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Google hosts ‘code-in’ to get teens contributing to open-source projects

Google hosts ‘code-in’ to get teens contributing to open-source projects | Teacher Tools and Tips | Scoop.it
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Dec. 4 - 5, 2013
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Contributing to free/open-source software is one of the best ways to learn how to be a better hacker, both technically and ethically.
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Teacher Tools and Tips
Tools, tips and practices to share with teachers
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Teacher Reviewed Educational Apps for 2012 - We Are Teachers

Teacher Reviewed Educational Apps for 2012 - We Are Teachers | Teacher Tools and Tips | Scoop.it
Reviews and best practices from teachers who have used apps.

Via Dr. Susan Bainbridge
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Alan Alda Names ​Flame Challenge Champs ​Who Best Explain "What is Energy?" to 11-Year Olds

An international contest now in its sixth year, The Flame Challenge is judged by 11-year-olds around the world, challenging scientists at every level – from graduate students to senior researchers – to answer and communicate familiar yet complex concepts in a way that is understandable to an 11-year-old. Entries can be submitted in written or visual format.

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“Why is your research important?” – Society

“Why is your research important?” – Society | Teacher Tools and Tips | Scoop.it

One of the strongest arguments for the importance of basic research is that without it, the scientific discoveries and technological innovations of the last century with the greatest societal impact would have been impossible. Without basic research, it is unlikely that we would have cell phones, computers, or the internet. We wouldn’t have advances in green energy, or even an understanding of why developing green energy sources might be important for our future. And we wouldn’t have new cancer treatments, HIV drug development, or the emerging promise of personalized medicine and genome editing. For all of these incredible advances, tracing back to the scientific discoveries making them possible inevitably reveals important but obscure research done by scientists not interested in creating the next Earth-shattering technological innovation, but instead just trying to use science to understand why and how things work the way they do.

Sharrock's insight:
Science teachers and social studies teachers alike need to be able to answer questions similar to this question. By using history to support scientific discoveries as accidents is not enough to drive home the idea that exploring to understand how and why things work out of curiosity can lead to future benefits that may save mankind. This is a powerful statement: "Basic research is generally done to further scientific knowledge without obvious or immediate societal benefits. If, like me, you do basic research, the question about why your research is important for society is difficult to answer." It can begin with this article.

The mindset against basic science is similar to the argument for turning education into a commodity, something to make a profit or to "get rich" with. Learning more about something serves humanity regardless of whether the understanding leads to immediate profit, immediate benefits, or leads to the solution to some future, unexpected problem. 
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Ivon Prefontaine, PhD's curator insight, June 15, 12:38 PM
Good research is essential to improve teaching and learning. The key here is we stand on the shoulders of those who come before. We question what is taken-for-granted. It is not just quantitative research, but mixed methods and qualitative that add to the science. John Dewey used the etymology of empiricism, which means "a rule fo thumb." That is where we begin. Classroom teachers can add to the research if given opportunities and time.
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Why we spend billions to keep half a million unconvicted people behind bars

Why we spend billions to keep half a million unconvicted people behind bars | Teacher Tools and Tips | Scoop.it
Imagine staying behind bars for months or years -- without ever facing trial
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20 Classic Poems Every Man Should Read | The Art of Manliness

20 Classic Poems Every Man Should Read | The Art of Manliness | Teacher Tools and Tips | Scoop.it
Matthew Arnold, a Victorian poet, once claimed, “The crown of literature is poetry,” and if our neglect of poetry is any indication, the crown is rusting. While books sales fluctuate from year to year, fewer and fewer publishing houses are printing volumes of poetry. The demand for poets and their poems has ebbed.

However, we do ourselves a great disservice when we neglect the reading of poetry. John Adams, one of the founding fathers of the United States, commended poetry to his son John Quincy. Both Abraham Lincoln and Theodore Roosevelt committed their favorite poems to memory. Ancient kings were expected to produce poetry while also being versed in warfare and statecraft. That poetry has fallen out of favor among men in the 21st century is a recent trend rather than the norm.

To help remedy this, we have compiled a list of 20 classic poems that every man should read. Spanning the past two thousand years, the poems on this list represent some of the best works of poetry ever composed. But don’t worry—they were selected for both their brevity and ease of application. Some are about striving to overcome, others about romantic love, and still others about patriotism. Whether you’ve been reading poetry for years or haven’t read a single line since high school, these poems are sure to inspire and delight you.
Sharrock's insight:
I first read Kipling's "If..." in a Flash comic book. Wally West took over the mantle of the Flash when Barry Allen died in the Crisis of Infinite Earths. Wally, a young adult, no longer a sidekick, is experiencing performance issues where he can't run as fast as he used to run, so he sees a psychiatrist. The psychiatrist diagnoses Wally with "Impostor's Syndrome." He tells Wally about the poem. 
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How Putin keeps the internet under state control

How Putin keeps the internet under state control | Teacher Tools and Tips | Scoop.it
Today, the Kremlin has solidified its grip on online outlets. It employs a full-scale censorship agency, Roskomnadzor, which threatens to block news websites that don't comply with its ever-tightening, labyrinthine regulation. Russia's defence minister Sergei Shoigu recently announced the creation of "propaganda troops" in the Russian army. According to the human-rights group Sova, the number of prosecutions for sharing what's described as "extremist" content has risen from ten in 2007 to 216 in 2015, resulting in fines and prison terms. A recent report from Agora, a human-rights group, lists 97 laws and regulations passed in 2016 that directly affect the ability of news organisations to operate online - compared with just five in 2011. New websites are blocked every day and there is talk of a blanket ban on services that allow users to circumvent these blocks. In five years, the Kremlin - spooked by the 2011-2012 protests against election fraud in Moscow - has brought the internet in Russia under almost complete control. The very people who, 20 years earlier, helped build the foundations of the Russian internet - such as Putin's adviser, German Klimenko, and the prominent web entrepreneur Igor Ashmanov - are now vocal proponents of ideas like banning foreign social networks that are positioned as endangering Russian national security.
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I no longer understand my PhD dissertation (and what this means for Mathematics Education)

I no longer understand my PhD dissertation (and what this means for Mathematics Education) | Teacher Tools and Tips | Scoop.it
A thesis represents the very small subset of ideas that came good. It does not include failed efforts, yet they are the ones that define much of the research experience. Those failed efforts often contain the key insights that inspired the final breakthroughs. They condition the mathematician with a mental toughness. My own results only materialised after three years of failure and frustration (which included several renewed commitments to quit the damn thing altogether).
Sharrock's insight:
What started out as an article inviting the reader to question the value of a doctorate in math, ends with the suggestion that "it's the journey; not the destination." 
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9 Questions to Improve Metacognition

9 Questions to Improve Metacognition | Teacher Tools and Tips | Scoop.it
What is metacognition? This blog looks at how to improve metacognition. Based on our growth mindset and metacognition workshop, this blog gives 9 simple tips
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Europe's Top Court Is Debating the 'Right to Be Forgotten' After Google Refused Requests

Europe's Top Court Is Debating the 'Right to Be Forgotten' After Google Refused Requests | Teacher Tools and Tips | Scoop.it
The "right to be forgotten"—or stopping certain web search results from appearing under searches for people's names—will be debated at the European Union's top court after Alphabet's Google refused requests from four individuals.
In May 2014, the Court of Justice of the European Union (ECJ) ruled that people could ask search engines, such as Google and Microsoft's Bing (MSFT, +0.47%), to remove inadequate or irrelevant information from web results appearing under searches for people's names—dubbed the "right to be forgotten".
Sharrock's insight:
Although this article is about court debates in Europe, these and similar questions are asked in the United States. 
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Why Does My Child Still Have Temper Tantrums?

Why Does My Child Still Have Temper Tantrums? | Teacher Tools and Tips | Scoop.it
One thing you don’t want to do is try to reason with your child when he’s upset. As Dr. Dickstein puts it, “Don’t talk to the kid when he’s not available.” You want to encourage a child to practice at negotiation when he’s not blowing up, and you’re not either.

You may need to teach techniques for working through problems, breaking them down step by step, if your son is immature or has deficits in this kind of thinking and communication. These are important skills for him to learn in order to do well in school and with friends, as well as to make family life more positive.
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What’s the Difference Between Executive Functioning Issues and ADHD?

What’s the Difference Between Executive Functioning Issues and ADHD? | Teacher Tools and Tips | Scoop.it
Simply put, executive functions are self-regulating skills. We all use them every day to do things like plan ahead, stay organized, solve problems and focus on what’s important. These are some of the same things kids with ADHD have trouble doing. So is there a difference between executive functioning issues and ADHD? And if so, what is it?

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Reaching Students With Emotional Disturbances

Reaching Students With Emotional Disturbances | Teacher Tools and Tips | Scoop.it
A seasoned educator shares four ideas for supporting students who have suffered emotional trauma.
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Survivor of ‘74 Tochni massacre: Eoka B fired for 10 minutes - Cyprus Mail

Survivor of ‘74 Tochni massacre: Eoka B fired for 10 minutes - Cyprus Mail | Teacher Tools and Tips | Scoop.it
By Rally Papageorgiou Every August 14, for the past 43 years, Suat Kafadar wakes up with an itch at the back of his head, where a bullet grazed him in 1974 when Greek Cypriot paramilitaries executed 84 Turkish Cypriot men and boys from the village of Tochni. Kafadar, 62, was the sole survivor of the …
Sharrock's insight:
For Global History teachers. 
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No Jargon Spoken Here: Communicating About Science « - Smith College Grécourt Gate Smith College Grécourt Gate

No Jargon Spoken Here: Communicating About Science « - Smith College Grécourt Gate Smith College Grécourt Gate | Teacher Tools and Tips | Scoop.it
“You can’t pick up a newspaper these days without seeing articles about policies informed by scientific research,” Lowenthal says. “But as scientists, we are trained to speak in jargon and not to think about our audience. Bottom line: we need to become better communicators.”
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Why we spend billions to keep half a million unconvicted people behind bars

Why we spend billions to keep half a million unconvicted people behind bars | Teacher Tools and Tips | Scoop.it

Imagine staying behind bars for months or years -- without ever facing trial. 


 "New analysis shows using money to decide release while awaiting trial unfairly impacts low-income communities, should be replaced with practices that better protect public safety and reduce social and taxpayer costs."

Sharrock's insight:
For social studies teachers of secondary school (high school), when exploring the judicial system, you might assign a research project around disparities of justice for people belonging to various races and social class. Some students can explore the policy and the reality of "guilty until proven innocent" and "innocent until proven guilty". It can still include topics like "racial profiling" but should include the price of justice, the unintentional consequences of public defenders getting assigned when you can't afford a private attorney, the bail bonds, civil rights, human rights violations, to name a few. Students can learn to use data to support their claims. 
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What Employees Want to See Most in Their Bosses Comes Down to a Single Word, Says Research

In a recent study published in the Harvard Business Review, close to 20,000 employees around the world say there's one thing that leaders need to demonstrate. Hint: Aretha Franklin sang about it 50 years ago.
Sharrock's insight:
First, recognize that in a classroom, the students are akin to employees in a knowledge work environment. Next, explore how respect can be used interchangeably with appreciation, recognition, and dignity. When that is recognized, you may get insights into why PBIS is important. PBIS, after all, does not depend on tokens; it depends on recognition.
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That time when “the Hollywood elite” took on Washington, 70 years ago

That time when “the Hollywood elite” took on Washington, 70 years ago | Teacher Tools and Tips | Scoop.it
In 1947, Hollywood became a target for the House Un-American Activities Committee (HUAC), which was established in 1938 to investigate the influence of citizens suspected of Communist ties, launching what the journalist and author Edward Jay Epstein called a “full-scale cultural inquisition.”
These alleged subversives—writers, actors, studio executives, and directors among them—were subpoenaed and asked to identify Communists in the industry. “Friendly witnesses,” including Walt Disney and then-Screen Actors Guild president Ronald Reagan, named names. Others who refused to testify, including “the Hollywood Ten,” were forced to choose between imprisonment and exile, and were blacklisted in Hollywood.
Sharrock's insight:
Ties to blacklists and the Cold War. Few topics stir up teenagers more than Freedom of Speech topics.
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Do Mom and Dad know what’s good for their children online? - The Hechinger Report

Do Mom and Dad know what’s good for their children online? - The Hechinger Report | Teacher Tools and Tips | Scoop.it
Experts have been changing their opinion about screens, even for the littlest learners, who were once encouraged not to watch any screens whatsoever. In October, the American Academy of Pediatrics updated its rules for how much time young children may safely spend with screens, such as TV and digital devices. They also stressed that the quality of the media is very important – an hour with a mindless game is not the same as an hour spent in a high-quality educational game.
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Ivon Prefontaine, PhD's curator insight, June 12, 1:18 PM
There is "evidence that the so-called digital natives might prefer blended learning methods, which mix technology and in-person interaction."
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How my supervisor saved my PhD — the Goldilocks principle for mathematics

How my supervisor saved my PhD — the Goldilocks principle for mathematics | Teacher Tools and Tips | Scoop.it
when the problem is pitched at just the right level — where it stretches the child’s knowledge, as well as their imagination — they will soar. It is the Goldilocks principle for maths educators.
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How army rations helped change food

How army rations helped change food | Teacher Tools and Tips | Scoop.it
Walking down the aisles of the grocery store, you will see many packaged goods with roots in science developed for a different purpose – and not just from the modern era. Even the humble can has military origins: during the Napoleonic Wars, the French government called for a way to preserve food for soldiers over the long term, and canning, albeit in sealed glass jars, was born. It's an odd state of affairs, to be sure, this creep from the battlefield to the supermarket, but its effects have been substantial.
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5 Commencement Speeches That'll Inspire You (Even if You Graduated Forever Ago)

5 Commencement Speeches That'll Inspire You (Even if You Graduated Forever Ago) | Teacher Tools and Tips | Scoop.it
Need a bit of inspiration today? We've compiled our favorite commencement speeches of all time on doubt, fear, hardship, and tackling the working world.
Sharrock's insight:
Might be useful for teachers and students at this time of the year. 
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Where Anti-Tax Fervor Means ‘All Services Will Cease’

Where Anti-Tax Fervor Means ‘All Services Will Cease’ | Teacher Tools and Tips | Scoop.it
https://mobile.nytimes.com/2017/05/13/us/anti-tax-fervor-roseburg-oregon-.html?#_=_ " what does life in government retreat look like? "It looks like the house on Hubbard Creek Road in Curry County, where owners went for more than 10 years without paying any property taxes at all because the county assessor’s office couldn’t field enough workers to go out and inspect. The house, nestled in the woods with a tidy blue roof and skylights, dodged more than $8,500 in property taxes that would have gone to support the schools, fire district and sheriff, because government had gotten too small to even ask. So things fall even further, with cuts to agencies that actually bring in revenue prompting further cuts down the line." (From the article)
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At a Glance: 8 Key Executive Functions

At a Glance: 8 Key Executive Functions | Teacher Tools and Tips | Scoop.it
If your child has executive functioning issues, you may hear about mental processes and skills. Learn the details of executive skills, like working memory.
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6 Ways Kids Use Flexible Thinking to Learn

6 Ways Kids Use Flexible Thinking to Learn | Teacher Tools and Tips | Scoop.it
Flexible thinking is used in reading, writing, math and learning life skills. Find out how flexible thinking and executive functioning skills helps learning.
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A Yale history professor’s powerful, 20-point guide to defending democracy under a Trump presidency

A Yale history professor’s powerful, 20-point guide to defending democracy under a Trump presidency | Teacher Tools and Tips | Scoop.it
Americans are no wiser than the Europeans who saw democracy yield to fascism, Nazism, or communism. Our one advantage is that we might learn from their experience. Now is a good time to do so. Here are twenty lessons from the twentieth century, adapted to the circumstances of today: 1. Do not obey i
Sharrock's insight:
The title could have left out "Trump" to make it a more timeless article, but the suggestions have many implications for citizen behavior in a democracy. This includes many challenges to how students and teachers should behave towards leadership and towards the possibility of authoritarian behaviors in general. Subversive. 
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