Teachers Toolbox
295 views | +0 today
Follow
Teachers Toolbox
History and American Government Resources
Curated by Ms. Harrington
Your new post is loading...
Your new post is loading...
Rescooped by Ms. Harrington from Geography Education
Scoop.it!

Where Each City's Uninsured Live

Where Each City's Uninsured Live | Teachers Toolbox | Scoop.it
Insured people are all alike, but uninsured people are uninsured for their own reasons.

 

It can be tempting to think of 'the uninsured' as the poorest of the poor. But that's not entirely the case. While people living below the poverty line are the most likely to be without health insurance, 28 percent of people who make between 100 and 200 percent of poverty level (up to about $23,340) lack coverage, as do 15 percent of those who make between 200 and 400 percent (up to about $46,700).

These maps, created by Kevin Johnson and used here with permission, show where people not covered by either private or public insurance live in each city. Johnson used the 2012 American Community Survey; higher uninsured rates are represented by red and orange colors.


Via Seth Dixon
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Ms. Harrington from Geography Education
Scoop.it!

Infant Mortality Rates

Infant Mortality Rates | Teachers Toolbox | Scoop.it
Are All Mothers Created Equal? From the State of the World's Mothers 2012 report see how mothers locations have an impact on the life and death of their children.

Via Seth Dixon
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Ms. Harrington from Geography Education
Scoop.it!

How was the AIDS epidemic reversed?

How was the AIDS epidemic reversed? | Teachers Toolbox | Scoop.it

"The breakthrough came in 1996, when a new class of antiretroviral drug called protease inhibitors was launched. These were used in combination with two older drugs that worked in different ways. The combination meant that evolving resistance required the simultaneous appearance of several beneficial (from the virus’s point of view) mutations—which is improbable.  With a viable treatment available, political action became more realistic. AIDS had been a “political” disease from the beginning, because a lot of the early victims were middle-class gay Americans, a group already politically active. Activists were split between those who favoured treating people already infected and those who wanted to stop new infections. The latter were more concerned to preach the message of safe sex and make condoms widely available, so that people could practise what was preached. Gradually, however, activists on both sides realised that the drugs, by almost abolishing the virus from a sufferer’s body, also render him unlikely to pass it on. They are, in other words, a dual-use technology."


Via Seth Dixon
more...
Hector Alonzo's curator insight, December 15, 2014 3:22 PM

As the article states, the AIDS virus was not known to the science community during the diseases' first years of emergance, but thanks to science, research was put on the forefront to stop AIDS. Unfortunately, the Disease is still incurable, but as the author says, some cases of the virus disappearing from the sufferers' body, it gives hope that a cure may be found someday. The AIDs virus will always be a hot topic and is referred to as the "Political" disease and must pose a threat to rich people in order for the pharmaceutical companies to develop cures.

Samuel D'Amore's curator insight, December 17, 2014 12:52 AM

This article discusses the recent treatments and their success in treating AIDs. For many years AIDs spread rapidly across Africa and even today it still spreads, luckily two things have begun to slow down it's advance. Both the increase in the use of contraception such as condoms which protect against AIDs as well as the production of antibiotics  made available to many at risk of AIDs. This shows that with decent government backing it is possible to stem outbreaks such as this.

Norka McAlister's curator insight, March 28, 2015 3:13 PM

In the late 1990s, it is estimated that 15 million of people had died because of AIDS in Africa. As all social classes were  affected by the virus, even political figures, many international organizations and private businesses were integrated into research treatment. However, the main obstacle in combating this disease is that there is not enough money to fund the necessary treatment for people in many African countries. Although, many organizations have embarked on campaigns regarding how to prevent this dreadful disease from spreading further and these efforts have proved successful in the past decade.