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Scholarpedia - Scholarpedia

Scholarpedia is a peer-reviewed open-access encyclopedia written and maintained by scholarly experts from around the world. Scholarpedia is inspired by Wikipedia and aims to complement it by providing in-depth scholarly treatments of academic topics.

Scholarpedia and Wikipedia are alike in many respects:

both allow anyone to propose revisions to almost any article
both are "wikis" and use the familiar MediaWiki software designed for Wikipedia
both allow considerable freedom within each article's "Talk" pages
both are committed to the goal of making the world's knowledge freely available to all
Nonetheless, Scholarpedia is best understood by how it is unlike most wikis, differences arising from Scholarpedia's academic origins, goals, and audience. The most significant is Scholarpedia's process of peer-reviewed publication: all articles in Scholarpedia are either in the process of being written by a team of authors, or have already been published and are subject to expert curation.

Prior to publication,

all new articles must first receive sponsorship to validate the identity, authority, and ability of the authors who propose to write it
each article undergoes scholarly peer-review, requiring public approval from at least two scholarly experts
After publication,

articles appear within the Scholarpedia Journal and can be cited like any other scholarly article
the visibility of future revisions to an article is controlled by the article's Curator, usually the article's (most) established expert at time of publication
as soon as any individual's revision to an article is accepted, the individual joins a community of recognized (non-author) article contributors
the team of article contributors may from time to time act in the Curator's stead
when an article curator resigns or is otherwise unable to serve, a new Curator is elected
This hybrid model allows Scholarpedia articles to serve as a bridge between traditional peer-reviewed journals and more dynamic and up-to-date wikis without compromising quality or trustworthiness. It aims to remove the disincentives that discourage academics from participating in online publication and productive discussion on the topics they know best.
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The Thanksgiving Story: The Pilgrims Revisited

The Thanksgiving Story: The Pilgrims Revisited | Teacher Tools and Tips | Scoop.it
Explore resources for exploding myths about the Pilgrims, the Indians, the Mayflower and the First Thanksgiving.
Sharrock's insight:

The Thanksgiving Story: The Pilgrims Revisited

The Internet is full of useful materials for exploding myths about the Pilgrims, the Indians, the Mayflower, and the First Thanksgiving. Whether you teach kindergarten or college, you'll find valuable information and teaching tools on the WWW. This week, Education World explores the best of those online resources.


Another excerpt:

"perhaps the most comprehensive source of information about the Mayflower and its passengers can be found at Caleb Johnson's Mayflower Web Pages. Visitors to this site get a fascinating glimpse of Pilgrim life that's sure to surprise, intrigue, and sometimes shock. Here, you can learn about the Mayflower's physical dimensions; see the ship's passenger and crew lists; find out about the lives of the girls and women aboard ship; read accounts of the Pilgrims' voyage, landing, and settlement of Plymouth; and learn the truth about their relationship with the local Indians. The site contains a first-person account of the First Thanksgiving celebration, a photograph of the Mayflower's original passenger list written by William Bradford, versions of the Pilgrim's Peace Treaty with Massasoit, copies of the Pilgrims' wills and estate inventories, and other documents that provide unique insights into the lives of the Pilgrims. Information about Pilgrim food, clothing, weapons, and games is also provided.


"Additional resources at the site include a Message to Teachers, a link to a page of myths about the Pilgrims and the First Thanksgiving that have been taught in classrooms for generations, an area that allows students to email questions to the site's creator, some slightly scandalous accounts of the personal and criminal history of some Mayflower passengers -- and much, much more. In fact, exploring this site is almost as great an adventure as the one it describes."

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Flies That Do Calculus With Their Wings

Flies That Do Calculus With Their Wings | Teacher Tools and Tips | Scoop.it
Scientists glued tiny magnets to fruit flies to learn about the millisecond aerial ballets required to stay aloft when you’re a tiny insect.
Sharrock's insight:

excerpt: "At Cornell University, for instance, researchers have been investigating how the flies recover when their flight is momentarily disturbed. Among their conclusions: a small group of fly neurons is solving calculus problems, or what for humans are calculus problems."

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ERICDigests.Org - Providing full-text access to ERIC Digests

ERICDigests.Org - Providing full-text access to ERIC Digests | Teacher Tools and Tips | Scoop.it

What are ERIC Digests?

ERIC Digests are: 

- short reports (1,000 - 1,500 words) on topics of prime current interest in education. There are a large variety of topics covered including teaching, learning, libraries, charter schools, special education, higher education, home schooling, and many more.

- targeted specifically for teachers, administrators, policymakers, and other practitioners, but generally useful to the broad educational community. 

- designed to provide an overview of information on a given topic, plus references to items providing more detailed information. 

- produced by the former 16 subject-specialized ERIC Clearinghouses, and reviewed by experts and content specialists in the field. 

- funded by the Office of Educational Research and Improvement (OERI), of the U.S. Department of Education (ED). 

- The full-text ERIC Digest database contains over 3000 Digests with the latest updates being added to this site in July 2005. 

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How Many People Do I Need to Take My Survey? | SurveyMonkey Blog

How Many People Do I Need to Take My Survey? | SurveyMonkey Blog | Teacher Tools and Tips | Scoop.it
Great question! And we’ve got a handy-dandy table with the answers. To use the table, just ask yourself two questions: How many people are in your populati
Sharrock's insight:

Great information! It's probably one of the big ones for schools issuing surveys to their community members and stakeholders. Schools are trying to gather data to address student, family, community needs. We need more advice like this!

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Building a library for Information & Digital Li...

Building a library for Information & Digital Li... | Teacher Tools and Tips | Scoop.it
Building a library for Information & Digital Literacy Skills | Jorum Team Blog on CEET Meet (Oct'2013) Digital Literacy: Critical Thinking, Problem Solving, and Decision Making~Stephanie Samaras curated by Stephanie Samaras (Building a library for...

Via Joyce Valenza
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The Truth About The Left Brain / Right Brain Relationship

The Truth About The Left Brain / Right Brain Relationship | Teacher Tools and Tips | Scoop.it
Are you right-brained or left-brained? Or is the question itself a little harebrained?
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What saying 'I' says about you

What saying 'I' says about you | Teacher Tools and Tips | Scoop.it
Researchers say that your usage of the pronoun 'I' says more about you than you may realize.
Sharrock's insight:

One interesting statement: "Avoiding the first-person pronoun is distancing." I would be interested in the book "The Secret Life of Pronouns" just to find out why people refer to themselves in the third person (techically, using one's name when talking about oneself is not often using a pronoun, but maybe cognitively, it is. 

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Ivon Prefontaine's curator insight, October 10, 2013 12:31 PM

I wonder what it means when the person who overuses "I" has no real authority based on experience?

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Survey shows parent, educator support of Common Core

Survey shows parent, educator support of Common Core | Teacher Tools and Tips | Scoop.it
A national survey conducted by Utah-based School Improvement Network shows a majority of parents and educators support the Common Core State Standards.
Sharrock's insight:

from the article: "On the controversy the Common Core has generated, 70 percent of educators surveyed by School Improvement Network responded that they do not support political efforts to withdraw from the standards and 58 percent believe that common standards between states are necessary"

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Risk of crime in gated communities

Risk of crime in gated communities | Teacher Tools and Tips | Scoop.it
Gated communities are perceived to be safe havens in a world of risk and uncertainty, but new research from the United States challenges received opinion and suggests that, although opportunistic burglaries may be minimized, the risk of other...
Sharrock's insight:

from the article: "Research published this month in the journal Justice Quarterly confirms that homes in gated communities are subjected to fewer burglaries than those in non-gated communities. However, there is evidence that these communities not only push crime to other, less secure, neighbourhoods, but also present an increased risk of other crimes, including "intimate partner violence."


Teachers can help students gain an understanding of the complexity of social issues with this article. Students can research and discuss short term solutions to social issues like poverty, crime, unemployment. The important goal of such discussions may be to explore how simple solutions can/cannot solve big problems. Students need to become productive and informed citizens, wherever they are, by recognizing fallacies, complex issues, and the nature of different types of problems and problem solving. 

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Back to School with Google Docs: Support Research/Writing/ Collaboration

Back to School with Google Docs: Support Research/Writing/ Collaboration | Teacher Tools and Tips | Scoop.it

Via Beth Dichter
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Beth Dichter's curator insight, August 19, 2013 6:24 AM

Are you using Google Docs? This post explores many of the options available to you in Google Docs including:

* Google Docs for Research - Look under Tools to access Research. As well as allowing you to research within Google Docs this tool streamlines " the process of creating hyperlinks and appropriately formatting citations."

* Google Docs for Collaborative Writing - Some of the features of this tool include sharing and commenting, built-in dictionary, smart spell check and grammar check, one click footnotes and citations, Easy Bib connection and revision history.

The Common Core stresses the need for students to collaborate. Google Docs may assist your students in the process. The post also contains quite a few screenshots.

BI Media Specialists's curator insight, August 19, 2013 3:10 PM

Looks like an easy and interesting way to promote good research skills in the classroom!

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Let's eat cake! Luxury unwrapped

Let's eat cake! Luxury unwrapped | Teacher Tools and Tips | Scoop.it
Alice Blackhurst is one of six Cambridge PhD candidates to take part in a series of podcast interviews offering an insight into graduate research in the arts, humanities and social sciences. Her work focuses on ideas of luxury.
Sharrock's insight:

An exploration of the concept of "luxury" in the past and in our times. 

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The Us vs. Them Mentality: How Group Thinking Can Irrationally Divide Us

The Us vs. Them Mentality: How Group Thinking Can Irrationally Divide Us | Teacher Tools and Tips | Scoop.it
Studies show that thinking of ourselves in terms of groups automatically leads to a kind of irrational group favoritism, which ends up dividing society, instead of bringing us together.
Sharrock's insight:

This article is helpful in fighting our tendencies toward thinking in polarities (us/them, this/that, choice #1 vs. choice #2, etc.). We are more complex and complicated than these either/or set ups. And problems are often more complex or complicated than the questions often posed in this way. 

 

The concept photo does something interesting with the colors red and blue. In the United States, there are the Blue States and the Red States, layer that with the angel for blue and the devil for red. It works on two levels.

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Using Humor in the Classroom

Using Humor in the Classroom | Teacher Tools and Tips | Scoop.it
Edutopia blogger Maurice Elias explains how laughter can reduce stress and offers a handful of teaching activities to lighten up the learning.

Via Becky Roehrs
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Becky Roehrs's curator insight, March 30, 9:10 PM

Check out the Article comments too, teachers have posted jokes and suggestions, too.

Jan Vandermeer's curator insight, April 1, 7:09 AM

I believe that humour activates new parts of the brain and helps everyone to make unexpected connections, creates agile minds and makes learning fun!

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Teaching Metacognition: How Students Think Is Key To High Achievement

Teaching Metacognition: How Students Think Is Key To High Achievement | Teacher Tools and Tips | Scoop.it

"A few years ago, I came across some interesting research by cognitive psychologist Ronald T. Kellogg. He claimed that the mark of an expert writer is not years of practice or a hefty vocabulary, but rather an awareness of one’s audience. This made sense to me, and I wondered if it were true in other disciplines as well."


Via Beth Dichter, Agisa Abdulla, Ivon Prefontaine
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Joy Power's curator insight, October 9, 2014 9:21 AM

Important research on learning for achievement.

María Dolores Díaz Noguera's curator insight, October 9, 2014 3:53 PM

Teaching Metacognition: How Students Think Is Key To High Achievement

Becky Roehrs's curator insight, October 13, 2014 9:51 PM

Research about how self-awareness can help you tap your learning potential

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Study: Art Museums Foster Appreciation for Ambiguity

Study: Art Museums Foster Appreciation for Ambiguity | Teacher Tools and Tips | Scoop.it
New research from Vienna finds viewing artworks in a museum enhances the aesthetic experience.
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ERIC - Frequently Asked Questions

ERIC is an online library of education research and information, sponsored by the Institute of Education Sciences (IES) of the U.S. Department of Education.
Sharrock's insight:

From the page: "What journals are indexed in ERIC?

The list of currently approved journals can be found at: http://eric.ed.gov/?journals and the approved list of non-journal sources can be found at http://eric.ed.gov/?nonjournals

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Theories of Intelligence

Perkins' book contains extensive research-based evidence that education can be considerably improved by more explicit and appropriate teaching for transfer, focusing on higher-order cognitive skills, and the use of project-based learning.

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Robert Fisher Teaching Thinking homepage

This article explores what metacognition is, why it is important and how it develops in children. It argues that teachers need to help children develop metacognitive awareness, and identifies the factors which enhance metacognitive development. Metacognitive thinking is a key element in the transfer of learning. The child's development of metacognitive skills is defined as meta-learning. Meta-teaching strategies can help mediate the metacognitive skills of children, help to stimilate children's metacognitive thinking. The article draws upon reserch currently being undertaken in London schools on raising achievement in thinking and learning through developing the metacognition of children as learners in schools.


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Ivon Prefontaine's curator insight, December 13, 2013 11:51 AM

This looks like an interesting article.

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109 Common Core Resources For Teachers By Category

109 Common Core Resources For Teachers By Category | Teacher Tools and Tips | Scoop.it
109 Common Core Resources For Teachers By Category

 

The transition to the Common Core Standards is likely the single most significant change in the last 10 years in American public education.

While the English-Language Arts and Math haven’t changed, what the standards say about those content areas–and their relative complexity and rigor–are indeed different.

In a recent survey, you let us know you wanted more Common Core resources and support, so we’re going to ramp up our Common Core resources over the summer of 2013, including this list of various Common Core resources, separated by content area.

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How people argue with research they don’t like

How people argue with research they don’t like | Teacher Tools and Tips | Scoop.it
If you ever need to rebut a study whose conclusion you don't like, just follow this simple flowchart.
Sharrock's insight:

Great responses. Great flowchart. 

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Yelling At Kids Could Be Just As Harmful As Physical Discipline, Study Suggests - Huffington Post

Yelling At Kids Could Be Just As Harmful As Physical Discipline, Study Suggests - Huffington Post | Teacher Tools and Tips | Scoop.it
Yelling At Kids Could Be Just As Harmful As Physical Discipline, Study Suggests
Huffington Post
Sticks and stones indeed break bones -- but words can cause real harm to kids, too, a new study says.
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Lynnette Van Dyke's curator insight, September 8, 2013 8:00 PM

"Harsh verbal discipline" on the part of a parent increases a child’s risk for depression and aggressive behavior, and is "not uncommon," according to the research, which was published online earlier this week in Child Development. The disciplinary techniques in question include yelling, cursing and humiliation -- defined as "calling the child dumb, lazy, or something similar."

The study even suggests that verbal reprimands can have the same impact on children as physical punishment: "the negative effects of verbal discipline within the two-year period of [the] study were comparable to the effects shown over the same period of time in other studies that focused on physical discipline," a press release from the University of Pittsburgh, where the study's lead author is an assistant professor, explains.

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CENTRE FOR RESEARCH ON YOUTH AT RISK

CENTRE FOR RESEARCH ON YOUTH AT RISK | Teacher Tools and Tips | Scoop.it
Sharrock's insight:

from the webpage: "While there has been a fair amount of work done on identifying risk factors that, if present, may increase the likelihood of a young person's involvement in crime or other negative behaviour problems, there has also been some work done on the development of programs that build on the enhancement of protective factors which may reduce the effects of exposure to risk factors and thus lower the chances a youth will develop serious anti-social or other behaviour problems or become a victim.."

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The different kinds of research develops different kinds of knowledge

"Research and experimental development (R&D) comprise creative work undertaken on a systematic basis in order to increase the stock of knowledge, including knowledge of man, culture and society, and the use of this stock of knowledge to devise new applications." (OECD (2002) Frascati Manual: proposed standard practice for surveys on research and experimental development, 6th edition.)[1] It is used to establish or confirm facts, reaffirm the results of previous work, solve new or existing problems, support theorems, or develop new theories. A research project may also be an expansion on past work in the field. To test the validity of instruments, procedures, or experiments, research may replicate elements of prior projects, or the project as a whole. The primary purposes of basic research (as opposed to applied research) are documentation, discovery, interpretation, or the research and development of methods and systems for the advancement of human knowledge. Approaches to research depend on epistemologies, which vary considerably both within and between humanities and sciences. There are several forms of research: scientific, humanities, artistic, economic, social, business, marketing, practitioner research, etc.

Scientific research relies on the application of the scientific method, a harnessing of curiosity. This research provides scientific information and theories for the explanation of the nature and the properties of the world. It makes practical applications possible. Scientific research is funded by public authorities, by charitable organizations and by private groups, including many companies. Scientific research can be subdivided into different classifications according to their academic and application disciplines. Scientific research is a widely used criterion for judging the standing of an academic institution, such as business schools, but some argue that such is an inaccurate assessment of the institution, because the quality of research does not tell about the quality of teaching (these do not necessarily correlate totally).[2]

Research in the humanities involves different methods such as for example hermeneutics and semiotics, and a different, more relativist epistemology. Humanities scholars usually do not search for the ultimate correct answer to a question, but instead explore the issues and details that surround it. Context is always important, and context can be social, historical, political, cultural or ethnic. An example of research in the humanities is historical research, which is embodied in historical method. Historians use primary sources and other evidence to systematically investigate a topic, and then to write histories in the form of accounts of the past.

Sharrock's insight:

There is a long list of academic disciplines (fields of study). And the list keeps growing. “An academic discipline, or field of study, is a branch of knowledge that is taught and researched at the college or university level. Disciplines are defined (in part) and recognized by the academic journals in which research is published, and the learned societies and academic departments or faculties to which their practitioners belong.”

 

It appears that for each discipline, its practitioners practice different kinds of research. I'm interested in the research types that exist for each academic and scientific discipline. What are the similarities? How does the practitioner of each discipline validate sources and evaluate the conclusions drawn? How does the practitioner of each field of study and type of research address truth, Truth, value, knowledge, paradigms, and ethics? How does each practitioner address theories, methods, and techniques, for what  purpose?

 

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Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy

Sharrock's insight:

This resource offers incredible levels of depth and exploration of a wide range of concepts. Recently, I have used it to appreciate the complexities of morality and the Turing Test. It occurred to me that there are other concepts that I wish to explore. It could be used as a "jump off point" for major research projects or intellectual blog publishings or any number of uses.

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