan Chasse's curator insight, March 25, 12:59 PM

Colonial ties are still very prevalent due to Europe's dependence upon the resources of Africa. European countries like England and France invest billions in Africa, not to help those African nations, but to build infrastructure for resource extraction or to keep governments stable. Though the true exploitation of Africa has ended, the current situation certainly has the ring of exploitation as the people of Europe enjoy the diamonds and chocolate harvested by the multitudes of impoverished people of Africa.

Jess Deady's curator insight, May 4, 4:04 PM

Colony powers are still located within Africa. Just because Africa is technically independent doesn't mean that British Colonial power isn't still in place.

Courtney Barrowman's curator insight, September 11, 2:11 PM

unit 4

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When Did Americans Lose Their British Accents?

When Did Americans Lose Their British Accents? | Teachers Toolbox | Scoop.it
Readers Nick and Riela have both written to ask how and when English colonists in America lost their British accents and how American accents came

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Jess Pitrone's comment, April 29, 2013 9:06 PM
I think that language and accents are part of what defines a region. Although it isn’t a physical geographical characteristic, an accent can help you to identify where you are in the world, or within a particular nation. As Americans, we hear British accents as something completely different then our own, but in reality, they aren’t that different. As the article says, even though there are distinct General American accents and the BBC English accent, there are still parts of Great Britain and part of the US that share the rhotic and non-rhotic accents.
Accents are part of the culture that defines a geographical area. I would say that accent can be both a over-arching part of culture, like, for example, the General American accent that defines the whole nation culturally, or a small part of regional culture, like, for example, the specific Boston accent.
John Peterson's comment, April 30, 2013 10:38 AM
This article brings up an interesting point on how accents within a given language can be hard to determine, and they can change drastically over time for no apparent reason. In colonial times, because most colonial settlers were English, they would obviously have similar accents to those of the British. While this is the case, over time with exposure to their own practices as well as other societies and their accents, they may have begun to slowly form their own accents. While it is obvious that “American” and “British” accents are inherently different, this was not always so. What caused this shift and when did it occur? It is hard to say, especially with how accents have continued to develop even within the classification of American or British accents. It is hard to determine what is a truly American or British accent because of the numerous regional accents that are present in today’s society. As a result, it is even more difficult to determine when the initial change in accents occurred in our past.
Max Krishchuk's comment, April 30, 2013 10:47 AM
This is a great question because no one has really dwelled on the question. I like that the people talked about the rhotacism aspect of it because I had never known that before. This is very important because that is the exact way that the British and American languages are different. I think that it is very important to understand this subject because it shows the exact way that we speak differently from British people. I like that the people who discussed the question talked about the history that is involved, or the lack of the history that is involved. The people who truly want to study this question have to read books on this subject because it seems like there is not that much information on it. American speech sounds more modern and middle class to me, while the British language sounds like it is for the upper class.
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Manifest Destiny in 141 Maps

Manifest Destiny in 141 Maps | Teachers Toolbox | Scoop.it

This data visualization project is a great way to demonstrate the geographic expansion of the United States.  This is much more interactive than the typical time lapse video since you can scroll through the maps and explore each map through the interactive features. 

 

Tags: historical, USA, visualization, mapping.


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Matthew Jones's comment, November 5, 2012 11:20 AM
This is a great. Definitely a great tool for students in various different levels of school that can show you the evolution of the United States over a period of time. Very cool, very useful.
Matt Mallinson's comment, November 5, 2012 11:24 AM
I really like the display of these changes in our country throughout the years. It's a great way of showing centuries of change into something easy to understand. This would help young students in a social studies class for sure.
Lisa Fonseca's comment, November 6, 2012 10:35 PM
i LOVE THIS! I can see this being such a valuable tool to use in a classroom. Students get the visual and written representation. Having the visual changes that took place in the United States is a better way to present to the students instead of them just reading a book. Will definitely save this article for future reference.
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The Geography of Language

"Over the course of human history, thousands of languages have developed from what was once a much smaller number. How did we end up with so many? And how do we keep track of them all? Alex Gendler explains how linguists group languages into language families, demonstrating how these linguistic trees give us crucial insights into the past."


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Catherine Smyth's curator insight, June 2, 7:45 PM

Not really primary geography but so interesting!

Woodstock School's curator insight, June 4, 6:05 AM

A good teaching tool for explaining the diversity of languages.

Adilson Camacho's curator insight, June 12, 9:38 PM

Geografia Cultural

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Out of Africa – Did the Colonial Powers ever Really Leave?

Out of Africa – Did the Colonial Powers ever Really Leave? | Teachers Toolbox | Scoop.it
Africa may have achieved independence, but the old colonial ties are still important as France’s decision to send troops to Mali to fight Islamist extremists shows.

Via Seth Dixon, AP US History
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Nathan Chasse's curator insight, March 25, 12:59 PM

Colonial ties are still very prevalent due to Europe's dependence upon the resources of Africa. European countries like England and France invest billions in Africa, not to help those African nations, but to build infrastructure for resource extraction or to keep governments stable. Though the true exploitation of Africa has ended, the current situation certainly has the ring of exploitation as the people of Europe enjoy the diamonds and chocolate harvested by the multitudes of impoverished people of Africa.

Jess Deady's curator insight, May 4, 4:04 PM

Colony powers are still located within Africa. Just because Africa is technically independent doesn't mean that British Colonial power isn't still in place.

Courtney Barrowman's curator insight, September 11, 2:11 PM

unit 4

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Top 10 Countries That Disappeared In The 20th Century

Top 10 Countries That Disappeared In The 20th Century | Teachers Toolbox | Scoop.it
New nations seem to pop up with alarming regularity. At the start of the 20th century, there were only a few dozen independent sovereign states on the planet; today, there are nearly 200!

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Kevin Cournoyer's comment, May 1, 2013 12:54 AM
I found this article really interesting for a few different reasons. As a history major, the article provided a lot of information that I thought was interesting and of which I was unaware. It’s important to understand the reasons for the breakup and/or formation of countries when studying history. Part of understanding that is recognizing and analyzing the geographic implications of these changes.
Perhaps most importantly, the disappearance of countries would certainly have severe economic repercussions. The complete absence of an economy that had been around for decades, or the emergence of several new economies all at once would have serious effects on the interaction between neighboring countries and the global economy. Cultural unity and tension also plays a large role in the disappearance of countries. Examining patterns of cultural dissimilarity and hostility explains the breakup of these countries and makes for nations that possess a great deal of cultural homogeneity and a palette of cultural diversity in a small geographic area.
Al Picozzi's curator insight, July 2, 2013 11:38 AM

Amazing to see many of the countries and empires that are no longer around.  Also with the dissoution of many of the empires it lead's to many of the issues that were are dealiing with today.  Splitting the Austro-Hugaraian Empire after WWI along ethnic lines didn't really work and helped to lead to WWII.  The Germans in the Sudetenland in Czechoslovakia fro example.  See http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/File:Sudetendeutsche_gebiete.svg

 for the area of German population.

Lauren Stahowiak's curator insight, February 27, 5:01 PM

10 countries that have become nonexistent in the 20th century include Tibet, East Germany and Yugoslavia. These countries have died off because of ethic, religious and cultural falls that were quickly taken over by bigger and more powerful countries.

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Ghosts of War

Ghosts of War | Teachers Toolbox | Scoop.it
The remarkable pictures show scenes from France today with atmospheric photographs taken in the same place during the war superimposed on top.

 

In this fastinating set of images, Dutch artist and historian Jo Teeuwisse merges her passions literally by superimposing World War II photographs on to modern pictures of the where the photos were originally taken.  This serves as a reminder that places are rich with history; to understand the geography of a place, one must also know it's history (and vice versa).   

 

Tags: Europe, war, images, historial, place. 


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Lauren Stahowiak's curator insight, February 25, 12:56 PM

Historian Jo Teeuwisse creates dramatic imagery by overlaying negative images onto current images. These World War II photos show how different things were at the time and how people walk these streets everyday and may not even think twice about the streets history. Art is the best way to show emotion, and Jo Teeuwisse's art imposes a creative take on this.

Cam E's curator insight, February 27, 11:26 AM

I'm not even sure what to say about this set of pictures exactly, except that they're a very cool way to see history. I'm interesting in Social Studies and history because I'm captivated by seeing the world framed in a story, and these images do just that. To see the same places where the war was fought and what has changed is great, but these photos also give the impression of some stories of war. The idea of them being "ghosts" gives the impression of something left behind which marks the land even to this day.

Samuel D'Amore's curator insight, September 10, 2:56 PM

Very interesting, I've seen similar things done with Russian cities and parts of the Ukaranian country side.