Teacher Tools and Tips
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Teacher Tools and Tips
Tools, tips and practices to share with teachers
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Rescooped by Sharrock from Leveling the playing field with apps
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TextGrabber + Translator App - Mobile Scanner for IPhone or IPad

TextGrabber + Translator App - Mobile Scanner for IPhone or IPad | Teacher Tools and Tips | Scoop.it

"TextGrabber + Translator turns your iPhone into a multifunctional mobile scanner with translation capability."

 

An inexpensive app that can actually turn an iPhone and IPad into a scanner. You simply take a picture of a document with your device and the app uses Optical Character Recognition to create an editable text file. Just take a picture of the text, and you can immediately edit it or translate, share via e-mail and SMS, or post directly to your account at on Facebook, Twitter and Evernote.

 

Not only that, but it can translate documents from more than 40 different languages. This app can also be very useful for anyone who prefers or needs to read (and manipulate) digital text documents rather than print documents.

 

One more app that is leveling the playing field!

 


Via Kathleen McClaskey
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Rescooped by Sharrock from Metaglossia: The Translation World
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Solem-Pfeifer: “Everything Is Illuminated” uses humor, charm mixed with sorrow in masterpiece

Solem-Pfeifer: “Everything Is Illuminated” uses humor, charm mixed with sorrow in masterpiece | Teacher Tools and Tips | Scoop.it

If you don't know the story of "Everything Is Illuminated," it's as beautiful as it is innovative and touching as it is charming (featuring an overarching tone that's perhaps summed up by a quote from the text: "Humor is the only truthful way to tell a sad story.") The plot of the book exists on several different planes: one that sees "the hero" of the novel (also named Jonathan Safran Foer) journeying to Ukraine to find a woman who may have saved his grandfather from the Nazis, one comprised of letters from Foer's translator, Alexander, to him and one that begins in the year 1791 and continues throughout history describing the past of the Ukrainian city, Trachimbrod.
Foer's prowess functions on two levels and though they might seem like fundamental holdings for a writer, it's rare to find a young author who can marry them so blissfully. The Ukrainian translator, Alexander, one of the most unforgettable characters in recent memory, is an egotistical, defeatist whose skills with the English language resemble those of a child who's memorized the most pretentious words in the dictionary, but has little inkling of how to adapt them from sentence to sentence. The character born from the alternately high and low-minded wordplay is as humorous as he is depressing, boasting of his "premium personhood" and indispensability to the female sex, while quietly admitting both his lies and inadequacies.
In much the same way, Foer manages scenes that appeal to a charming, yet low common denominator of humor in translation error that doubles as a saddening representation of a Ukrainian grandfather's anti-Semitism and personal suffering.


Via Charles Tiayon
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