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Rescooped by Sharrock from School Leadership, Leadership, in General, Tools and Resources, Advice and humor
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▶ Is Punishment or Reward More Effective? - YouTube

 

 

The psychologist Daniel Kahneman, winner of the 2002 Nobel prize in economics, pointed out that regression to the mean might explain why rebukes can seem to improve performance, while praise seems to backfire.[8] http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Regression_toward_the_mean

 

 

I had the most satisfying Eureka experience of my career while attempting to teach flight instructors that praise is more effective than punishment for promoting skill-learning. When I had finished my enthusiastic speech, one of the most seasoned instructors in the audience raised his hand and made his own short speech, which began by conceding that positive reinforcement might be good for the birds, but went on to deny that it was optimal for flight cadets. He said, “On many occasions I have praised flight cadets for clean execution of some aerobatic maneuver, and in general when they try it again, they do worse. On the other hand, I have often screamed at cadets for bad execution, and in general they do better the next time. So please don’t tell us that reinforcement works and punishment does not, because the opposite is the case.” This was a joyous moment, in which I understood an important truth about the world: because we tend to reward others when they do well and punish them when they do badly, and because there is regression to the mean, it is part of the human condition that we are statistically punished for rewarding others and rewarded for punishing them. I immediately arranged a demonstration in which each participant tossed two coins at a target behind his back, without any feedback. We measured the distances from the target and could see that those who had done best the first time had mostly deteriorated on their second try, and vice versa. But I knew that this demonstration would not undo the effects of lifelong exposure to a perverse contingency.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Regression_toward_the_mean

Sharrock's insight:

Why do people resist research findings from areas like leadership, education, parenting, and other areas related to psychology and sociology? One reason may result from the confusion between the use and value of controlled experiments and the value of anecdotal evidence. 

 
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Sharrock's curator insight, January 11, 2014 4:49 PM

Why do people resist research findings from areas like leadership, education, parenting, and other areas related to psychology and sociology? One reason may result from the confusion between the use and value of controlled experiments and the value of anecdotal evidence. 

 

Sharrock's curator insight, January 11, 2014 4:50 PM

Why do people resist research findings from areas like leadership, education, parenting, and other areas related to psychology and sociology? One reason may result from the confusion between the use and value of controlled experiments and the value of anecdotal evidence. 

 
Sharrock's curator insight, January 11, 2014 4:51 PM

Why do people resist research findings from areas like leadership, education, parenting, and other areas related to psychology and sociology? One reason may result from the confusion between the use and value of controlled experiments and the value of anecdotal evidence. 

 
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Teacher Reviewed Educational Apps for 2012 - We Are Teachers

Teacher Reviewed Educational Apps for 2012 - We Are Teachers | Teacher Tools and Tips | Scoop.it
Reviews and best practices from teachers who have used apps.

Via Dr. Susan Bainbridge
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9 Cool Facts About Magnets

9 Cool Facts About Magnets | Teacher Tools and Tips | Scoop.it
Magnetism is light: Why do magnets stick? Magnets attract each other because they exchange photons, or the particles that make up light. But unlike the photons streaming out of a desk lamp or reflecting off of everything you see around you, these photons are virtual, and your eyes (or any particle detector) can't "see" them. They can, however, exchange momentum, and this is why they stick to things or repel them. When a kid throws a dodge ball, they're exchanging momentum with the ball, and the thrower feels a slight push back. Meanwhile the target person feels the force of the ball, and (maybe) gets knocked over — they are "repelled" from the thrower. With photons, the process can also happen in reverse, as though one kid reached out and grabbed the ball while the other was still hanging on to it, which would look like an attractive force.

Photons are the force carriers not only for magnets but also for electrostatic phenomena like static electricity, and it's why electromagnetism is the term we use for effects produced by these phenomena – including light, which is an electromagnetic wave.
Sharrock's insight:

If I had ever been told that magnetism results from an exchange of photons, I think I would have become a physicist just to better understand this statement:

 

"Magnetism is light: Why do magnets stick? Magnets attract each other because they exchange photons, or the particles that make up light. But unlike the photons streaming out of a desk lamp or reflecting off of everything you see around you, these photons are virtual, and your eyes (or any particle detector) can't "see" them. They can, however, exchange momentum, and this is why they stick to things or repel them. When a kid throws a dodge ball, they're exchanging momentum with the ball, and the thrower feels a slight push back. Meanwhile the target person feels the force of the ball, and (maybe) gets knocked over — they are "repelled" from the thrower. With photons, the process can also happen in reverse, as though one kid reached out and grabbed the ball while the other was still hanging on to it, which would look like an attractive force.

Photons are the force carriers not only for magnets but also for electrostatic phenomena like static electricity, and it's why electromagnetism is the term we use for effects produced by these phenomena – including light, which is an electromagnetic wave."

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5 Essential Types of Social Proof (and the Psychology Behind Them)

5 Essential Types of Social Proof (and the Psychology Behind Them) | Teacher Tools and Tips | Scoop.it

You’re walking along a busy sidewalk, dodging passersby, when a small group of people catches your eye. They’re standing in the middle of the path, heads tilted back in unison, staring at the sky.

 

You look, but you can’t see anything. Still, the crowd stares. You stand with them, searching for the source of their fixation. The crowd grows around you, and soon dozens of people are staring wordlessly into the sky.

 

Believe it or not, this is a real-life study conducted in 1969 by psychologist Stanley Milgram. A small group of people staring silently into an empty sky was influential enough to cause 80% of passersby to copy their actions, without any reason for doing so.

 

The Power of Social Proof

 

This is the power of social proof: our innate psychological tendency to use the wisdom of the crowd to influence our own decisions....


Via Jeff Domansky
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Jeff Domansky's curator insight, March 3, 2:26 AM

Exploring the social media possibilities of social proof.

Marco Favero's curator insight, March 3, 3:44 AM

aggiungi la tua intuizione ...

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Compfight / A Flickr Search Tool

Compfight / A Flickr Search Tool | Teacher Tools and Tips | Scoop.it
Search engine for visual inspiration and free stock photos for the advertising community including images of creative commons and public domain.

Via Kathleen Cercone
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StockSnap.io - Beautiful Free Stock Photos

StockSnap.io - Beautiful Free Stock Photos | Teacher Tools and Tips | Scoop.it
The #1 source for beautiful free stock photos. High quality and high resolution images free from all copyright restrictions - no attribution required.

Via Nik Peachey
Sharrock's insight:

Nik Peachey's insight:

Great collection of images for materials or students' projects. All CC and free even for commercial use.

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Nik Peachey's curator insight, March 3, 8:39 AM

Great collection of images for materials or students' projects. All CC and free even for commercial use.

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The threshold concept and the design of learning experiences

The threshold concept and the design of learning experiences | Teacher Tools and Tips | Scoop.it
The threshold concept is an important one in the development of curriculum and learning experiences in general. I came across this excellent resource provided by UCL Department of Electronic and El...
Sharrock's insight:

(excerpt) "In the Four E’s Model” for engaging teams in change efforts, education is  identified as technical work. It is not. It is both technical and adaptive and the development of any training program or informal learning experience, whether face-to-face, online, or a blended version of the two, must consider the adaptive change required to integrate learning, not just into the day-to-day of performing technical work, but into the development of new mindsets required to make this technical work successful. "

 
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There's Such a Thing as a Flavorist, and 9 Other Awesome Food Jobs

There's Such a Thing as a Flavorist, and 9 Other Awesome Food Jobs | Teacher Tools and Tips | Scoop.it
Try to name 10 food industry jobs, and the majority of them will probably involve either writing or working in a restaurant. But, in reality, the playing field is incredibly vast. Every single food item that you’ll find in a supermarket needs to be invented, developed, and tested; every element of a restaurant needs to be expertly planned; and every food product needs to look great when it’s on television or in an advertisement. And that’s just the tip of the iceberg.
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50 Free Animation Tools And Resources For Digital Learners

50 Free Animation Tools And Resources For Digital Learners | Teacher Tools and Tips | Scoop.it
50 Free Animation Tools And Resources For Digital Learners
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38 maps that explain Europe

38 maps that explain Europe | Teacher Tools and Tips | Scoop.it
Europe, as both a place and a concept, has changed dramatically in its centuries of history.

 

Tags: Europe, map.


Via Seth Dixon
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Bob Beaven's curator insight, February 19, 2:24 PM

These 38 different maps show how Europe, and the understanding of the continent (and what is East and West) changes overtime.  Today, the Greeks are closely aligned with Western Europe (they are after all considered the birthplace of the Western World), however this was not always the case as shown in Map 6.  In the days of the Byzantine Empire, the Greeks were competing with their Western European counterparts, and the Eastern Roman Empire long out survived its Western Counterpart.  Another interesting map to understanding why Europe is comprised of such small countries is all the different peoples that live in the region.  In the British Isles for example, there are Scots, English, Welsh and Irish (not to mention Cornish which map 13 excludes).  The Iberian Peninsula is no more united than the British Isles, Portuguese, Gallacians, Spanish, and Catalans all live in the region.  The modern country of Spain, in fact, comprises a union of Spanish, Gallacians and Catalans, with the Portuguese inhabiting a country of their own.  Europe is so difficult to understand as many diverse people have inhabited the area for so long, each leaving their mark on the individual  countries.  Europe is puzzling, and rightly so, for American observers.    

Padriag John-David Mahoney's curator insight, February 19, 3:17 PM

Despite the number of maps and figures, this is a really nice, condensed  broad stroke  of European history and politics, geography, and some economies. It's  also, for me, very entertaining.

Louis Mazza's curator insight, February 26, 7:49 PM

Europe was once the most war torn nation, but is now known for its peace. This article’s introduction says that Europe has relative great prosperity but at the same time deep economic turmoil. I guess like everywhere else. This is a collection of 38 maps that show Europe in different stages of development to give the reader a better understanding. The first maps shows the countries that make up the EU. NATO’s growth is show in the second map from 1949 to 2009. Some maps show the unemployment rates, while others show who in Europe uses the Euro. Mine home country of Italy is shown in the lowest category of unemployment in the southern region. Other maps illustrate the histories of Europe starting in 117. AD. I think that this collection of maps is awesome for gathering knowledge on Europe. It sure is teaching me a lot.

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Why Is The Dollar Sign A Letter S?

Why Is The Dollar Sign A Letter S? | Teacher Tools and Tips | Scoop.it
The letter S appears nowhere in the word "dollar", yet an S with a line through it ($) is unmistakably the dollar sign. But why an S?
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The Common Core Has Not Killed Literature

The Common Core Has Not Killed Literature | Teacher Tools and Tips | Scoop.it
Jaume Escofet/Flickr By now almost every teacher in the country has experienced the Common Core State Standards. We’re teaching and assessing them; we’re advocating for them or pushing against them.
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DC middle schoolers protest instructors fired for allegedly teaching too much ... - Raw Story

DC middle schoolers protest instructors fired for allegedly teaching too much ... - Raw Story | Teacher Tools and Tips | Scoop.it
Raw Story
DC middle schoolers protest instructors fired for allegedly teaching too much ...
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Gifted children get ignored in school despite huge future contribution ...

Gifted children get ignored in school despite huge future contribution ... | Teacher Tools and Tips | Scoop.it
The authors of the largest ever study of the profoundly gifted question whether the education system is providing enough support for highly talented young people. The US study, published in the journal Psychological Science, ...

Via Douglas Eby
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iPamba's curator insight, January 12, 2014 9:51 AM

Do children with learning difficulties automatically receive extra help? Experiences often suggest otherwise. And we should be careful to resist any tendency to simplify complex realities into either/or polarities. Learning difficulties may co-exist with giftedness, and giftedness may be concealed behind poverty and other social and emotional roadblocks. Education systems and measures are not neutral. Were we to invest resources into enabling each child to blossom and grow, our future would be less dependent on nurturing the full potential of the relative few who meet the standard criteria and measures for giftedness. 

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Field Cameras Catch Deer Eating Birds—Wait, Why Do Deer Eat Birds?

Field Cameras Catch Deer Eating Birds—Wait, Why Do Deer Eat Birds? | Teacher Tools and Tips | Scoop.it
Deer aren't the slim, graceful vegans we thought they were. Scientists using field cameras have caught deer preying on nestling song birds. And it's not just deer. Herbivores the world over may be supplementing their diets.
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Pastoral Romance

Pastoral Romance | Teacher Tools and Tips | Scoop.it

Betty Jo Patton spent her childhood on a 240-acre farm in Mason County, West Virginia, in the 1930s. Her family raised what it ate, from tomatoes to turkeys, pears to pigs. They picked, plucked, slaughtered, butchered, cured, canned, preserved, and rendered. They drew water from a well, cooked on a wood stove, and the bathroom was an outhouse. 

 

Sharrock's insight:

excerpt: "I eventually asked Betty Jo what she thought of her granddaughter’s notion of returning to the land. Betty Jo smiled, but was blunt: “Leave it. There’s nothing romantic about it.”

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Gerrymandering Visualized

Gerrymandering Visualized | Teacher Tools and Tips | Scoop.it
By simplifying gerrymandering we see how problematic it really is.

Via Seth Dixon
Sharrock's insight:
Seth Dixon's insight:

The redistricting process is far from neutral; to be fair we should remember that gerrymandering is has happened on all ends of the political spectrum.  Which map do you think is the best way to divide these districts?  What is the fairest way to divide them?

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Seth Dixon's curator insight, March 1, 11:09 PM

The redistricting process is far from neutral; to be fair we should remember that gerrymandering is has happened on all ends of the political spectrum.  Which map do you think is the best way to divide these districts?  What is the fairest way to divide them?


Tags: gerrymandering, political, mapping, census, unit 4 political.

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Common Core testing trouble: Computer problems, student protests and more

Common Core testing trouble: Computer problems, student protests and more | Teacher Tools and Tips | Scoop.it

Disruptions Mar Rollout Of Common Core Testing.

Valerie Strauss writes at the Washington Post (3/2) “Answer Sheet” blog that there were a number of protests and other disruptions have marred the rollout of Common Core testing in states and districts across the country, citing student protests in New Mexico, computer problems in Florida, and the controversy over Chicago’s now-rescinded refusal to administer the tests.

 


Via Mel Riddile
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Penrith Farms's curator insight, March 4, 6:24 PM

Absolutely inspiring.  Students opting out in the thousands and student protests against standardized tests.  Not an accurate measurement of education.

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45 Free Stock Images for E-learning

45 Free Stock Images for E-learning | Teacher Tools and Tips | Scoop.it
Here are 45 free stock images for you to use in your e-learning courses. They are curated from the free stock images available via Unsplash.com.

Via callooh
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callooh's curator insight, February 25, 5:41 PM

Among the great tips in this article, a curated collection of desk/office images

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The Inhumanity of the Death Penalty

The Inhumanity of the Death Penalty | Teacher Tools and Tips | Scoop.it
In America, the history of the criminal justice—and of executions—is inseparable from white supremacy.
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Using Film to Teach Analysis Skills

Using Film to Teach Analysis Skills | Teacher Tools and Tips | Scoop.it
Bring real-world authenticity to literacy analysis by including movie criticism in your lessons.
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Earth's surprise inside: The inner core seems to have its own inner core

Earth's surprise inside: The inner core seems to have its own inner core | Teacher Tools and Tips | Scoop.it

Thanks to a novel application of earthquake-reading technology, a research team at the University of Illinois and colleagues at Nanjing University in China have found that the Earth’s inner core has an inner core of its own, which has surprising properties that could reveal information about our planet. 

Led by Xiaodong Song, a professor of geology at the U. of I., and visiting postdoctoral researcher Tao Wang, the team published its work in the journal Nature Geoscience on Feb. 9. 

“Even though the inner core is small – smaller than the moon – it has some really interesting features,” said Song. “It may tell us about how our planet formed, its history, and other dynamic processes of the Earth. It shapes our understanding of what’s going on deep inside the Earth.”

Researchers use seismic waves from earthquakes to scan below the planet’s surface, much like doctors use ultrasound to see inside patients. The team used a technology that gathers data not from the initial shock of an earthquake, but from the waves that resonate in the earthquake’s aftermath. The earthquake is like a hammer striking a bell; much like a listener hears the clear tone that resonates after the bell strike, seismic sensors collect a coherent signal in the earthquake’s coda. 


Via Dr. Stefan Gruenwald
Sharrock's insight:

Does this mean Earth Science and geology books might need a small revision?

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Sensorimotor Recalibration Depends on Attribution of Sensory Prediction Errors to Internal Causes

Sensorimotor Recalibration Depends on Attribution of Sensory Prediction Errors to Internal Causes | Teacher Tools and Tips | Scoop.it

Sensorimotor learning critically depends on error signals. Learning usually tries to minimise these error signals to guarantee optimal performance. Errors can, however, have both internal causes, resulting from one’s sensorimotor system, and external causes, resulting from external disturbances. Does learning take into account the perceived cause of error information? Here, we investigated the recalibration of internal predictions about the sensory consequences of one’s actions. Since these predictions underlie the distinction of self- and externally produced sensory events, we assumed them to be recalibrated only by prediction errors attributed to internal causes. When subjects were confronted with experimentally induced visual prediction errors about their pointing movements in virtual reality, they recalibrated the predicted visual consequences of their movements. Recalibration was not proportional to the externally generated prediction error, but correlated with the error component which subjects attributed to internal causes. We also revealed adaptation in subjects’ motor performance which reflected their recalibrated sensory predictions. Thus, causal attribution of error information is essential for sensorimotor learning.


Via Ashish Umre
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Statistics is the fastest-growing undergraduate STEM degree

Statistics is the fastest-growing undergraduate STEM degree | Teacher Tools and Tips | Scoop.it
Statistics—the science of learning from data—is the fastest-growing science, technology, engineering and math (STEM) undergraduate degree in the United States over the last four years, an analysis of federal government education data conducted by...
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Google Earth Pro now available free for all users

Google Earth Pro now available free for all users | Teacher Tools and Tips | Scoop.it
Google Earth Pro is free now, there are no such barriers to using the software.
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Intensity and Being Creative | Developing Multiple Talents

Intensity and Being Creative | Developing Multiple Talents | Teacher Tools and Tips | Scoop.it

A personality trait that may often accompany high sensitivity (experienced by many, or most, creative people) is high intensity.

 

Nicole Kidman gave a nice description of what many other actors and other artists experience: “You live with a lot of complicated emotions as an actor, and they whirl around you and create havoc at times. And yet...you’re consciously and unconsciously allowing that to happen."

 

Psychologist Eric Maisel says that ‘smart’ people often experience challenges with personality and a racing brain that "may be flowing directly from your natural endowment.”


Via Douglas Eby
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10 Thinking Errors That Will Crush Your Mental Strength

10 Thinking Errors That Will Crush Your Mental Strength | Teacher Tools and Tips | Scoop.it
... and how to overcome them.

 

Mental strength requires a three-pronged approach—managing our thoughts,regulating our emotions, and behaving productively despite our circumstances.


While all three areas can be a struggle, it's often our thoughts that make it most difficult to be mentally strong. 

 

As we go about our daily routines, our internal monologue narrates our experience. Our self-talk guides our behavior and influences the way we interact with others. It also plays a major role in how you feel about yourself, other people, and the world in general.

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