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TNTP Teaching Fellows: Our Training - YouTube

Karla Luetzow's insight:

The New Teacher Project is an organization founded by former Teach for America alum Michelle Rhee. Instead of a five week program, the New Teacher Project works actively with their teacher fellows in the classroom. This short two-minute video gives a clear representation of this program’s teacher training.

 

I really enjoyed this video. I think this program is the happy in-between of Teach for America and normal undergraduate teacher certification. As the teacher stated in the video, she always dreamed of becoming a teacher, but the normal certification process did not work with her schedule. Therefore, the New Teacher Project allows her to be able to teach in a shorter time but allows her to grow as a teacher with a mentor giving her feedback along the way. It is incorporating the student teaching internship in a faster paced environment.

 

I found it particularly powerful when one teacher remarked about her status as a teacher. Instead of calling herself a teacher, she called herself an “educator.” Instead of this just being a job, she called it a career path. The tone in her voice seemed very passionate to me. I hope that one day I can call myself an educator with as much passion as the one in the video. This kind of program seems to foster teachers that really care about the students. These teachers are learning to teach the students in the most effective way as possible.  Overall, The New Teacher Project is a project that I support. It is similar but different from Teach for America. If I had to choose between the two, I would choose The New Teacher Project because the teacher training seems to promote better, more prepared teachers.

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Guilford schools explores young teacher retention program - Greensboro News & Record

Guilford schools explores young teacher retention program - Greensboro News & Record | Teacher Training | Scoop.it
Guilford schools explores young teacher retention program
Greensboro News & Record
The board narrowed from five to two the number of options for attendance zones for the new George C. Simkins Elementary, which is under construction at 3511 E.
Karla Luetzow's insight:

This local news article discusses the adding of more Teach For America corps members to North Carolina’s Guildford County’s middle and high schools. A positive would be adding new, young spirited teachers to the faculty. They hope Teach for America will help with teacher turnover. However, this article stresses the amount of money for investing in the program (around 2 million) and if five weeks of Teach for America training can adequately prepare these Teach For America teachers. Without a school district vote, the final decision to add more Teach for America corps members is up to the school district Superintendent.

 

Insight:

This article showcased the major debate about Teach for America. In order to be accepted in Teach for America, one must hold an undergraduate degree and be highly qualified because it is a competitive application process. The training for Teach for America is very quick. The summer before the beginning school year Teach for America corps members undergo a five week training program. Compared to teachers who receive their undergraduate’s degree certification, this time period is extremely short. As someone majoring in Education, I agree that five weeks is not enough time to be fully prepared to be a teacher. Student teaching is a vital of process of becoming a teacher. I think the stress of jumping into the teaching would not be healthy for the new teacher or the students. In fact, just thinking about it leaves me feeling uneasy. I know that I would not feel prepared after a five week program. While some Teach For America teachers do succeed,  a longer time with a mentor and slowly working up to teaching students could create a more solidified teaching network.  It is true that one may never feel fully prepared to dive into teaching. One may just have to wing it the first year and hope for the best. However, I realized through EDCI280 that just having more time in the classroom leaves one feeling more or less confident about one’s desire to teach. In the very least, more teacher training can confirm one’s passion and desire to be a teacher.

 

 

 

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Shanghai's 'mind boggling' school ambition - BBC News

Shanghai's 'mind boggling' school ambition - BBC News | Teacher Training | Scoop.it
BBC News
Shanghai's 'mind boggling' school ambition
BBC News
Mr Schleicher, who runs the Pisa tests taken every three years, says Shanghai is engaged in a systematic, long-term project to improve education, as a way of transforming its economy.
Karla Luetzow's insight:

Summary:

 

This news article reflects on Shanghai’s successful education system in China’s standardized PISA testing. This article attributes the success to Shanghai’s very influential and respected teachers. From calling to check on home life every two weeks to giving parenting advice, these teachers are highly respected which enhances the education system.

 

Insight:

 

I found it extremely interesting to read about Shanghai’s education system. Prior to reading this article, I had no idea how involved teachers were in these students’ lives. I really liked how teachers call home to check on the students’ home studying habits. As I have learned from working with students in my AmericaCounts mentoring program, home life can make a huge difference in academic ability. Many times my mentees do not do homework, because their parents believe chores are more important. Home life can be a root cause for student's struggling academically. By checking on home life, these Shanghai teachers are reaching the root cause of many academic issues.

            This article also connects to the article about Finland’s education system.Both places are looked upon as great places for education. The common factor between the two is the respect for teachers. As one expert on education remarks about Shanghai teachers, “they make it prestigious to teach in a tough school." This prestige and respect cannot be learned or taught. Instead, it is something earned. I believe respect is a great influence on anyone’s demeanor. It is a very powerful tool. I hope that in the United States one day teachers will be revered with as much admiration as in Shanghai or Finland.

 

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I Almost Quit Teach for America

I Almost Quit Teach for America | Teacher Training | Scoop.it
But I didn't. Why? (I almost quit Teach For America: A personal essay about failure, hardship, and help http://t.co/lJgCxJXFPi)
Karla Luetzow's insight:

           Eleanor Barkhorn, a member of Teach for America Corps 2006, tells this personal essay.  In this essay, Eleanor lists all the struggles she encountered during her first year in Teach for America in the Mississippi Delta region, an area completely different than her hometown of New York City. In fact, she starts to believe she cannot handle Teach for America. She gets on the verge of quitting Teach for America. “My students talked over me, threw things at me, told me to go back where I came from,” remarked Eleanor. However, she decides to continue with Teach for America, which turns into the focus of her personal essay.

 

            As discussed in class,  many times the  media displays the bias that "anyone can teach." However, this personal essay expresses the extreme difficulty and hardship that comes with teaching especially in the program Teach for America. I really enjoyed reading this essay. It was very honest and vulnerable about the whole Teach for America program. She felt hopeless about her ability to teach. Sometimes, in my placement classroom, I feel a sense of hopelessness about the students and the education system. For example, However, essays like this remind me how many others teachers or teachers in training are experiencing the same hardship. 

         

One of the most powerful points in the essay was the concluding remark of enlightenment.  “But the most painful, crucial lesson I learned in my two years was a deep sense of my own limitations. Being well educated and well intentioned do not guarantee success in life. I am capable of repeated failure.” This very sincere statement holds especially true in the field of education. No matter how much teacher training a teacher receives there is no guarantee of standardized success in the classroom. On one’s own, it is very difficult to impact a classroom. It is more of a balancing act between the class, teacher, principal, and parents that can help determine success. Sometimes, it can be very much out of one teacher’s control. I think this is very important to remember when going into the field of education. However, Eleanor concludes the essay by stating, “And I cannot weather hardship without a tremendous amount of help.” Sometimes, it takes more than just one teacher to develop a student for success.  Eleanor saw her co-workers as the most influential in her staying with Teach for America. A teacher should never be afraid of finding a mentor and asking for help.

 

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secret-finland%E2%80%99s-success-educating-teachers.pdf

Karla Luetzow's insight:

Summary:

This scholarly article describes the teaching training process in Finland. Finland’s teacher training is very rigorous. Finland values education. The profession is regarded very highly.

           

Insight:

 

Teaching in Finland is a very “admired” profession. As we talked about in EDCI280, many educators in America do not receive the same reaction. In fact, I was told multiple times that I am “wasting my potential” by going into the field of education. It still saddens me that this is how teachers are perceived in the United States. The salary does not match the degree of difficulty and work a teacher must put into their job in the United States. While in Finland the salary is still in the average salary range, “more important than salaries are such factors as high social prestige, professional autonomy in schools, and the ethos of teaching as a service to society and the public good.” There each teacher is in the top ten percent of applicants. This competitive nature makes teaching an extremely difficult field to get into to. It is almost comparable to law school in the United States, but the Finnish government pays for the training. This puts the stress of paying off college loans off with a teacher’s salary out of the picture.

 Overall, I believe this is how teacher training should be in the United States. As the rigor for the training heightens, the qualifications and respect of applicants will increase as well. However, it will have to be a slow transition to this type of teacher training. One difference that I am not all for is that college preparation is the only way to be qualified to teach in Finland. As seen in other scoops, the United States has many alternative routes to teaching like Teach for America or The New Teacher Project. I think these alternative routes can also produce quality teachers. If these programs did not exist, some now excellent teachers would not have been able to discover their love for teaching. Therefore, I support some aspects of emulating Finland’s education system but not the system in its entirety.

 

 

 

 

 

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Teach for America corps looking to keep more of its teachers in high-poverty ... - The State

Teach for America corps looking to keep more of its teachers in high-poverty ... - The State | Teacher Training | Scoop.it
The State
Teach for America corps looking to keep more of its teachers in high-poverty ...
Karla Luetzow's insight:

This news article discusses Teach for America in high poverty areas in South Carolina. Cait Clark, a recent college graduate, joined Teach for America corps in one of the highest poverty areas in South Carolina, Malboro County. While Teach for America is only a two-year program, Cait decided to keep teaching in this area. Now, she is teaching while working with non-profits to supply students with much needed items such as pajamas and books.

 

Cait is an example of how they wish Teach for America worked in poverty areas. However, only around forty percent of Teach for America corps members in South Carolina stayed in their teaching profession. With the short teaching training and teacher career, I wonder the real impact of Teach for America in these poverty stricken communities. Cait’s story is very positive and inspirational. She is an outlier. The average Teach for America corps member lives in the poverty stricken area for about two years. After their two years in the program, they may stay in the education field, but rarely do they stay in the actual teaching profession. I do not believe that this aids any school. Teacher turnover impacts the overall feel of a school. By retaining teachers, the school’s faculty can bond and work together to improve the school.  Teachers can get to know whole families who go through the school. This can also have an impact on the students. I remember as a student in elementary school I would be deeply saddened when a past teacher would leave or retire. The school is more of a community when students know teachers from different grades and vice verse. Teach for America aids in the cycle of teachers leaving. Teach for America does recognize this problem and fortunately is trying to correct it. With 2.2 million dollars invested into the program, I believe they can find candiates who wish to continue teaching.

 

 

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Starting Teacher SAT Scores Rise As Educators Face Tougher Evaluations - Huffington Post

Starting Teacher SAT Scores Rise As Educators Face Tougher Evaluations - Huffington Post | Teacher Training | Scoop.it
Starting Teacher SAT Scores Rise As Educators Face Tougher Evaluations
Huffington Post
Tim Daly, president of TNTP, a group that provides alternative certification for teachers, agreed that the shifts are meaningful.
Karla Luetzow's insight:

Summary:

 

The United States has a trend of teachers being on the lower end on academic achievement in standardized testing. As seen in Finland, this is very different from other countries. However, future teachers’ SAT scores are improving. From once in the forty percentile for the SAT, teachers now fall in the fifty percentile. This trend is seen as a positive.

 

Insight:

 

In all honesty, this statistic dumbfounded me. I know that teachers are required to have the highest academic record, but I believe this SAT statistic is very low. For a teacher to receive a degree at a university, they must first be able to get into this university. I do not believe a person scoring into the fiftieth percentile would even be able to be accepted into Maryland. By doing some outside research, the average SAT in Maryland’s admissions is around 650 for reading and math. Both these scores fall way above fiftieth percentile of SAT scores. In fact, this score falls more into the upper eightieth percentile. Therefore, this article really shocked me, because I am surround by very intelligent education majors. While I do not believe standardized testing is at all a complete accurate measure of intelligence, it does have some correlation with basic reading and math skills.

            Overall, this article made me think about other ways teachers can be certified. From some outside research, I know that the online school, the University of Phoenix, is certifying the most teachers. This online school probably admits less competitive applicants compared to the University of Maryland or other universities around the country. While I believe progress is great, the SAT scores average for teachers are nowhere close to where I would want there to be. 

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