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S.A.S.S.Y. SAMR: Toolkit for Educators to Transform Instruction

S.A.S.S.Y. SAMR: Toolkit for Educators to Transform Instruction | Teacher Tools and Tips | Scoop.it
» S.A.S.S.Y. SAMR: Toolkit for Educators to Transform Instruction |

A New Way to look at SAMR (interactive infographic)


Via Lisa Johnson , John Evans, Lynnette Van Dyke
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ChristopherBell's curator insight, February 9, 4:43 PM

Very cool and full of resources if you are into SAMR!

jorganiser's curator insight, August 26, 9:37 PM

Not your same ol' SAMR!!

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Tools, tips and practices to share with teachers
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Teacher Reviewed Educational Apps for 2012 - We Are Teachers

Teacher Reviewed Educational Apps for 2012 - We Are Teachers | Teacher Tools and Tips | Scoop.it
Reviews and best practices from teachers who have used apps.

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Three Ways We Can All Become Better Teachers

Three Ways We Can All Become Better Teachers | Teacher Tools and Tips | Scoop.it

In Building a Better Teacher, Elizabeth Green draws upon years of interviews and research as an education writer and CEO of Chalkbeat to make the case for why teaching is a craft and that it can be taught to anyone.  Her excellent book should be read for a detailed account of the history of teacher education, an international context, and an entertaining narrative.  Here, I have distilled a few core insights from Elizabeth that each of us can use in learning to become a better teacher both inside and outside the classroom.

 
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Purdue OWL: Establishing Arguments

There are three types of rhetorical appeals, or persuasive strategies, used in arguments to support claims and respond to opposing arguments. A good argument will generally use a combination of all three appeals to make its case.

 

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Physical activity boosts boys' reading skills | Nursery World

Physical activity boosts boys' reading skills | Nursery World | Teacher Tools and Tips | Scoop.it
Read Physical activity boosts boys' reading skills childcare and the latest childcare & early years news & best practice on Nursery World (RT @EYCPDBarefoot: http://t.co/3E4PaHFrZo Physical activity...
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A Speech Is Not an Essay

A Speech Is Not an Essay | Teacher Tools and Tips | Scoop.it
Put the paper down.

 

"Speeches and essays are of the same genus, but not the same species. Each necessitates its own craft and structure. If you’re a great writer, don’t assume it will translate immediately to the spoken word. A speech is not an essay on its hind legs, and great speech writers and public speakers adapt accordingly."

Sharrock's insight:

These are some important points of distinctions of speeches and presentations from essays. This is something we educators might dismiss as obvious, until we assign a presentation as an alternative option to an essay in school whether the school is elementary, secondary, or post-secondary. A teacher could read this as a guide for discussion, but could also assign the reading to secondary school students (high school, college) as a prompt for producing a Venn Diagram or some other graphic organizer establishing comparisons of the two products. It might be helpful to also develop a rubric with the class for each product. You might complement this activity with one or two TEDx videos of presentations. Depending on the student Internet access profile of the school, students might watch these videos at home as homework and make some notes about technical aspects of the video (based on the points made in this article). These notes could be submitted online in Google Forms (teacher created) or some other application's forms. In this way, technology is involved in different ways while not becoming a distraction by being unwieldy. Otherwise, if students do not have broadband Internet access, video viewing might be completed in class, perhaps with guided viewing (similar to guided reading), and the assignment could be submitted with school-provided laptop carts, iPads, or via traditional  pen and paper response. The teacher might also consider the use of a "bad" or "less than great" example of a presentation which might be found on Youtube. 

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Start Living More As Your Future Self

Start Living More As Your Future Self | Teacher Tools and Tips | Scoop.it
How often do you think about your future self? It could make all the difference in how happy and successful you are later in life.
Sharrock's insight:

This kind of "orientation" towards preparing for you future self has an impact on decision making. It worked on some students in middle school. Many years ago, after reading "Flowers for Algernon", we did an activity that did something similar (since Charly realized his fate). It was a great opportunity to prompt thoughts on planning for a future. There is other literature that might work well as a springboard into college and career readying (not quite readiness), so that students are already impacted emotionally and intellectually, primed for the right mindset for planning. To clarify and raise the stakes, I suggested that Charly's loss was similar to dying. 

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How to improve students' writing

“There is a really big issue in the transition from school to university, and it’s getting bigger,” said Dr Adam Smith, UCL History. He is talking about first-year students and the difficulty they face in adapting to undergraduate essay-writing.

The problem, he says, stems from changes made to the A-Level curriculum over the past 10-15 years. As mark schemes for A-Level essays become more prescriptive, so students grow used to being spoon-fed essay plans. In some cases, that has left them unprepared to deal with the rigours of a university humanities programme.

His Provost’s Teaching Award-winning solution was to create Writing History – a first-year module unlike anything else on the programme.

In just its first year, it was better attended and more popular than any other compulsory course, with 100 percent of students agreeing the course was ‘good’ or ‘very good’. Every feedback respondent also said they’d benefitted from small group teaching – one of the hallmarks of the course – and Dr Smith’s colleagues agree student essays have improved as a result. 

Although he is quick to point out the style and structure of Writing History might not work for every discipline, there are a number of elements that others could find useful. Here are his key tips for improving essay-writing among undergraduates:

 

1 No-one likes generic skills courses, so don’t teach writing in isolation

I didn’t want to create a generic skills course. People find them boring. So we link Writing History to the topics that students are studying in their other modules.

The course kicks off with a few introductory lectures that introduce academic writing and research. After that, we match small student groups to tutors who have expertise in a subject the students are currently studying. As a result, the group can use examples and exercises that make sense to everyone and help them with those other courses.

You can’t artificially divorce content from form. That consideration was really key to the concept of the course and saved it from being a generic skills course that students would probably have hated.

2 Small group teaching offers major benefits

I’m really passionate about this. Across higher education there is still an obsession with contact hours. I think this is misplaced. Students don’t care about contact hours – they care about the quality of the contact.

One of the things that is completely new on this course is we break students into very small groups of three or four. That is what students really like and that’s what’s distinctive about it.

In these small groups, we then set practical writing exercises and discuss them with each other. It’s an opportunity to build confidence and ask questions in a situation that isn’t intimidating. It also gets them into the habit of peer assessment.

I don’t think you can’t replicate that in a standard seminar group or lecture.

3 When it comes to writing exercises, start small

All tutors have some leeway in designing their own tasks. What they have in common is the use of small writing assignments and group discussion.

In advance of my first tutorial session, I set a question relevant to my specialism. Students are asked to email their 150-word responses to me and the other students in the group. Then, in the tutorial, we pick them apart and discuss each other's. Why have they chosen those words? Have they communicated the idea they wanted to get across?

The discipline of writing 150 or 200 words is phenomenally helpful. It doesn’t sound like a lot of work, but is very difficult.

Other tasks include writing a synopsis of a book or condensing an argument in a short paragraph. I also present sentences taken from different parts of an essay and ask them to consider where they may have come from – the intro, the main body or conclusion. From here, we work up to planning and writing essays.

4 There is no formula for a perfect essay, but there are some key principles

A-Level students become used to receiving essay templates and detailed guidance. In Writing History, I present some key principles, but it is vastly less prescriptive than what they would be used to.

Really, the main thing I’m trying to do in laying out principles is explain the terminology tutors will be using in their feedback. I’ve noticed over the years I’ve been teaching that students can be confused by terms such as sources and structure, and I felt we weren’t spending enough time translating them. We are so ingrained in academic writing, we forget how difficult that initial introduction can be.

5 Feedback on the first attempt is crucial

Every History student writes their first essay in the context of this course. They each get to produce a first draft that they can discuss with their tutor. They then get feedback before producing a final draft.

Because students feel they are under a different assessment regime and aren’t sure what is expected of them, they are understandably anxious about writing, so the idea that the first time they give it a go they will get quality feedback on a draft is immensely reassuring.


Via Charles Tiayon
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Charles Tiayon's curator insight, September 2, 11:14 AM

“There is a really big issue in the transition from school to university, and it’s getting bigger,” said Dr Adam Smith, UCL History. He is talking about first-year students and the difficulty they face in adapting to undergraduate essay-writing.

The problem, he says, stems from changes made to the A-Level curriculum over the past 10-15 years. As mark schemes for A-Level essays become more prescriptive, so students grow used to being spoon-fed essay plans. In some cases, that has left them unprepared to deal with the rigours of a university humanities programme.

His Provost’s Teaching Award-winning solution was to create Writing History – a first-year module unlike anything else on the programme.

In just its first year, it was better attended and more popular than any other compulsory course, with 100 percent of students agreeing the course was ‘good’ or ‘very good’. Every feedback respondent also said they’d benefitted from small group teaching – one of the hallmarks of the course – and Dr Smith’s colleagues agree student essays have improved as a result. 

Although he is quick to point out the style and structure of Writing History might not work for every discipline, there are a number of elements that others could find useful. Here are his key tips for improving essay-writing among undergraduates:

1 No-one likes generic skills courses, so don’t teach writing in isolation

I didn’t want to create a generic skills course. People find them boring. So we link Writing History to the topics that students are studying in their other modules.

The course kicks off with a few introductory lectures that introduce academic writing and research. After that, we match small student groups to tutors who have expertise in a subject the students are currently studying. As a result, the group can use examples and exercises that make sense to everyone and help them with those other courses.

You can’t artificially divorce content from form. That consideration was really key to the concept of the course and saved it from being a generic skills course that students would probably have hated.

2 Small group teaching offers major benefits

I’m really passionate about this. Across higher education there is still an obsession with contact hours. I think this is misplaced. Students don’t care about contact hours – they care about the quality of the contact.

One of the things that is completely new on this course is we break students into very small groups of three or four. That is what students really like and that’s what’s distinctive about it.

In these small groups, we then set practical writing exercises and discuss them with each other. It’s an opportunity to build confidence and ask questions in a situation that isn’t intimidating. It also gets them into the habit of peer assessment.

I don’t think you can’t replicate that in a standard seminar group or lecture.

3 When it comes to writing exercises, start small

All tutors have some leeway in designing their own tasks. What they have in common is the use of small writing assignments and group discussion.

In advance of my first tutorial session, I set a question relevant to my specialism. Students are asked to email their 150-word responses to me and the other students in the group. Then, in the tutorial, we pick them apart and discuss each other's. Why have they chosen those words? Have they communicated the idea they wanted to get across?

The discipline of writing 150 or 200 words is phenomenally helpful. It doesn’t sound like a lot of work, but is very difficult.

Other tasks include writing a synopsis of a book or condensing an argument in a short paragraph. I also present sentences taken from different parts of an essay and ask them to consider where they may have come from – the intro, the main body or conclusion. From here, we work up to planning and writing essays.

4 There is no formula for a perfect essay, but there are some key principles

A-Level students become used to receiving essay templates and detailed guidance. In Writing History, I present some key principles, but it is vastly less prescriptive than what they would be used to.

Really, the main thing I’m trying to do in laying out principles is explain the terminology tutors will be using in their feedback. I’ve noticed over the years I’ve been teaching that students can be confused by terms such as sources and structure, and I felt we weren’t spending enough time translating them. We are so ingrained in academic writing, we forget how difficult that initial introduction can be.

5 Feedback on the first attempt is crucial

Every History student writes their first essay in the context of this course. They each get to produce a first draft that they can discuss with their tutor. They then get feedback before producing a final draft.

Because students feel they are under a different assessment regime and aren’t sure what is expected of them, they are understandably anxious about writing, so the idea that the first time they give it a go they will get quality feedback on a draft is immensely reassuring.

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How to Get Insecure Students to Work Harder

How to Get Insecure Students to Work Harder | Teacher Tools and Tips | Scoop.it
Over the past five years, more than $200 million has gone toward launching the new Common Core standards, with the goal of closing achievement gaps in public schools.
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7 Tech Upgrades to the Old-School Science Class

7 Tech Upgrades to the Old-School Science Class | Teacher Tools and Tips | Scoop.it
With tech breakthroughs and innovative ideas, science class isn't what it used to be.
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excerpt from webpage: 

Long gone are the days of science fair poster boards and paper quizzes, at least not exclusively.

Technological breakthroughs have flooded into classrooms, changing the face of K-12education. From smart boards to smartphones, these digital trends have become useful educational tools in the teaching process. While today's kids are learning the same lessons and concepts, they are absorbing in different ways.

SEE ALSO: 9 Incredible Science Projects by Brilliant Kids

With new apps and interactive sites, science class, in particular, has received a few upgrades. We took a look at how science technology has evolved over time, and what adjustments have been made.

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How Teachers Can Create Videos That Engage Students - Education Week

How Teachers Can Create Videos That Engage Students - Education Week | Teacher Tools and Tips | Scoop.it
As a teacher, you may think slick production is the way to go in building engaging learning videos, but new data shows that variables within your control (and budget!) have more of an impact.

Via John Evans
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Ness Crouch's curator insight, August 29, 4:39 PM

Videos are a great way to engage students. Yes it can be time consuming but can be used over and over again.

WEAC's curator insight, August 31, 7:28 AM

Here's a good back-to-school overview about creating classroom videos.

Reshelle Johnson's curator insight, September 1, 8:36 AM

I enjoyed making instructional videos for my students and letting them make them as well.  This article covers why we should not be hung up on having a polished video because shorter, less formal videos can be more effective.  I used the app Explain Everything on my iPad to record lessons, but there are some who say that having the teacher in the video is more effective.  I wasn't ready for that.

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Philosopher Martha Nussbaum on How to Live with Our Human Fragility

Philosopher Martha Nussbaum on How to Live with Our Human Fragility | Teacher Tools and Tips | Scoop.it
"To be a good human being is to have a kind of openness to the world, an ability to trust uncertain things beyond your own control."

In 1
Sharrock's insight:

This article and similar readings might help a teacher of social studies or English Language Arts develop some essential questions that the subject might explore. 

 

excerpt:

"Being a human means accepting promises from other people and trusting that other people will be good to you. When that is too much to bear, it is always possible to retreat into the thought, “I’ll live for my own comfort, for my own revenge, for my own anger, and I just won’t be a member of society anymore.” That really means, “I won’t be a human being anymore.”


"You see people doing that today where they feel that society has let them down, and they can’t ask anything of it, and they can’t put their hopes on anything outside themselves. You see them actually retreating to a life in which they think only of their own satisfaction, and maybe the satisfaction of their revenge against society. But the life that no longer trusts another human being and no longer forms ties to the political community is not a human life any longer."

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Suicide Prevention Information for Parents | Society for the Prevention of Teen Suicide

Suicide Prevention Information for Parents | Society for the Prevention of Teen Suicide | Teacher Tools and Tips | Scoop.it
The Society for the Prevention of Teen Suicide Parent information area provides information for parent about suicide prevention and where to get help.
Sharrock's insight:

these are resources and informative documents for parents. On the left of the page, links to webpages and documents include: 

FACTS – Warning Signs of Suicide (2.3MB PDF)

Not My Kid: What Every Parent Should Know Video

I am Worried About My Child (588k PDF)

Where Do We Go From Here? (599k PDF)

Talking to Your Kids About Suicide (638k PDF)

If My Child Needs Medication (470k PDF)

After an Attempt (431k PDF)

After an Attempt of a Friend (431k PDF)

When a Child's Friend Dies by Suicide (431k PDF)

Preparing Your Child to Attend the Funeral of a Friend (55k PDF)

A First-Person Message for Parents

Memorials After a Suicide (1.4MB PDF)

The Truth About Bullying (591k PDF)

Coping with Cyberbullying – The Use of Technology to Terrify By Suzanne Phillips, Psy.D., ABPP

College with Confidence

Mental Health Resources for College Students

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Student on Common Core: It's a "life changer"


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Don't Believe The Myth Of The Billionaire College Dropout

Don't Believe The Myth Of The Billionaire College Dropout | Teacher Tools and Tips | Scoop.it
Mark Zuckerberg really is the exception.

 

the major take home message is this: Nearly all American billionaires attended at least some college with the vast majority of them graduating from college. So if you want to be a billionaire, this analysis would suggest that to maximize your chances you should not drop out of college.

Unless, of course, 1. you have a Thiel Fellowship, or 2. you are the next Gates, Zuckerberg, or Jobs and the opportunities presented to you are simply too good to resist.

Sharrock's insight:

Something to share with kids who think college is useless...

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Common Core State Standards: A Good Fit for Gifted Education

Common Core State Standards: A Good Fit for Gifted Education | Teacher Tools and Tips | Scoop.it

Jennifer G. Beasley, Ed.D. is an assistant professor at the University of Arkansas. 


The short answer is yes. The Common Core State Standards are not arbitrary but draw on a firm foundation of the National Assessment of Educational Progress (NAEP) frameworks in reading and writing as well as conclusions from the Trends in International Mathematics and Science Study (TIMSS) report.


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The Guardians style guide editor on putting the fears around texting into historical context

The Guardians style guide editor on putting the fears around texting into historical context | Teacher Tools and Tips | Scoop.it
Every minute, the worlds mobile phone users send more than 15 million text messages. There is no evidence that any of them have forgotten how to write
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26 Glorious Things America Gave the World - Science Infographic - e-Learning Infographics

26 Glorious Things America Gave the World - Science Infographic - e-Learning Infographics | Teacher Tools and Tips | Scoop.it

SomethingThe 26 Glorious Things America Gave the World - Science Infographic Infographic demonstrates one of America’s most important strengths.

Sharrock's insight:

Something to share from middles school and high shcool social studies and the science classes. Some of the "things" given might not be conventionally used though. You might want to prepare a brief inquiry-based activity attached to exploring the relevance of these "things" in the real world.

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Sports Coach :: What Every Coach Should Know About Energy Systems

Sports Coach :: What Every Coach Should Know About Energy Systems | Teacher Tools and Tips | Scoop.it

Author:  Catherine Sellers, United States Olympic Committee 
Issue: Volume 29 Number 3

When we talk about training it can be simplified to stress, recovery and adaptation.  As a coach, your job is to stress the physiology of the athlete through training, the athlete has a period of recovery (rest) and the athlete’s physiology adapts. Through adaptation the athlete can gradually develop the capability to handle more training or training with more intensity.  As the coach, you manipulate combinations of training frequency (how often you train) training intensity (how hard you train) and training duration (how long you train) and the type or mode of training.

 

Another key factor is how the training you do relate to your sport or specificity.  If I run long distance, I have improved my endurance adaptation, but it does not transfer the adaptation to developing strength and power.  Physiologists call this SAID – Specific Adaptations to Imposed Demands. The athlete by following your training plan will adapt to the type of load that you place upon them.

 

We have all heard of Non-oxidative (Anaerobic) and Oxidative (Aerobic), but what do these terms really mean.  Non-oxidative (without oxygen) supplies rely on using stored resources (ATP, CP and production of lactic acid) and do not go into using oxygen to produce more energy.   Oxidative (with oxygen) the body uses oxygen to aid in energy production through what is called the Krebs cycle. This whole process is called oxidation phosphorylation.


The standard energy of all human motion is the release of energy from ATP (Adenosine Triphosphate).  Therefore, all of the components are related to the resynthesis or replenishment of ATP or the removal and/or dissipation of the waste products associated with maintaining our ATP supplies.

 

The trained athlete has the ability to utilise the system or systems necessary to replenish the ATP that is being utilised.  The three major components: ATP/CP, LA and oxidative have the ability to support activities of varying intensities and durations.  All athletes have the ability to produce power and work intensities that exceed their ability to resynthesize ATP.  For example, even in a 100m sprint on the track the athlete slows down due to fatigue.  Similarly, in a series of five jumps or explosive lifts, power output drops.

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A simpler way to teach writing: the one trait rubric -

A simpler way to teach writing: the one trait rubric - | Teacher Tools and Tips | Scoop.it
I used to spend hours grading students essays and felt extremely frustrated by the subjectiveness of my system. It was very difficult to think about all six traits of effective writing–ideas/content, organization, voice, word choice, sentence fluency, and conventions–at one time while grading. I’d often get sidetracked by mistakes in one area, such as spelling or …

Via Charles Tiayon
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Charles Tiayon's curator insight, September 1, 4:17 PM

Using a straightforward rubric with only 3 or 4 criteria makes it clear to students and parents why an assignment earned the grade it did. It also prevents the teacher from downgrading a paper by weighting one aspect of good writing too heavily. Concentrating on only one trait makes it easier for the teacher to fairly assess a student’s skills in a particular trait.

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Following My Heart to First Grade: A Borrowed

Following My Heart to First Grade: A Borrowed | Teacher Tools and Tips | Scoop.it
an entertaining and highly engaging lesson to teach inference.
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Rude vs. Mean vs. Bullying: Defining the Differences - HUFF POST PARENTS

Rude vs. Mean vs. Bullying: Defining the Differences - HUFF POST PARENTS | Teacher Tools and Tips | Scoop.it
It is important to distinguish between rude, mean and bullying so that teachers, school administrators, police, youth workers, parents and kids all know what to pay attention to and when to intervene....

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What Are The Habits Of Mind? - Te@chThought

What Are The Habits Of Mind? - Te@chThought | Teacher Tools and Tips | Scoop.it

Habits of Mind are dispositions that are skillfully and mindfully employed by characteristically intelligent, successful people when they are confronted with problems, the solutions to which are not immediately apparent.  When we draw upon these mental resources, the results are more powerful, of higher quality, and of greater significance than if we fail to employ those habits."

 


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LUZ DEL MAR's curator insight, August 29, 9:56 PM

posibles causas del desinteres el no manejo de habilidades cognitivas

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Lawyers Won’t Lose Clients to DIY Legal Services

Lawyers Won’t Lose Clients to DIY Legal Services | Teacher Tools and Tips | Scoop.it
People who want to do their own legal work are, naturally, not likely to hire a lawyer in the first place. And people who hire lawyers do not want to do their own legal work.
Sharrock's insight:

Every few weeks, I find an article promising that some kind of technology will replace the human employee--teacher, accountant, etc. This article explains why lawyers will not probably be replaced. For some of the same reasons, teachers will also never be replaced...at least, not for a very long time.

 

excerpt: "Currently, consumers can pick from a range of options for do-it-yourself legal services. You can get a divorce at OfficeMax, a will from Amazon, and dissolve a partnership with LegalZoom. Those are just a few examples, of course. There are hundreds of DIY legal documents available online and offline."

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Sharrock's curator insight, August 29, 8:39 AM

Every few weeks, I find an article promising that some kind of technology will replace the human employee--teacher, accountant, etc. This article explains why lawyers will not probably be replaced. For some of the same reasons, teachers will also never be replaced...at least, not for a very long time.

 

excerpt: "Currently, consumers can pick from a range of options for do-it-yourself legal services. You can get a divorce at OfficeMax, a will from Amazon, and dissolve a partnership with LegalZoom. Those are just a few examples, of course. There are hundreds of DIY legal documents available online and offline."

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Play Cool Math Games with your iPad and Smart device - StreetWise Tech

Play Cool Math Games with your iPad and Smart device - StreetWise Tech | Teacher Tools and Tips | Scoop.it
StreetWise Tech
Play Cool Math Games with your iPad and Smart device
StreetWise Tech
Squeebles Maths Bingo – the opponent in this game is the math monster, which has stolen all the ingredients.
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Parenting teens is easy once you embrace being an embarrassment

Parenting teens is easy once you embrace being an embarrassment | Teacher Tools and Tips | Scoop.it
Everyone with teenagers please raise your free hand. And by "free" hand, I mean whichever hand isn't either guarding your wallet or refrigerator door. For parents without a free hand because you ar...
Sharrock's insight:

I liked it so much, I reblogged it.

 

This is something that teachers and school guidance counselors might find useful. Kids are conflicted with the impulse to separate as individuals and clinging to their parents like the children they used to be. They also want to seem serious and knowledgeable, so being cool is a top priority.

 

As a teacher and administrator, I've been very embarrassing (often intentionally and for my own amusement) and have found that when I stopped doing some of my antics, the kids are disappointed. They love it (secretly). They like to complain about it to each other and they laugh but something about it is valued. I suspect it's because it tells them that I love my job and love playing with them (even when I'm telling them something they don't want to hear), but it's also genuine. They know the laugh is real. 

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Getting into the PBL Groove

Getting into the PBL Groove | Teacher Tools and Tips | Scoop.it
Let your students know from day one that they're in a PBL classroom by defining PBL and setting the tone for collaboration, critique, and questioning.
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