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33rd Square: Attack of the Self-Driving Cars Infographic

33rd Square: Attack of the Self-Driving Cars Infographic | Teacher Tools and Tips | Scoop.it
Intrigued with the concept of the driverless car, Autoinsurance.us wanted to find out how the public felt on that exact topic, so they released several Google Consumer Survey to find out the answers to various questions concerning the self-driving...
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Tools, tips and practices to share with teachers
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Teacher Reviewed Educational Apps for 2012 - We Are Teachers

Teacher Reviewed Educational Apps for 2012 - We Are Teachers | Teacher Tools and Tips | Scoop.it
Reviews and best practices from teachers who have used apps.

Via Dr. Susan Bainbridge
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The year abroad 2.0: how technology is changing foreign study

The year abroad 2.0: how technology is changing foreign study | Teacher Tools and Tips | Scoop.it
Technology can help combat loneliness – but won’t solve all the problems you encounter
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The Definition of Insanity is...

The Definition of Insanity is... | Teacher Tools and Tips | Scoop.it
Where did this saying come from? It's attributed to Albert Einstein (probably not (link is external)), Benjamin Franklin (probably not (link is external)), Mark Twain (probably not (link is external)) and mystery writer Rita Mae Brown (probably so (link is external)) who used it in her novel Sudden Death (link is external). It's not clear who said it first, but according to at least one blogger (link is external) it's "the dumbest thing a smart person ever said." The catchy saying has gathered steam in the past few years (example I (link is external), II (link is external), III (link is external)), and regardless of the source, it's gotten a lot of mileage.
Sharrock's insight:

I totally agree with the statement above.I found this article while researching my own response to this ridiculous statement. 

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5 Things I Learned Working in a Restaurant Kitchen

5 Things I Learned Working in a Restaurant Kitchen | Teacher Tools and Tips | Scoop.it
nobody becomes a chef for the money, they do it for the thrill, the creativity, and the energy.
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How to fix a broken system

How to fix a broken system | Teacher Tools and Tips | Scoop.it

re: The financial crisis

 

"The origins of the crisis lie in the revolutionary changes in the structure of the global economy and finance in the 1990s and early 2000s (these are the “shifts” of the book’s title). The macroeconomic shift was the emergence of a “savings glut” as countries from China to Germany saved more than they invested, pushing down real interest rates. Both at a global level and within the euro area financial innovation and freer capital mobility transformed these excess savings into huge cross-border capital flows, sending asset prices and credit soaring and, in the process, creating an inherently fragile financial system. Unfettered finance transformed the savings glut into a credit bubble. And in both cases the bursting of that bubble worsened the savings glut, as households, companies and governments in Europe slashed their spending.

"Mr Wolf argues that the post-crisis recovery has been feeble because too many policymakers failed to understand this dynamic. Rather than accepting that bigger fiscal deficits would be the natural counterweight to private thrift, politicians pushed for austerity. Far too little emphasis was put on restructuring unpayable debts. At the same time, the underlying causes of the savings glut have, if anything, become stronger as deeper factors such as rising inequality have kept overall spending weak. Larry Summers, a Harvard economist, has argued that the rich world faces “secular stagnation”. Mr Wolf also believes that weak demand is here to stay. So, too, is the fragility of finance. Despite “manic rule making” he argues that banks are still a powder keg, with insufficient capital, and are liable to wreak havoc when they blow up.

Sharrock's insight:

excerpt: "[Mr. Wolf's] more moderate suggestions include requiring banks to hold vastly more capital and the creation of insurance schemes that allow emerging economies, the most plausible engines of demand, to import capital safely and sustainably. But moderate change may not be enough. Pushing his analysis to its logical conclusion, he argues that the only way to deal with today’s underlying problems—a fragile financial system and a secular weakness in demand—may be to move away from bank-based credit altogether and rely on permanent budget deficits financed by central banks. Forcing banks to match their deposits with safe government bonds would reduce the risks of bank crashes and encourage a healthier reliance on equity finance. Permanent money-financed deficits would, in turn, provide a safer way to sustain spending than private-asset booms and busts. If done responsibly, they need not cause inflation."

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A broken system

A broken system | Teacher Tools and Tips | Scoop.it
Nicaragua’s police force is in danger of giving socialism a good name. The country is one of the poorest in the hemisphere. Yet its annual murder rate, 11 per 100,000 people, is among the lowest in Latin America and eight times lower than in neighbouring Honduras (see map).
Sharrock's insight:

This article should be explored as a contribution to the debate on Justice systems--criminal justice and the penal system. It might be seen as an argument against the politically conservative attitudes toward criminals. To develop a more sophisticated argument, narratives and case studies should be found and used. 

 

On the other hand, the same article presents cases that support aggressive approaches against crime, like Rio de Janeiro's "pacification policy", in addition to progressive approaches that include education and social programs.

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The history of British slave ownership has been buried: now its scale can be revealed

The history of British slave ownership has been buried: now its scale can be revealed | Teacher Tools and Tips | Scoop.it
A new BBC documentary tells how a trove of documents lays bare the names of Britain’s 46,000 slave owners, including relatives of Gladstone and Orwell
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The International Resilience Project: Findings from the Research and the Effectiveness of Interventions

The coalescing views entailed recognizing some traits and characteristics these resilient children had that were different from or not as frequently found in children who were not resilient. The traits were identified by different researchers and practitioners, but there was growing consensus on their identification. The International Resilience Project organized those traits into the following categories: External supports and resources, including trusting relationships; access to health, education, welfare and security services; emotional support outside the family; structure and rules at home; parental encouragement of autonomy; stable school environment; stable home environment; role models; and religious organizations (morality); Internal, personal strengths, including a sense of being lovable; autonomy; appealing temperament; achievement oriented; self-esteem; hope, faith, belief in God, morality, trust; empathy and altruism; and locus of control; Social, interpersonal skills, including creativity; persistence; humor; communication; problem solving; impulse control; seeking trusting relationships; social skills; and intellectual skills.
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The Color of Money

The Color of Money | Teacher Tools and Tips | Scoop.it
Bill Dedman received the Pulitzer Prize in investigative reporting in 1989 for researching and writing these articles.

The first series, published May 1-4, 1988, disclosed that Atlanta's banks and savings and loan institutions, although they had made loans for years in even the poorest white neighborhoods of Atlanta, did not lend in middle-class or more affluent black neighborhoods. The focus moved to lenders across the nation with the January 1989 article, "Blacks turned down for home loans from S&Ls twice as often as whites."

As a result of the stories, the federal Home Mortgage Disclosure Act was expanded to provide more information to the public on the pattern of activity by all mortgage lenders.
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Reading dystopias ‹ Reader — WordPress.com

Reading dystopias ‹ Reader — WordPress.com | Teacher Tools and Tips | Scoop.it

Utopia: an imagined society or state of things in which everything is perfect or close to perfect.

Dystopia: an imagined society or state of things in which things are very far from perfect to a frightening extent.

An introduction to the genre of dystopian fiction through reading a classic dystopian novel.

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The Best Damn Guide to Men’s T-Shirts on the Internet

The Best Damn Guide to Men’s T-Shirts on the Internet | Teacher Tools and Tips | Scoop.it

T-shirts get their name from the T-shape formed by their boxy body and attached sleeves. And such T-shaped garments go back centuries; originally made from wool or silk, these sets of underwear often covered the whole body, were designed to absorb perspiration, and served as a barrier between a man’s skin and the more expensive garments he wanted to protect from bodily grime.

Sharrock's insight:

Some articles can surprise you with their information and history research. The t-shirt (aka undershirt) has some interesting connections based on how they were used and worn. 

 

Technology teachers, as well as secondary school teachers of history, can develop an interesting discussion about technology around its intended uses and actual/practical uses. Discussions can plunge deeper by exploring historical context, for example, social customs and practices as they are influenced by GIs returning from the war fronts to live as civilians. Words, attitudes, social interactions, gender politics, and more are influenced by the returnees. 

 

 

 

 

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The world eats cheap bacon at the expense of North Carolina’s rural poor

Pork has always been important to North Carolina’s economy. It was among 16 commodities used as legal tender by colonists in the early 1700s, and for almost as long, farmers and their neighbors have been fighting over how the animals should be managed. Today, the industry accounts for close to $8 billion a year in revenue and 46,000 full-time jobs in production and processing, according to the North Carolina Pork Council, making the state the second largest pork producer in the US.


Accompanying all those swine is a lot of waste—hogs produce two-to-five times as much waste as humans. North Carolina does not release exactly how much manure is produced a year, and Smithfield declined to disclose how much its pigs produce, but estimates range between 15.5 million tons (pdf, p. 5) for the state’s top five pork producing counties to 2.53 billion gallons for the whole state. The nearly 2.3 million hogs raised in Duplin County generated twice as much waste as the entire city of New York (p.11) in 2007, the nonprofit Food and Water Watch estimates.

Sharrock's insight:

This article could lead to deeper understanding of systems and the idea that there is no such thing as a free (or cheap) lunch. There are almost always victims in our economy. Food production is no exception.

 

What does this say about the relationship between democracy and capitalism? What are some easy solutions to the problems in this article? What are some predictions of unintended consequences? 

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WATCH: The Science of Beer

WATCH: The Science of Beer | Teacher Tools and Tips | Scoop.it
The world's first beer brewers came from ancient Egypt and the southern Mesopotamian civilisation of Sumer in modern-day Iraq some 8,000 years ago. They invented the crisp, amber drink by mixing bread, germinated grain and water in ceramic jars,...
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Do We Really Have High Expectations for All?

Do We Really Have High Expectations for All? | Teacher Tools and Tips | Scoop.it
When it comes to high expectations, learning consultant Barbara Blackburn says actions speak louder than beliefs. Using her own classroom mistakes as a backdrop, she points out the teacher behavior...
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11 Reasons Why It’s So Hard Being A Lawyer (Part I)

11 Reasons Why It’s So Hard Being A Lawyer (Part I) | Teacher Tools and Tips | Scoop.it
What do lawyers wish non-lawyers understood about them, and why is it so hard to be a lawyer in the first place?
Sharrock's insight:

Knowledge workers have so many similar gripes with us educators. Lawyers have even more than expected.

I hope to blog about these similarities or to produce a similar list along the same lines, line by line, except there are some statements that don't apply to educators at all.

 

This statement remains true only for lawyers: “Lawyers are the one profession in which pessimists outperform optimists.” ~Ross Guberman

 

 

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The Essential Tools for Fixing Kitchen Mistakes

The Essential Tools for Fixing Kitchen Mistakes | Teacher Tools and Tips | Scoop.it
When all else fails, I like to turn to the food and philosophy of Mr. Shopsin, who taught me (and I quote!) “that not being so terrific -- that’s OK. Because most people who say they are terrific: Bill Clinton, Cardinal Egan. Anybody you want to talk about -- they’re not so terrific. Martha Stewart? Not so terrific either. There is nothing wrong with not being so terrific. It’s what the whole ball game is about, not being so terrific and accepting it.”  
Sharrock's insight:

This kind of advice can be stretched--extremely stretched, but stretched--for us in other professions. 

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The unhealthy modern Indian

The unhealthy modern Indian | Teacher Tools and Tips | Scoop.it
Sodas and snacks are taking Indians down a deadly road.
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Who Rules America: The Class-Domination Theory of Power

Who has predominant power in the United States? The short answer, from 1776 to the present, is: Those who have the money -- or more specifically, who own income-producing land and businesses -- have the power. George Washington was one of the biggest landowners of his day; presidents in the late 19th century were close to the railroad interests; for the Bush family, it was oil and other natural resources, agribusiness, and finance. In this day and age, this means that banks, corporations, agribusinesses, and big real estate developers, working separately on most policy issues, but in combination on important general issues -- such as taxes, opposition to labor unions, and trade agreements with other countries -- set the rules within which policy battles are waged.

While this conclusion may at first seem too simple or direct, leaving little room for elected officials or voters, the reasons behind it are complex. They involve an understanding of social classes, the role of experts, the two-party system, and the history of the country, especially Southern slavery. In terms of the big world-historical picture, and the Four Networks theory of power advocated on this site, large economic interests rule in America because there are no rival networks that grew up over a long and complex history:

There is no one big church, as in many countries in Europe
No big government, as it took to survive as a nation-state in Europe
No big military until after 1940 (which is not very long ago) to threaten to take over the government
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10 Things You Don't Know About Formative Assessment - Brilliant or Insane

10 Things You Don't Know About Formative Assessment - Brilliant or Insane | Teacher Tools and Tips | Scoop.it
Formative assessment is a verb, not a noun: ten things you don't know about formative assessment.
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The Road To Resilience

The Road To Resilience | Teacher Tools and Tips | Scoop.it
Make connections. Good relationships with close family members, friends or others are important. Accepting help and support from those who care about you and will listen to you strengthens resilience. Some people find that being active in civic groups, faith-based organizations, or other local groups provides social support and can help with reclaiming hope. Assisting others in their time of need also can benefit the helper.


Avoid seeing crises as insurmountable problems. You can't change the fact that highly stressful events happen, but you can change how you interpret and respond to these events. Try looking beyond the present to how future circumstances may be a little better. Note any subtle ways in which you might already feel somewhat better as you deal with difficult situations.


Accept that change is a part of living. Certain goals may no longer be attainable as a result of adverse situations. Accepting circumstances that cannot be changed can help you focus on circumstances that you can alter.


Move toward your goals. Develop some realistic goals. Do something regularly — even if it seems like a small accomplishment — that enables you to move toward your goals. Instead of focusing on tasks that seem unachievable, ask yourself, "What's one thing I know I can accomplish today that helps me move in the direction I want to go?"


Take decisive actions. Act on adverse situations as much as you can. Take decisive actions, rather than detaching completely from problems and stresses and wishing they would just go away.


Look for opportunities for self-discovery. People often learn something about themselves and may find that they have grown in some respect as a result of their struggle with loss. Many people who have experienced tragedies and hardship have reported better relationships, greater sense of strength even while feeling vulnerable, increased sense of self-worth, a more developed spirituality and heightened appreciation for life.


Nurture a positive view of yourself. Developing confidence in your ability to solve problems and trusting your instincts helps build resilience.


Keep things in perspective. Even when facing very painful events, try to consider the stressful situation in a broader context and keep a long-term perspective. Avoid blowing the event out of proportion.
Maintain a hopeful outlook. An optimistic outlook enables you to expect that good things will happen in your life. Try visualizing what you want, rather than worrying about what you fear.


Take care of yourself. Pay attention to your own needs and feelings. Engage in activities that you enjoy and find relaxing. Exercise regularly. Taking care of yourself helps to keep your mind and body primed to deal with situations that require resilience.


Additional ways of strengthening resilience may be helpful. For example, some people write about their deepest thoughts and feelings related to trauma or other stressful events in their life. Meditation and spiritual practices help some people build connections and restore hope.

 

The key is to identify ways that are likely to work well for you as part of your own personal strategy for fostering resilience.

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Blind Spots to Developing a School Culture of Leadership | The Leader In Me

Blind Spots to Developing a School Culture of Leadership | The Leader In Me | Teacher Tools and Tips | Scoop.it
RT @TheLeaderinMe: Do you check your blind spots when driving? What about as a school leader? http://t.co/MtgpkuEqHC #TLIM #edchat
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September 27, 2012: Roundtable on Redlining

September 27, 2012: Roundtable on Redlining | Teacher Tools and Tips | Scoop.it
Financial institutions such as banks and insurance agencies continued to use redlining to discriminate against potential homeowners and to penalize those seeking insurance well into the 1970s and 80s. Even after a number of prominent lawsuits in the 1990s, small business in black and minority neighborhoods continue to receive fewer loans than comparable white areas.  At the same time, predatory home lending policies have increasingly targeted black and other minority consumers for subprime mortgages, pushing more expensive products on them even if they could qualify for less onerous payment plans.
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Reforming the Teaching History Then and Now (Part 1)

Reforming the Teaching History Then and Now (Part 1) | Teacher Tools and Tips | Scoop.it
What Gorton and Limbaugh wanted students to learn was a commemorative version of the past—the familiar “heritage” view–rather than one where students apply historical thinking. Historian Gary Nash and colleagues stated the issue this way:

Should classrooms emphasize the continuing story of America’s struggle to form a ‘more perfect union,’ a narrative that involved a good deal of jostling, elbowing, and bargaining among contending groups? A story that included political tumult, labor strife, racial conflict, and civil war? Or should the curriculum focus on successes, achievements, and ideals, on stories designed to infuse young Americans with patriotism and sentiments of loyalty toward prevailing institutions, traditions, and values?
Sharrock's insight:

This is a powerful blog find after I read about the School As Factory Metaphor article by Larry Cuban that was shared by David Franklin, Ed.D. https://www.linkedin.com/in/davidfranklin. It's part of a series of observations that Larry Cuban is using for a forthcoming book. 


The article itself explores the different philosophies behind the teaching of history. One powerful point was the distinction: "commemorative version of the past—the familiar “heritage” view–rather than one where students apply historical thinking." 


This is something that indicates that there are powerful narratives driving Conservative Thought that is different from the Academic/Progressive Thought that drives some of the subversive Education Reform Thought. 


Those thinkers who are familiar with Duckworth/Bandura's grit and perseverance studies and Carol Dweck's Mindset studies and the promotion of the "open mindset" will take issue with a "curriculum focus on successes, achievements, and ideals, on stories designed to infuse young Americans with patriotism and sentiments of loyalty toward prevailing institutions, traditions, and values". 

 

This kind of curriculum would deny and reject failure and hard work as a factor in success. It also undermines the historical importance of collaboration, communication, problem solving processes, and political processes driving American history and accomplishment. This is a promotion of learning facts rather than encouraging individual thought and inquiry. This "heritage view" of history promotes dogma and the memorizing of dogma. Not to mention, the curriculum promotes a lie.


Secondary School history teachers should offer this article and others from this series to promote discussions in the classroom about the politics of education and learning. It can also explore the meaning of dogma and can explore the importance of "multiple perspectives" to approach truth. 


This article can also help with faculty in schools pursuing reform. Some of the educators may believe in the "heritage view" of history education but may not have understood how destructive it can be for lifelong learning goals. Education impacts attitudes and mindsets of students as well as educators. 

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The “rage to master”: What it takes for those scary-smart kids to succeed

The “rage to master”: What it takes for those scary-smart kids to succeed | Teacher Tools and Tips | Scoop.it
Gladwell's practice theory is only partly right. A host of things must line up for the would-be prodigy to thrive

 

“Unfortunately, many people have an overly simplistic understanding of talent,” says University of Pennsylvania psychologist Kaufman, who writes about intelligence and creativity in his Beautiful Minds blog for Scientific American. “In fact, there is no such thing as innate talent,” Kaufman contends. “Gareth Bale wasn’t born with the ability to score memorable goals. There are certainly genetic influences, but talents aren’t prepackaged at birth; they take time to develop.” In other words, high achievers are born, then made.

 
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Rita's Ice Drops Custard From Menu Because of Egg Crisis

Rita's Ice Drops Custard From Menu Because of Egg Crisis | Teacher Tools and Tips | Scoop.it
The avian flu pandemic, the worst in American history, has killed more than 47 million hens
Sharrock's insight:
"As of June, the avian flu had killed up to 47 million egg-laying hens, making it the worst avian flu pandemic in American history. The crisis has sent egg prices skyrocketing; American consumers will spend roughly $8 billion more on eggs this year, a 75% increase from last year’s spending." (Excerpt )
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Before Misty Copeland, There Was Lauren Anderson

Broadway Black takes a look at Lauren Anderson, the first African American to be promoted to principal dancer at Houston Ballet – and one of the few African American ballerinas at the head of a major ballet company anywhere in the world.
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