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Tools, tips and practices to share with teachers
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Flies That Do Calculus With Their Wings

Flies That Do Calculus With Their Wings | Teacher Tools and Tips | Scoop.it
Scientists glued tiny magnets to fruit flies to learn about the millisecond aerial ballets required to stay aloft when you’re a tiny insect.
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excerpt: "At Cornell University, for instance, researchers have been investigating how the flies recover when their flight is momentarily disturbed. Among their conclusions: a small group of fly neurons is solving calculus problems, or what for humans are calculus problems."

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ERICDigests.Org - Providing full-text access to ERIC Digests

ERICDigests.Org - Providing full-text access to ERIC Digests | Teacher Tools and Tips | Scoop.it

What are ERIC Digests?

ERIC Digests are: 

- short reports (1,000 - 1,500 words) on topics of prime current interest in education. There are a large variety of topics covered including teaching, learning, libraries, charter schools, special education, higher education, home schooling, and many more.

- targeted specifically for teachers, administrators, policymakers, and other practitioners, but generally useful to the broad educational community. 

- designed to provide an overview of information on a given topic, plus references to items providing more detailed information. 

- produced by the former 16 subject-specialized ERIC Clearinghouses, and reviewed by experts and content specialists in the field. 

- funded by the Office of Educational Research and Improvement (OERI), of the U.S. Department of Education (ED). 

- The full-text ERIC Digest database contains over 3000 Digests with the latest updates being added to this site in July 2005. 

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How Many People Do I Need to Take My Survey? | SurveyMonkey Blog

How Many People Do I Need to Take My Survey? | SurveyMonkey Blog | Teacher Tools and Tips | Scoop.it
Great question! And we’ve got a handy-dandy table with the answers. To use the table, just ask yourself two questions: How many people are in your populati
Sharrock's insight:

Great information! It's probably one of the big ones for schools issuing surveys to their community members and stakeholders. Schools are trying to gather data to address student, family, community needs. We need more advice like this!

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Building a library for Information & Digital Li...

Building a library for Information & Digital Li... | Teacher Tools and Tips | Scoop.it
Building a library for Information & Digital Literacy Skills | Jorum Team Blog on CEET Meet (Oct'2013) Digital Literacy: Critical Thinking, Problem Solving, and Decision Making~Stephanie Samaras curated by Stephanie Samaras (Building a library for...

Via Joyce Valenza
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The Truth About The Left Brain / Right Brain Relationship

The Truth About The Left Brain / Right Brain Relationship | Teacher Tools and Tips | Scoop.it
Are you right-brained or left-brained? Or is the question itself a little harebrained?
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What saying 'I' says about you

What saying 'I' says about you | Teacher Tools and Tips | Scoop.it
Researchers say that your usage of the pronoun 'I' says more about you than you may realize.
Sharrock's insight:

One interesting statement: "Avoiding the first-person pronoun is distancing." I would be interested in the book "The Secret Life of Pronouns" just to find out why people refer to themselves in the third person (techically, using one's name when talking about oneself is not often using a pronoun, but maybe cognitively, it is. 

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Ivon Prefontaine's curator insight, October 10, 2013 12:31 PM

I wonder what it means when the person who overuses "I" has no real authority based on experience?

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Survey shows parent, educator support of Common Core

Survey shows parent, educator support of Common Core | Teacher Tools and Tips | Scoop.it
A national survey conducted by Utah-based School Improvement Network shows a majority of parents and educators support the Common Core State Standards.
Sharrock's insight:

from the article: "On the controversy the Common Core has generated, 70 percent of educators surveyed by School Improvement Network responded that they do not support political efforts to withdraw from the standards and 58 percent believe that common standards between states are necessary"

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Risk of crime in gated communities

Risk of crime in gated communities | Teacher Tools and Tips | Scoop.it
Gated communities are perceived to be safe havens in a world of risk and uncertainty, but new research from the United States challenges received opinion and suggests that, although opportunistic burglaries may be minimized, the risk of other...
Sharrock's insight:

from the article: "Research published this month in the journal Justice Quarterly confirms that homes in gated communities are subjected to fewer burglaries than those in non-gated communities. However, there is evidence that these communities not only push crime to other, less secure, neighbourhoods, but also present an increased risk of other crimes, including "intimate partner violence."


Teachers can help students gain an understanding of the complexity of social issues with this article. Students can research and discuss short term solutions to social issues like poverty, crime, unemployment. The important goal of such discussions may be to explore how simple solutions can/cannot solve big problems. Students need to become productive and informed citizens, wherever they are, by recognizing fallacies, complex issues, and the nature of different types of problems and problem solving. 

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Back to School with Google Docs: Support Research/Writing/ Collaboration

Back to School with Google Docs: Support Research/Writing/ Collaboration | Teacher Tools and Tips | Scoop.it

Via Beth Dichter
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Beth Dichter's curator insight, August 19, 2013 6:24 AM

Are you using Google Docs? This post explores many of the options available to you in Google Docs including:

* Google Docs for Research - Look under Tools to access Research. As well as allowing you to research within Google Docs this tool streamlines " the process of creating hyperlinks and appropriately formatting citations."

* Google Docs for Collaborative Writing - Some of the features of this tool include sharing and commenting, built-in dictionary, smart spell check and grammar check, one click footnotes and citations, Easy Bib connection and revision history.

The Common Core stresses the need for students to collaborate. Google Docs may assist your students in the process. The post also contains quite a few screenshots.

BI Media Specialists's curator insight, August 19, 2013 3:10 PM

Looks like an easy and interesting way to promote good research skills in the classroom!

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Let's eat cake! Luxury unwrapped

Let's eat cake! Luxury unwrapped | Teacher Tools and Tips | Scoop.it
Alice Blackhurst is one of six Cambridge PhD candidates to take part in a series of podcast interviews offering an insight into graduate research in the arts, humanities and social sciences. Her work focuses on ideas of luxury.
Sharrock's insight:

An exploration of the concept of "luxury" in the past and in our times. 

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The Us vs. Them Mentality: How Group Thinking Can Irrationally Divide Us

The Us vs. Them Mentality: How Group Thinking Can Irrationally Divide Us | Teacher Tools and Tips | Scoop.it
Studies show that thinking of ourselves in terms of groups automatically leads to a kind of irrational group favoritism, which ends up dividing society, instead of bringing us together.
Sharrock's insight:

This article is helpful in fighting our tendencies toward thinking in polarities (us/them, this/that, choice #1 vs. choice #2, etc.). We are more complex and complicated than these either/or set ups. And problems are often more complex or complicated than the questions often posed in this way. 

 

The concept photo does something interesting with the colors red and blue. In the United States, there are the Blue States and the Red States, layer that with the angel for blue and the devil for red. It works on two levels.

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Q: How to Connect Critical Thinking, Research, and Information Literacy?

Q: How to Connect Critical Thinking, Research, and Information Literacy? | Teacher Tools and Tips | Scoop.it

The value of what might be called “fan literacies” to the teaching of skills and concepts related to a range of curricular content, including (so far) writing fiction, the Hero’s Journey, and digital literacy/netiquette.


Via Karen Bonanno, Frank Carbullido
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Paula Correia's curator insight, April 29, 2013 3:19 PM

Como relacionar Pensamento Crítico, Pesquisa e Literacia da Informação?

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100 Search Engines For Academic Research

100 Search Engines For Academic Research | Teacher Tools and Tips | Scoop.it

100 Search Engines For Academic Research.. .Check out our new, up-to-date collection to discover the very best search engine for finding the academic results you’re looking for.


Via Louise Robinson-Lay, João Greno Brogueira, Dennis T OConnor
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Brenda O'Leary's comment, January 11, 2013 2:10 AM
Great Faye! have rescooped!!!!
A4Academics's comment, March 27, 2013 2:22 PM
Its wonderful list . Thanks for sharing it. I wasn't aware of such a big list till now.
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Study: Art Museums Foster Appreciation for Ambiguity

Study: Art Museums Foster Appreciation for Ambiguity | Teacher Tools and Tips | Scoop.it
New research from Vienna finds viewing artworks in a museum enhances the aesthetic experience.
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ERIC - Frequently Asked Questions

ERIC is an online library of education research and information, sponsored by the Institute of Education Sciences (IES) of the U.S. Department of Education.
Sharrock's insight:

From the page: "What journals are indexed in ERIC?

The list of currently approved journals can be found at: http://eric.ed.gov/?journals and the approved list of non-journal sources can be found at http://eric.ed.gov/?nonjournals

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Theories of Intelligence

Perkins' book contains extensive research-based evidence that education can be considerably improved by more explicit and appropriate teaching for transfer, focusing on higher-order cognitive skills, and the use of project-based learning.

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Robert Fisher Teaching Thinking homepage

This article explores what metacognition is, why it is important and how it develops in children. It argues that teachers need to help children develop metacognitive awareness, and identifies the factors which enhance metacognitive development. Metacognitive thinking is a key element in the transfer of learning. The child's development of metacognitive skills is defined as meta-learning. Meta-teaching strategies can help mediate the metacognitive skills of children, help to stimilate children's metacognitive thinking. The article draws upon reserch currently being undertaken in London schools on raising achievement in thinking and learning through developing the metacognition of children as learners in schools.


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Ivon Prefontaine's curator insight, December 13, 2013 11:51 AM

This looks like an interesting article.

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109 Common Core Resources For Teachers By Category

109 Common Core Resources For Teachers By Category | Teacher Tools and Tips | Scoop.it
109 Common Core Resources For Teachers By Category

 

The transition to the Common Core Standards is likely the single most significant change in the last 10 years in American public education.

While the English-Language Arts and Math haven’t changed, what the standards say about those content areas–and their relative complexity and rigor–are indeed different.

In a recent survey, you let us know you wanted more Common Core resources and support, so we’re going to ramp up our Common Core resources over the summer of 2013, including this list of various Common Core resources, separated by content area.

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How people argue with research they don’t like

How people argue with research they don’t like | Teacher Tools and Tips | Scoop.it
If you ever need to rebut a study whose conclusion you don't like, just follow this simple flowchart.
Sharrock's insight:

Great responses. Great flowchart. 

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Yelling At Kids Could Be Just As Harmful As Physical Discipline, Study Suggests - Huffington Post

Yelling At Kids Could Be Just As Harmful As Physical Discipline, Study Suggests - Huffington Post | Teacher Tools and Tips | Scoop.it
Yelling At Kids Could Be Just As Harmful As Physical Discipline, Study Suggests
Huffington Post
Sticks and stones indeed break bones -- but words can cause real harm to kids, too, a new study says.
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Lynnette Van Dyke's curator insight, September 8, 2013 8:00 PM

"Harsh verbal discipline" on the part of a parent increases a child’s risk for depression and aggressive behavior, and is "not uncommon," according to the research, which was published online earlier this week in Child Development. The disciplinary techniques in question include yelling, cursing and humiliation -- defined as "calling the child dumb, lazy, or something similar."

The study even suggests that verbal reprimands can have the same impact on children as physical punishment: "the negative effects of verbal discipline within the two-year period of [the] study were comparable to the effects shown over the same period of time in other studies that focused on physical discipline," a press release from the University of Pittsburgh, where the study's lead author is an assistant professor, explains.

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CENTRE FOR RESEARCH ON YOUTH AT RISK

CENTRE FOR RESEARCH ON YOUTH AT RISK | Teacher Tools and Tips | Scoop.it
Sharrock's insight:

from the webpage: "While there has been a fair amount of work done on identifying risk factors that, if present, may increase the likelihood of a young person's involvement in crime or other negative behaviour problems, there has also been some work done on the development of programs that build on the enhancement of protective factors which may reduce the effects of exposure to risk factors and thus lower the chances a youth will develop serious anti-social or other behaviour problems or become a victim.."

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The different kinds of research develops different kinds of knowledge

"Research and experimental development (R&D) comprise creative work undertaken on a systematic basis in order to increase the stock of knowledge, including knowledge of man, culture and society, and the use of this stock of knowledge to devise new applications." (OECD (2002) Frascati Manual: proposed standard practice for surveys on research and experimental development, 6th edition.)[1] It is used to establish or confirm facts, reaffirm the results of previous work, solve new or existing problems, support theorems, or develop new theories. A research project may also be an expansion on past work in the field. To test the validity of instruments, procedures, or experiments, research may replicate elements of prior projects, or the project as a whole. The primary purposes of basic research (as opposed to applied research) are documentation, discovery, interpretation, or the research and development of methods and systems for the advancement of human knowledge. Approaches to research depend on epistemologies, which vary considerably both within and between humanities and sciences. There are several forms of research: scientific, humanities, artistic, economic, social, business, marketing, practitioner research, etc.

Scientific research relies on the application of the scientific method, a harnessing of curiosity. This research provides scientific information and theories for the explanation of the nature and the properties of the world. It makes practical applications possible. Scientific research is funded by public authorities, by charitable organizations and by private groups, including many companies. Scientific research can be subdivided into different classifications according to their academic and application disciplines. Scientific research is a widely used criterion for judging the standing of an academic institution, such as business schools, but some argue that such is an inaccurate assessment of the institution, because the quality of research does not tell about the quality of teaching (these do not necessarily correlate totally).[2]

Research in the humanities involves different methods such as for example hermeneutics and semiotics, and a different, more relativist epistemology. Humanities scholars usually do not search for the ultimate correct answer to a question, but instead explore the issues and details that surround it. Context is always important, and context can be social, historical, political, cultural or ethnic. An example of research in the humanities is historical research, which is embodied in historical method. Historians use primary sources and other evidence to systematically investigate a topic, and then to write histories in the form of accounts of the past.

Sharrock's insight:

There is a long list of academic disciplines (fields of study). And the list keeps growing. “An academic discipline, or field of study, is a branch of knowledge that is taught and researched at the college or university level. Disciplines are defined (in part) and recognized by the academic journals in which research is published, and the learned societies and academic departments or faculties to which their practitioners belong.”

 

It appears that for each discipline, its practitioners practice different kinds of research. I'm interested in the research types that exist for each academic and scientific discipline. What are the similarities? How does the practitioner of each discipline validate sources and evaluate the conclusions drawn? How does the practitioner of each field of study and type of research address truth, Truth, value, knowledge, paradigms, and ethics? How does each practitioner address theories, methods, and techniques, for what  purpose?

 

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Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy

Sharrock's insight:

This resource offers incredible levels of depth and exploration of a wide range of concepts. Recently, I have used it to appreciate the complexities of morality and the Turing Test. It occurred to me that there are other concepts that I wish to explore. It could be used as a "jump off point" for major research projects or intellectual blog publishings or any number of uses.

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Revealing India and Pakistan’s Ancient Art and Inventions

Revealing India and Pakistan’s Ancient Art and Inventions | Teacher Tools and Tips | Scoop.it
China, Egypt, Mesopotamia, Maya--these are ancient civilizations people tend to know something about. The Harappan civilization of the Indus Valley, on the other hand, is maybe less well known, but just as fascinating and inspiring for us today.
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Build a Diverse Group of Friends

Build a Diverse Group of Friends | Teacher Tools and Tips | Scoop.it
To grow as a person, it's important to go beyond our "comfort zone" of people and seek relationships with those who are wildly different from us.
Sharrock's insight:

We educators have difficulties expanding our horizons, networking for real professional growth. Maybe this is true for people, in general. After all, the author indicates what almost all of us believe, that “Every single person we choose to associate with brings out a different side of us. Therefore, the more diverse our group of friends is, the more dynamic and flexible we become as an individual.” But the proof is "in the pudding." We don't do this, really. there is even a name for our behavior: the similarity attraction effect. The author provides excellent instruction, "Be interested in people in general. Everyone has their own stories and peculiarities. When you approach everyone with the intent to get to know them and understand them, you’ll often find that most people are pretty damn awesome in their own way."

 

 

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