Teacher Tools and Tips
2.8K views | +0 today
Follow
Teacher Tools and Tips
Tools, tips and practices to share with teachers
Curated by Sharrock
Your new post is loading...
Your new post is loading...
Scooped by Sharrock
Scoop.it!

Slice, Dice, Chop Or Julienne: Does The Cut Change The Flavor?

Slice, Dice, Chop Or Julienne: Does The Cut Change The Flavor? | Teacher Tools and Tips | Scoop.it
When it comes to produce, the answer is yes, experts tell us. But the reasons are complicated — and sometimes mysterious even to restaurant critics, chefs and food scientists.
Sharrock's insight:
surface area and chemical reactions can be valuable to chemistry teachers and to teachers of basic science. 
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Sharrock
Scoop.it!

Physics and Green Beer Bottles

Physics and Green Beer Bottles | Teacher Tools and Tips | Scoop.it
I was confused. Most of these green-bottle beers have a similar taste. But what about clear glass beer? Newcastle doesn’t taste like this? What about Bud Select 55? I am not ashamed to say that I also drink that beer. It is perfect for tailgating at a football game or sitting by the pool. But it doesn’t have that same taste of a green-bottle beer.

Here is my brother’s reply to this question (Eric Allain):

“Certain light sensitive compounds present in hops are the culprit of the skunky aroma which lead to the production of 3-methyl-2-butene-1-thiol (MBT). MBT has an extremely low flavor threshold and is very similar to the compound produced by skunks for defense.

Amber bottles block much of the wavelengths of light (~300-500nm) that lead to this photoxidation but green and clear bottles do not.

Corona IS skunky … this is why they serve it often with a lime to mask the smell. Also, the ‘skunkiness’ has become accepted in Corona as just part of the flavor.

Some of the macrobrew companies (Miller-Coors etc) use a hop extract that has been stabilized so that light will not lead to MBT production. Therefore they can use clear bottles without worry.

Since the MBT is derived from hop components, different beers with different amounts or types of hops may lead to varying levels of light induced MBT.

Boosh!”
Sharrock's insight:
This is an experiment some secondary chemistry teachers might try to reproduce on a weekend or over the summer break. It's also a great reminder that science is fun! What are some ways you might improve the information quality of this experiment? 
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Sharrock
Scoop.it!

The Attack on Truth

The Attack on Truth | Teacher Tools and Tips | Scoop.it
We are entering an age of willful ignorance.

 

Anyone who has been paying attention to the fault lines of academic debate for the past 20 years already knows that the "science wars" were fought by natural scientists (and their defenders in the philosophy of science) on the one side and literary critics and cultural-studies folks on the other. The latter argued that even in the natural realm, truth is relative, and there is no such thing as objectivity. The skirmishes blew up in the well-known "Sokal affair" in 1996, in which a prominent physicist created a scientifically absurd postmodernist paper and was able to get it published in a leading cultural-studies journal. The ridicule that followed may have seemed to settle the matter once and for all.

 
Sharrock's insight:

"when we choose to insulate ourselves from new ideas or evidence because we think that we already know what is true, that is when we are most likely to believe a falsehood. It is not mere disbelief that explains why truth is so often disrespected. It is one’s attitude." (excerpt)

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Sharrock
Scoop.it!

Lab-Grown Retina from Stem Cells Responds to Light

Lab-Grown Retina from Stem Cells Responds to Light | Teacher Tools and Tips | Scoop.it

Researchers at Johns Hopkins pulled it off, they reported in a paper published recently in Nature Communications. They cultivated a three-dimensional complement of retinal tissue, including functioning photoreceptor cells that responded to light, from induced pluripotent stem cells.

“We have basically created a miniature human retina in a dish that not only has the architectural organization of the retina but also has the ability to sense light,” said Valeria Canto-Soler, the senior author and an assistant professor of ophthalmology at Johns Hopkins medical school.

more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Sharrock from Best
Scoop.it!

40 Sites for Free and Quality Science Learning Games

40 Sites for Free and Quality Science Learning Games | Teacher Tools and Tips | Scoop.it
Digital educational games, interactives, virtual labs are excellent resources to assist learning and raising interests for inquiry or investigation. To visualize concepts or to do experiments on computers are cost-effective and efficient. Some games even use role-playing techniques or story lines. Some games create a virtual journey which is impossible to have in real world. We just featured Zombie Plague recently and thought we should give a review on all those quality sources of science learning games. Most sites are from education institutions, non-profit organizations or sponsored by grants, they are free to play. (Simulations are not included in this post, we’ll try to make another post for them)

Games for kids of all ages are listed. A great resource to help students explore science.


Via Beth Dichter, Dr. Stefan Gruenwald
more...
Cynthia Mosley's curator insight, June 30, 2015 6:20 PM

This site provides digital educational games that provides visual concepts along with experiment activities.

Scooped by Sharrock
Scoop.it!

Why Bill Nye Debated Creationist Ken Ham

Why Bill Nye Debated Creationist Ken Ham | Teacher Tools and Tips | Scoop.it
How to watch the debate and why scientists are mad.
Sharrock's insight:

bingo cards...

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Sharrock
Scoop.it!

Six Shades of True

Six Shades of True | Teacher Tools and Tips | Scoop.it
Our word true is one of the oldest in the language. It may derive from a Proto-Indo-European word for tree. A well-rooted tree is strong, steadfast and firm.
Sharrock's insight:

There are different meaning to the word "true".  

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Sharrock
Scoop.it!

Reproducibility: The risks of the replication drive

Reproducibility: The risks of the replication drive | Teacher Tools and Tips | Scoop.it
The push to replicate findings could shelve promising research and unfairly damage the reputations of careful, meticulous scientists, says Mina Bissell.
Sharrock's insight:

Reproducibility is bit more complicated: "People trying to repeat others' research often do not have the time, funding or resources to gain the same expertise with the experimental protocol as the original authors, who were perhaps operating under a multi-year federal grant and aiming for a high-profile publication. If a researcher spends six months, say, trying to replicate such work and reports that it is irreproducible, that can deter other scientists from pursuing a promising line of research, jeopardize the original scientists' chances of obtaining funding to continue it themselves, and potentially damage their reputations." 


the author describes some very important points about training and learning to execute experiments. It's mainly about time, funding, and skills. 

more...
Ana Sanchez's curator insight, April 24, 2014 9:40 AM

Are there risks in replicating others' findings? See the other side of the coin of an ongoing debate in the scientific community.

Scooped by Sharrock
Scoop.it!

Kinds of Minds | KurzweilAI

Kinds of Minds | KurzweilAI | Teacher Tools and Tips | Scoop.it
In Beyond AI, published today, J. Storrs Hall offers a must-read for anyone interested in the future of the human-machine civilization, says Ray Kurzweil.
Sharrock's insight:

Reads like science fiction, but if you read closely, you see that this is also an activity around vocabulary building. Focus on the prefixes of the words to build new words relating to artificial intelligence classifications. Students might find this interesting as well as informative. I'm thinking it would support ELA standards in the common core http://www.corestandards.org/ELA-Literacy/CCRA/L. ;

 

more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Sharrock from Amazing Science
Scoop.it!

Researchers claim to have solved the Mpemba effect - why warm water freezes faster than cooler water

Researchers claim to have solved the Mpemba effect - why warm water freezes faster than cooler water | Teacher Tools and Tips | Scoop.it

team of researchers at Singapore's Nanyang Technological University believes they have solved the mystery of why warm water freezes faster than cooler water. It has to do with the way energy is stored in the hydrogen bonds between water molecules they suggest in their paper which they've uploaded to the preprint server arXiv.

The researchers demonstrate that the Mpemba paradox arises intrinsically from the release rate of energy initially stored in the covalent H-O part of the O:H-O bond in water albeit experimental conditions. Generally, heating raises the energy of a substance by lengthening and softening all bonds involved. However, the O:H nonbond in water follows actively the general rule of thermal expansion and drives the H-O covalent bond to relax oppositely in length and energy because of the inter-electron-electron pair coupling [J Phys Chem Lett 4, 2565 (2013); ibid 4, 3238 (2013)].

 

Heating stores energy into the H-O bond by shortening and stiffening it. Cooling the water as the source in a refrigerator as a drain, the H-O bond releases its energy at a rate that depends exponentially on the initially storage of energy, and therefore, Mpemba effect happens.

 

This effect is formulated in terms of the relaxation time tau to represent all possible processes of energy loss. Consistency between predictions and measurements revealed that the tau drops exponentially intrinsically with the initial temperature of the water being cooled.


Via Dr. Stefan Gruenwald
Sharrock's insight:

Something as simple as water has mysteries. Kids can be amazed with the paradoxes and uniqueness of water's properties.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Sharrock
Scoop.it!

How Inquiry-Based Learning Works With STEM - Edudemic

How Inquiry-Based Learning Works With STEM - Edudemic | Teacher Tools and Tips | Scoop.it
Learning through inquiry is not a new concept - at all. Much of the more general life- learning that we do as humans is based on inquiry.
Sharrock's insight:

This might make a motivational poster for secondary school science classrooms and for elementary school classrooms. Students and teachers need these reminders.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Sharrock
Scoop.it!

The Hottest Place on Earth

Explores the question: The Hottest Place on Earth.

Sharrock's insight:

This video explores the question of measuring heat, observing remote places on Earth, and satellites. It supports critical thinking, but also explores issues connected with answering simple questions.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Sharrock
Scoop.it!

The Science Behind Honey’s Eternal Shelf Life

The Science Behind Honey’s Eternal Shelf Life | Teacher Tools and Tips | Scoop.it
A slew of factors--its acidity, its lack of water and even the presence of hydrogen peroxide--work in perfect harmony, allowing the sticky treat to last forever
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Sharrock
Scoop.it!

How Your Brain Keeps You Believing Crap That Isn't True

How Your Brain Keeps You Believing Crap That Isn't True | Teacher Tools and Tips | Scoop.it
we’re tricked by false truths—things we think are true but aren’t. Drinking eight glasses of water a day seems like a good idea, but it doesn’t do a bit of good for your health. Many people believe that Napoleon was short, but there’s good reason to believe he was actually a bit taller than the average Frenchman of his day. Reducing salt intake has never been shown to prevent heart attacks or strokes, and there’s no such thing as an allergy to MSG.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Sharrock
Scoop.it!

Science fairs aren’t actually preparing your kids to do anything

Wilkins believes that school science fairs, as they are conducted today, aren’t the great learning experiences that they are meant to be. “It’s hard for them [the kids] to really figure out what is realistically doable, what projects will give you good hard data, what project won’t make the kids and parents crazy!”
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Sharrock
Scoop.it!

26 Glorious Things America Gave the World - Science Infographic - e-Learning Infographics

26 Glorious Things America Gave the World - Science Infographic - e-Learning Infographics | Teacher Tools and Tips | Scoop.it

SomethingThe 26 Glorious Things America Gave the World - Science Infographic Infographic demonstrates one of America’s most important strengths.

Sharrock's insight:

Something to share from middles school and high shcool social studies and the science classes. Some of the "things" given might not be conventionally used though. You might want to prepare a brief inquiry-based activity attached to exploring the relevance of these "things" in the real world.

more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Sharrock from Eclectic Technology
Scoop.it!

Science is Fun - Ideas & Resources for Hands-on Science Lessons

Science is Fun - Ideas & Resources for Hands-on Science Lessons | Teacher Tools and Tips | Scoop.it

"Throughout middle school and high school conducting lab experiments was my favorite part of every science class that I took. There was something about the hands-on aspect of science labs that always got me excited about learning."


Via Beth Dichter
more...
Beth Dichter's curator insight, April 29, 2014 9:50 PM

Richard Byrne provides a number of links to websites that have great hands-on activities for students to learn science. The sites include:

* Science is Fun - 25 chemistry experiments geared to students in grades 4 - 9

* Museum of Science and Industry in Chicago has activities in twelve topics. You will find experiments for students preK through grade 12.

* Discover the World is from NOAA. A total of 43 experiments which are probably best for grades 4 - 8.

* Squishy Circuits. Learn how to create the "dough" to create these circuits and watch a TedEd to learn more.

There are many ideas to be found in this post and lots of fun for your students to experience while they explore and learn science!

Scooped by Sharrock
Scoop.it!

WATCH: Why You Need Anger Will Surprise You

WATCH: Why You Need Anger Will Surprise You | Teacher Tools and Tips | Scoop.it
Why do we get angry?

It turns out that anger is an essential human emotion. Dr. Aaron Sell, an anger researcher at the University of California, Santa Barbara's Center for Evolutionary Psychology, told HuffPost Science in an email, "We evolv...
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Sharrock from School Leadership, Leadership, in General, Tools and Resources, Advice and humor
Scoop.it!

▶ Is Punishment or Reward More Effective? - YouTube

 

 

The psychologist Daniel Kahneman, winner of the 2002 Nobel prize in economics, pointed out that regression to the mean might explain why rebukes can seem to improve performance, while praise seems to backfire.[8] http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Regression_toward_the_mean

 

 

I had the most satisfying Eureka experience of my career while attempting to teach flight instructors that praise is more effective than punishment for promoting skill-learning. When I had finished my enthusiastic speech, one of the most seasoned instructors in the audience raised his hand and made his own short speech, which began by conceding that positive reinforcement might be good for the birds, but went on to deny that it was optimal for flight cadets. He said, “On many occasions I have praised flight cadets for clean execution of some aerobatic maneuver, and in general when they try it again, they do worse. On the other hand, I have often screamed at cadets for bad execution, and in general they do better the next time. So please don’t tell us that reinforcement works and punishment does not, because the opposite is the case.” This was a joyous moment, in which I understood an important truth about the world: because we tend to reward others when they do well and punish them when they do badly, and because there is regression to the mean, it is part of the human condition that we are statistically punished for rewarding others and rewarded for punishing them. I immediately arranged a demonstration in which each participant tossed two coins at a target behind his back, without any feedback. We measured the distances from the target and could see that those who had done best the first time had mostly deteriorated on their second try, and vice versa. But I knew that this demonstration would not undo the effects of lifelong exposure to a perverse contingency.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Regression_toward_the_mean

Sharrock's insight:

Why do people resist research findings from areas like leadership, education, parenting, and other areas related to psychology and sociology? One reason may result from the confusion between the use and value of controlled experiments and the value of anecdotal evidence. 

 
more...
Sharrock's curator insight, January 11, 2014 4:49 PM

Why do people resist research findings from areas like leadership, education, parenting, and other areas related to psychology and sociology? One reason may result from the confusion between the use and value of controlled experiments and the value of anecdotal evidence. 

 

Sharrock's curator insight, January 11, 2014 4:50 PM

Why do people resist research findings from areas like leadership, education, parenting, and other areas related to psychology and sociology? One reason may result from the confusion between the use and value of controlled experiments and the value of anecdotal evidence. 

 
Sharrock's curator insight, January 11, 2014 4:51 PM

Why do people resist research findings from areas like leadership, education, parenting, and other areas related to psychology and sociology? One reason may result from the confusion between the use and value of controlled experiments and the value of anecdotal evidence. 

 
Scooped by Sharrock
Scoop.it!

Carl Sagan: ‘Science Is a Way of Thinking’

Carl Sagan: ‘Science Is a Way of Thinking’ | Teacher Tools and Tips | Scoop.it
In this 1996 interview, Carl Sagan talks about pseudoscience, UFOs, and the origins of the universe.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Sharrock
Scoop.it!

Cool gravity visualization

Cool gravity visualization | Teacher Tools and Tips | Scoop.it

Using a large piece of spandex (representing spacetime) and some balls and marbles (representing masses), a high school science teacher explains how gravity works.


The bits about how the planets all orbit in the same direction and the demo of the Earth/Moon orbit are really neat. And you can stop watching around the 7-minute mark...the demos end around then.


Sharrock's insight:

For science teachers and for those using the common core. Whenever something is not clearly "common core", never forget that writing about observations, describing them, and noting connections, are important for developing deeper learning.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Sharrock
Scoop.it!

10 Scientific Blunders That Could Shake Your Faith in Science - The Epoch Times

10 Scientific Blunders That Could Shake Your Faith in Science - The Epoch Times | Teacher Tools and Tips | Scoop.it
The history of science teaches us to question what we think we know. Some scientists who made great discoveries in history were ridiculed and dismissed. Some scientific "facts" have been proven false.
Sharrock's insight:

this could generate a discussion about science, the scientific method, and politics. this article's title seems to have an agenda as well. 

more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Sharrock from Statistics in the News
Scoop.it!

DATING FOR BAYESIANS: Here's How To Use Statistics To Improve Your Love ... - Business Insider

DATING FOR BAYESIANS: Here's How To Use Statistics To Improve Your Love ... - Business Insider | Teacher Tools and Tips | Scoop.it
Business Insider
DATING FOR BAYESIANS: Here's How To Use Statistics To Improve Your Love ...
Business Insider
I am a somewhat socially awkward person. This sometimes makes first dates a daunting proposition.

Via Bill Bentley
Sharrock's insight:

At last, statistics that might interest teenagers!

more...
Bill Bentley's curator insight, November 6, 2013 8:47 AM

For all you dating folks, regardless of your age, here is one good reason why you need to study statistics!  :-)

Sharrock's comment, January 6, 2014 11:17 AM
At last, statistics that might interest teenagers!
Scooped by Sharrock
Scoop.it!

109 Common Core Resources For Teachers By Category

109 Common Core Resources For Teachers By Category | Teacher Tools and Tips | Scoop.it
109 Common Core Resources For Teachers By Category

 

The transition to the Common Core Standards is likely the single most significant change in the last 10 years in American public education.

While the English-Language Arts and Math haven’t changed, what the standards say about those content areas–and their relative complexity and rigor–are indeed different.

In a recent survey, you let us know you wanted more Common Core resources and support, so we’re going to ramp up our Common Core resources over the summer of 2013, including this list of various Common Core resources, separated by content area.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Sharrock
Scoop.it!

MALCOLM GLADWELL: If You Want A Science Or Math Degree, Do Not Go To Harvard

MALCOLM GLADWELL: If You Want A Science Or Math Degree, Do Not Go To Harvard | Teacher Tools and Tips | Scoop.it
You're just going to get frustrated, and not get your degree.
more...
No comment yet.