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Rescooped by Melina Dayana Calizaya Torres from 21st Century Learning and Teaching
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Personalize Learning: Learning can and should be Natural and Engaging | Learning by Doing

Personalize Learning: Learning can and should be Natural and Engaging | Learning by Doing | TEACHERMELINACT | Scoop.it

Apply New Learning Often and in Meaningful Contexts 
The more you can apply what you're learning to your every day, the more it'll stick in your head. The reason is simple. When you're learning by doing, you're implementing everything that makes our memory work. When you're able to connect what you're learning with a real world task, that forms the bonds in your brain, and subsequently the skills you're learning will stick around. 

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We learn best when we have context, and that applies to new skills as much as it does random facts in school. That's why something like the transfer of learning is helpful when you’re learning a new skill. This means you're applying your new skills in your day to day life in a context that matters. (http://lifehacker.com/the-science-behind-how-we-learn-new-skills-908488422)

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Learn more:

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https://gustmees.wordpress.com/2014/10/03/design-the-learning-of-your-learners-students-ideas/

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Via Gust MEES
Melina Dayana Calizaya Torres's insight:

BOTH OF THEM 

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Karen B Wehner's curator insight, April 8, 2015 11:18 AM

Not much that hasn't been said before, but it's all worth repeating. 

Inma Contreras's curator insight, April 14, 2015 7:34 AM

The best way to learn,in my opinion. Learning by doing including emotions:perfection.

Jake Goulet's curator insight, April 15, 2015 11:40 AM

Learn the ways of learning and make your life easier!

Rescooped by Melina Dayana Calizaya Torres from Technology in Business Today
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Fifteen Futuristic Technologies you’ll see in your Lifetime

Fifteen Futuristic Technologies you’ll see in your Lifetime | TEACHERMELINACT | Scoop.it
Fifteen Futuristic Technologies you’ll see in your Lifetime

Via TechinBiz
Melina Dayana Calizaya Torres's insight:

OMG

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Rescooped by Melina Dayana Calizaya Torres from 21st Century Learning and Teaching
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New Vision for Education_Report2015

Especially check the TOPIC <===> Chapter 1: The skills needed in the 21st century <===> #eSkills!


Learn more:


https://gustmees.files.wordpress.com/2015/02/practice-21st-century-assessment-flowchart-page3-simplified-pdf.pdf


https://gustmees.wordpress.com/2014/07/10/education-collaboration-and-coaching-the-future/


https://gustmees.wordpress.com/2015/03/28/learning-to-learn-for-my-professional-development-i-did-it-my-way/



Via Manuel Pinto, Maria José Brites, Rui Guimarães Lima, Miloš Bajčetić, Mark E. Deschaine, PhD, Gust MEES
Melina Dayana Calizaya Torres's insight:

SO TRUE

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Gust MEES's curator insight, April 4, 2015 11:18 AM

Especially check the TOPIC <===> Chapter 1: The skills needed in the 21st century <===> #eSkills!


Learn more:


https://gustmees.files.wordpress.com/2015/02/practice-21st-century-assessment-flowchart-page3-simplified-pdf.pdf


https://gustmees.wordpress.com/2014/07/10/education-collaboration-and-coaching-the-future/


https://gustmees.wordpress.com/2015/03/28/learning-to-learn-for-my-professional-development-i-did-it-my-way/


David Witzeling's curator insight, April 6, 2015 7:22 PM

This is a lengthy article detailing the relationship between 21st century skills and the adoption of technology as a way to promote growth in those skill areas. If you are here, you might find this very much "preaching to the choir," but the article provides a solid basis for understanding the need to integrate technology into education.

Dr. Deborah Brennan's curator insight, April 7, 2015 2:19 PM

The World Economic Forum has published a new white paper called New Vision for Education: Unlocking the Potential of Technology; the link for the full report is included at the end of this article.  The World Economic Forum is a not-for-profit international institution headquartered in Geneva, Switzerland.  Although the focus of this report is worldwide, the gaps in identified twenty-first century skills are very applicable to schools in the USA.  In a powerful statement, the report says: “By the time students enter college and the labour market, deficiencies that have not been addressed earlier can be far more difficult and costly to remedy.” (p 8-9).

The report differentiates 21st century skills among foundational literacies, competencies, and character qualities. It sees foundational skills as what schools and systems traditionally teach and measure: literacy, numeracy, scientific literacy, instructional-communication technology literacy, financial literacy, and cultural and civic literacy.  Competencies sited include critical thinking/problem solving, creativity, communication and collaboration. While curiosity, initiative, persistence/grit, adaptability, leadership, and social and cultural awareness are included in a category called character qualities.  Appendix 1 includes definitions of 21st century skills.

The instructional cycle is referred to as a “closed loop” in this report. Beginning with clear learning objectives through the development of curriculum and instructional strategies to instructional delivery, ongoing assessment, interventions and the tracking of learning outcomes in a repeating complex system.  The report looks at ways that technology can be embedded into each step of the instructional loop to improve student learning outcomes and eliminate the skill gap, providing some resources that might be used at different phases of the cycle.

The report cites differences in the use of technology tools to close the skill gap, looking at different income levels among countries which create different contexts and stating that there are fundamental social and economic problems, such as poverty, that impede learning and underlie the skills gap. Although the deficiencies in many undeveloped countries far surpass those found in the United States, it is my perspective that there are different contexts within the United States itself that must be acknowledged and addressed.

The importance of creativity, problem solving and innovation to the economic well-being of our nation and therefore, the employability of our workforce cannot be stressed enough. The pressure of standardized testing can lead to a standardized curriculum and instruction model that does not allow  the classroom time for these skills to develop. Teachers caught in this dilemma are often driven to insure success on state tests at the cost of providing time for experimentation, reflection, and collaborative feedback. The report does suggest using technology for some of the foundational skills in order to free teacher time to provide instruction on competency and character skills.

In two of the examples from low income countries, technology was used to provide scripted lessons that were created centrally  to under-trained teachers. My preference would be to  more fully train teachers or provide a mentor/coach rather than a “turn the page” curriculum model.

One of the tenants of the article is the need to define and find a metric to assess each of these 21st century skills in order to compare countries skill level. Although I agree with the need to define the skills needed and provide training and resources to teachers so these skills can be embedded into the curriculum and instruction, the idea of an assessment to measure creativity or persistence fills me with dread. Paul Torrance developed a well-used test for creativity used to screen students for school gifted and talented programs.  It is not a test that can be administered and interpreted without training. The idea of administering a standardized test which by definition is convergent in thinking to measure a thinking skill that is divergent by definition seems inappropriate and a major shortcoming of this report.

Rescooped by Melina Dayana Calizaya Torres from 21st Century Learning and Teaching
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The Difference Between Safety and Security | eSkills

The Difference Between Safety and Security | eSkills | TEACHERMELINACT | Scoop.it

Maslow’s Hierarchy of needs begins with humanity’s most basic needs and builds from there until we reach our most satisfied self. After our most basic physical needs (air, food, water, sleep), the need for safety is the second most critical stage to our wellbeing. Whether or not we believe in Maslow’s theory, we can all agree that on its surface this makes sense, whether we are talking about ourselves, our families, our businesses, or our community.

 

Learn more:

 

https://gustmees.wordpress.com/2014/11/18/why-cybersecurity-starts-at-home-and-is-concerning-all-of-us/

 

https://gustmees.wordpress.com/2015/03/09/how-will-the-world-look-in-the-near-future-because-of-ict-our-new-habits/

 

https://gustmees.wordpress.com/2012/11/29/cyber-hygiene-ict-hygiene-for-population-education-and-business/

 


Via Gust MEES
Melina Dayana Calizaya Torres's insight:

OHHHHHH

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Gust MEES's curator insight, April 6, 2015 3:42 PM

Maslow’s Hierarchy of needs begins with humanity’s most basic needs and builds from there until we reach our most satisfied self. After our most basic physical needs (air, food, water, sleep), the need for safety is the second most critical stage to our wellbeing. Whether or not we believe in Maslow’s theory, we can all agree that on its surface this makes sense, whether we are talking about ourselves, our families, our businesses, or our community.


Learn more:


https://gustmees.wordpress.com/2014/11/18/why-cybersecurity-starts-at-home-and-is-concerning-all-of-us/


https://gustmees.wordpress.com/2015/03/09/how-will-the-world-look-in-the-near-future-because-of-ict-our-new-habits/


https://gustmees.wordpress.com/2012/11/29/cyber-hygiene-ict-hygiene-for-population-education-and-business/