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Help Your Students Develop Critical Thinking Skills Infographic

Help Your Students Develop Critical Thinking Skills Infographic | Teacher Tools and Tips | Scoop.it
The Help Your Students Develop Critical Thinking Skills Infographic presents the 7 stages of critical thinking to turn your students into critical thinkers.

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Maree Whiteley's curator insight, February 27, 6:09 AM

Great visual for every classroom of critical thinkers and inquiry learners...

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Reading Sage: Webb's Depth of Knowledge (DOK) | Bloom's Taxonomy vs. Norman Webb's depth of knowledge

The Common Core Standards are the cornerstones of the Smarter Balanced and PARCC assessments, Webb’s Depth of Knowledge (scale of cognitive demand) and Blooms Revised Taxonomy (levels of intellectual ability) are the framework and the structures that will be used to evaluate students. Assessing curriculum, developing formative assessments, evaluation curriculum, and evaluation of students knowledge at the highest levels is being shared by two progressive cognitive matrices. Depth of knowledge, and complexity of knowledge is the heart of the more rigorous assessments being implemented in 2014. They share many ideas and concepts yet are different in level of cognitive demand, level of difficulty, complexity of verbs vs. depth of thinking required, and the scale of cognitive demand. Teachers need to learn how the frameworks are used to develop curriculum and how to use them to enhance instructions. Teachers and students can use Blooms Questions Stems and Webb’s DOK questions stems to create higher order thinking and improve achievement. 80% of the PARCC assessments will be based on the highest levels of blooms and the deepest levels of Webb’s DOK. Are you ready to use the DOK or Blooms daily in your class? 

 The links below are a great resources of Blooms Taxonomy and Webb’s Depth of Knowledge.Levels of Thinking in Bloom’s Taxonomy and Webb’s Depth of KnowledgeHess’ Cognitive Rigor Matrix & Curricular Examples | Revised Bloom’s Taxonomy | Webb’s Depth of Knowledge GuideDepth of Knowledge: Assessing Curriculum with Depth and MeaningBlooms and Webb ComparisonDepth of Knowledge ConsistencyDeveloping Higher Order Thinking Questions Based on Webb’s DOK andFCAT Content ComplexityPARCC Transition Information: AIMS Test and Common CoreDOK Question StemsDepth of Knowledge (DOK) LevelsINTRODUCTION TO WEBB’S DEPTH-OF-KNOWLEDGE LEVELSMathematics Depth-of-Knowledge LevelsDepth-of-Knowledge Levels for Four Content Areas

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Sharrock's curator insight, November 19, 2013 3:37 PM

Links are useful as well as the exploration.

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About | Open Knowledge Foundation

Opening Knowledge for Everyone

 

The Open Knowledge Foundation (OKF) is a non-profit organisation founded in 2004 and dedicated to promoting open data and open content in all their forms – including government data, publicly funded research and public domain cultural content.

- See more at: http://okfn.org/about/#sthash.t0VpjSDt.dpuf

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Nexum reports in http://www.slaw.ca/2013/10/18/less-serious-legal-research/: ; "In addition to necessary and unnecessary complexity and jargon, there is one more reason why legal documents are boring: they are exclusively textual which is not as fun and self-explanatory as graphics and images. The power of visual communication has long been exploited by other “boring” disciplines. The field of open data often emerges as a naturalplayground for visual applications. Visualization experiments are not recent at all as witnesses this article from 2007. Some readers may even remember data visualization efforts dating back to the nineties."

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How to Become an Expert at Anything

How to Become an Expert at Anything | Teacher Tools and Tips | Scoop.it
How to become an expert by doing your own research, communicating with like-minded people, engaging with other experts, reading academic articles, putting your knowledge to action, and cultivating an attitude to never stop learning new things.
Sharrock's insight:

From the article: Two types of #knowledge: "explicit knowledge, such as from reading a book or listening to a lecture."

 

and

 

"However, there is a whole other realm of knowledge that you can only learn through action and practice known as tacit knowledge.

 

A good example of tacit knowledge is riding a bike. You can read books or talk to others about it all day, but you won’t really be able to learn it until you get on the bike, try to pedal and balance yourself, fall down, get back up, continue to practice, and eventually “feel” what it’s like to actually ride a bike until it becomes second-nature."

 

 

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Sensemaking artifacts « Connectivism

Sensemaking artifacts « Connectivism | Teacher Tools and Tips | Scoop.it

"Through joint processes of sensemaking and wayfinding – see presentation below – learners begin exploring and negotiating the domain of knowledge. In the process, they produce artifacts, such as the images posted above. Artifacts can include a blog post, an image, a video, a podcast, a live performance – basically anything that allows an individual to express how they’ve come to understand something."


Via Howard Rheingold
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Howard Rheingold's curator insight, August 2, 2013 1:40 PM

As an educator who tries to use social media in conjunction with student-centered, collaborative, inquiry-based pedagogy, I'm interested in collective sensemaking -- which also happens to be an essential non-technological element of collective intelligence. George Siemens, who was one of the creators of the first MOOCs, wrote this insightful piece about the digital artifacts that individuals use in concert with others in the collective sensemaking involved in learning. It applies to collective intelligence as well.

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Scaffolding for Deep Understanding

Scaffolding for Deep Understanding | Teacher Tools and Tips | Scoop.it
How do we help novice learners become more expert? Peter Skillen uses collaborative journal writing environments to move kids beyond social talk into deeper thinking.
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What Is It to Be Intellectually Humble?

What Is It to Be Intellectually Humble? | Teacher Tools and Tips | Scoop.it

 "Knowledge comes into us through a variety of channels that can be blocked by our concern for status, and the successful knowledge-seeker will be one who keeps those channels open. The process requires that we be able to “listen,” either literally or figuratively, to what others say. If what they say shows them to be superior to us in knowledge, we will be hampered in our learning if our first reaction is to try to show that we know as much as they or more. The process also requires that we be corrigible, that we be open to the possibility that our opinions are in some way misguided. If, whenever our status as knowers is threatened by the specter of correction, we feel that we must prove ourselves to have been in the right, we will have closed off an avenue of knowledge and crippled ourselves as inquirers. It can be particularly galling, if one lacks intellectual humility, to be corrected in a public forum; and the galling can obstruct the process of learning."

 

Sharrock's insight:

from the article: "A lovely example of intellectual humility comes from Alice Ambrose in a report of experiences she had in the classroom of G. E. Moore, the prominent philosopher, at Cambridge University. She reports that in a series of lectures on the concept of truth Moore would sometimes criticize claims that he himself had made, say in an earlier lecture, with the same attitude one would take “to an anonymous philosopher whose mistakes called for correction.” Also, he would sometimes announce that he was going to skip to another stage in the argument because he did not know how to make the transition logically. Moore seemed to be unconcerned about protecting his status as an important professor at Cambridge because he was so deeply concerned with getting at the truth about truth. His love of knowledge swamped his concern for status, and this intellectual humility made him one of the greater philosophers of the 20th century."

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Shifting to 21st Century Thinking » The Knowledge Age

Knowledge’s meaning is changing. Knowledge is no longer being thought of as ‘stuff’ that is developed (and stored) in the minds of experts, represented in books, and classified into disciplines. Instead, it is now thought of as being like a form of energy, as a system of networks and flows – something that doesthings, or makes things happen. Knowledge Age knowledge is defined—and valued—not for what it is, but for what it can do. It is produced, not by individual experts, but by ‘collectivising intelligence’ – that is, groups of people with complementary expertise who collaborate for specific purposes. These changes have major implications for our education system.

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Margarida Sá Costa's curator insight, November 19, 2013 11:38 AM

"Knowledge’s meaning is changing. it is now thought of as being like a form of energy, as a system of networks and flows – something that doesthings, or makes things happen. Knowledge Age knowledge is defined—and valued—not for what it is, but for what it can do. It is produced, not by individual experts, but by ‘collectivising intelligence’ – that is, groups of people with complementary expertise who collaborate for specific purposes. These changes have major implications for our education system."

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The End Of The Scale Economy

The End Of The Scale Economy | Teacher Tools and Tips | Scoop.it
Bigger isn't really better anymore. To compete in the new economy, we need a new playbook.

 

from the article: "Clearly, digital technology has enabled a new semantic economy where access and scale have been decoupled.  When access is universal, or nearly so, size doesn’t really matter."

Sharrock's insight:

For teachers of economics, business-related topics, and US government, this be interesting. What does this mean for economic empire building? How do you view simulations and new ways to organize an organization? With changes in education, there are also changes in how business organizations process information and decision making. But what does this mean in terms of skills that students need to develop? What does this mean for daily operations? What is work?

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The different kinds of research develops different kinds of knowledge

"Research and experimental development (R&D) comprise creative work undertaken on a systematic basis in order to increase the stock of knowledge, including knowledge of man, culture and society, and the use of this stock of knowledge to devise new applications." (OECD (2002) Frascati Manual: proposed standard practice for surveys on research and experimental development, 6th edition.)[1] It is used to establish or confirm facts, reaffirm the results of previous work, solve new or existing problems, support theorems, or develop new theories. A research project may also be an expansion on past work in the field. To test the validity of instruments, procedures, or experiments, research may replicate elements of prior projects, or the project as a whole. The primary purposes of basic research (as opposed to applied research) are documentation, discovery, interpretation, or the research and development of methods and systems for the advancement of human knowledge. Approaches to research depend on epistemologies, which vary considerably both within and between humanities and sciences. There are several forms of research: scientific, humanities, artistic, economic, social, business, marketing, practitioner research, etc.

Scientific research relies on the application of the scientific method, a harnessing of curiosity. This research provides scientific information and theories for the explanation of the nature and the properties of the world. It makes practical applications possible. Scientific research is funded by public authorities, by charitable organizations and by private groups, including many companies. Scientific research can be subdivided into different classifications according to their academic and application disciplines. Scientific research is a widely used criterion for judging the standing of an academic institution, such as business schools, but some argue that such is an inaccurate assessment of the institution, because the quality of research does not tell about the quality of teaching (these do not necessarily correlate totally).[2]

Research in the humanities involves different methods such as for example hermeneutics and semiotics, and a different, more relativist epistemology. Humanities scholars usually do not search for the ultimate correct answer to a question, but instead explore the issues and details that surround it. Context is always important, and context can be social, historical, political, cultural or ethnic. An example of research in the humanities is historical research, which is embodied in historical method. Historians use primary sources and other evidence to systematically investigate a topic, and then to write histories in the form of accounts of the past.

Sharrock's insight:

There is a long list of academic disciplines (fields of study). And the list keeps growing. “An academic discipline, or field of study, is a branch of knowledge that is taught and researched at the college or university level. Disciplines are defined (in part) and recognized by the academic journals in which research is published, and the learned societies and academic departments or faculties to which their practitioners belong.”

 

It appears that for each discipline, its practitioners practice different kinds of research. I'm interested in the research types that exist for each academic and scientific discipline. What are the similarities? How does the practitioner of each discipline validate sources and evaluate the conclusions drawn? How does the practitioner of each field of study and type of research address truth, Truth, value, knowledge, paradigms, and ethics? How does each practitioner address theories, methods, and techniques, for what  purpose?

 

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Semantic Conceptions of Information (Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy)

Semantic Conceptions of Information (Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy) | Teacher Tools and Tips | Scoop.it
Sharrock's insight:

Information defined. Sort of. This may become important depending on the person you are speaking to or the document you are referencing/reviewing. 

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