Teacher Tools and...
Follow
Find
2.6K views | +1 today
 
Scooped by Sharrock
onto Teacher Tools and Tips
Scoop.it!

7 Tricks Used by Servers to Increase the Bill (and their Tips) |

7 Tricks Used by Servers to Increase the Bill (and their Tips) | | Teacher Tools and Tips | Scoop.it
Writing from Paris, the Telegraph's Henry Samuel claims French journalists have disclosed an impressive array of techniques used by Gallic waiters to boost their tips.
more...
No comment yet.
Teacher Tools and Tips
Tools, tips and practices to share with teachers
Curated by Sharrock
Your new post is loading...
Your new post is loading...
Rescooped by Sharrock from The 21st Century
Scoop.it!

Teacher Reviewed Educational Apps for 2012 - We Are Teachers

Teacher Reviewed Educational Apps for 2012 - We Are Teachers | Teacher Tools and Tips | Scoop.it
Reviews and best practices from teachers who have used apps.

Via Dr. Susan Bainbridge
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Sharrock
Scoop.it!

A five-step guide to not being stupid

A five-step guide to not being stupid | Teacher Tools and Tips | Scoop.it
The problem, says Robert Sternberg at Cornell University, is that our education system is not designed to teach us to think in a way that is useful for the rest of life. “The tests we use – the SATs or A-levels in England – are very modest predictors of anything besides school grades,” he says. “You see people who get very good grades, and then they suck at leadership. They are good technicians with no common sense, and no ethics. They get to be the president or vice-president of corporations and societies and they are massively incompetent.”
What can be done? Sternberg and others are now campaigning for a new kind of education that teaches people how to think more effectively, alongside more traditional academic tasks. Their insights could help all of us – whatever our intelligence – to be a little less stupid:
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Sharrock
Scoop.it!

A Beginner’s Guide to Education Conferences

A Beginner’s Guide to Education Conferences | Teacher Tools and Tips | Scoop.it
Conferences are valuable ways to grow professionaly. Consultant Anne Anderson, who attended many such events as a teacher, offers a complete beginner's guide.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Sharrock
Scoop.it!

The formula that's supposed to 'prove beauty' is fundamentally wrong

The formula that's supposed to 'prove beauty' is fundamentally wrong | Teacher Tools and Tips | Scoop.it
"It's not that we haven't disproved that the golden ratio explains the human body, it's that we haven't proved it," Devlin says. "I'm not saying any of these things are false, I'm saying that as a scientist, the way they argue it is bullshit. There's just no substantiation for it."
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Sharrock
Scoop.it!

DNews: How Did They Build the Pyramids? With Water! : DNews

DNews: How Did They Build the Pyramids? With Water! : DNews | Teacher Tools and Tips | Scoop.it
Kasey-Dee Gardner sat down with Kara Cooney to learn what it's like to be an Egyptologist.
Sharrock's insight:

career info--pursuing an academic career in cultural egyptology

more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Sharrock from iPads in Education
Scoop.it!

Some Very Good iPad Apps to Help Students Create Educational Animations ~ EdTech and MLearning

Some Very Good iPad Apps to Help Students Create Educational Animations ~ EdTech and MLearning | Teacher Tools and Tips | Scoop.it
In yesterday’s post we talked about three main ways students can demonstrate their learning that is through the creation of educational posters, videos and/or digital portfolios. There is also the possibility of creating creative animations as a way to communicate their thinking. To this end, we are sharing with you some of our favourite apps that student can use in class or at home to design beautiful animations.

Via John Evans
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Sharrock from Effective Technology Integration into Education
Scoop.it!

Online vs. Classroom Learning: The Ultimate Showdown

Online vs. Classroom Learning: The Ultimate Showdown | Teacher Tools and Tips | Scoop.it
This article describes the pros and cons of learning in the classroom versus online. Choose the best way depending on the type of material and situation.

Via Eve Lackman, Mark E. Deschaine, PhD
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Sharrock from Internet Tools for Language Learning
Scoop.it!

Educational Technology and Mobile Learning: 7 Wonderful YouTube Channels for Motivational Videos to Use in Class

Educational Technology and Mobile Learning: 7 Wonderful YouTube Channels for Motivational Videos to Use in Class | Teacher Tools and Tips | Scoop.it

Via RitaZ
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Sharrock
Scoop.it!

How to Run a Meeting of People from Different Cultures

How to Run a Meeting of People from Different Cultures | Teacher Tools and Tips | Scoop.it

Multicultural meetings can be tricky to lead. “People bring their cultural baggage with them wherever they go—and that includes the workplace,” says Jeanne M. Brett, professor of dispute resolution and negotiations at Kellogg School of Management. Communication styles vary from culture to culture as do notions of authority and hierarchy, which only heightens the potential for misunderstanding and hard feelings. “If you don’t prepare for cultural differences and anticipate them at the front end, they’re a lot harder to deal with after the fact,” she says. It’s daunting but you needn’t feel overwhelmed, says Erin Meyer, a professor at INSEAD and the author of The Culture Maps. Approach your cross-cultural meeting with an open mind. And, have faith in your abilities because “you likely have more experience than you know,” adds Andy Molinsky, professor of organizational behavior at Brandeis University International Business School and the author of the book Global Dexterity. “You’ve probably run meetings where there was quite a lot of diversity, be it gender diversity, functional diversity, seniority diversity, or just different personalities—culture is one more element,” he says. Here are some ideas to help ensure that your multicultural meetings go smoothly.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Sharrock
Scoop.it!

Reframing Your Dark Side: Embracing Your Shadow Is Key to Genuine Mental Health

Reframing Your Dark Side: Embracing Your Shadow Is Key to Genuine Mental Health | Teacher Tools and Tips | Scoop.it
it’s often counterproductive to think of emotions as solely “positive” or “negative,” but instead to ask yourself, “Am I responding to this emotion in a constructive or destructive way?”
Sharrock's insight:

author's insight: "The mind is a very complex and interesting thing. While many of the things discussed in this article can be dangerous and destructive in high doses, they can also be healthy and constructive to embrace every now and then. I highly recommend checking out the book The Upside of Your Dark Side if you’d like to learn more."

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Sharrock
Scoop.it!

How Do I Make Friends At Work?

How Do I Make Friends At Work? | Teacher Tools and Tips | Scoop.it
The best way to start might be to chat with some of the people you are closest to. It's okay to confide in them that you feel disconnected to everyone at work because so much of your work is done alone. Invite them to have lunch with you. Along the way, you can also ask them to bring along a few other people you might benefit from meeting.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Sharrock
Scoop.it!

Martin Niemöller - Wikiquote

Martin Niemöller - Wikiquote | Teacher Tools and Tips | Scoop.it
When the Nazis came for the communists,
I remained silent;
I was not a communist.

When they locked up the social democrats,
I remained silent;
I was not a social democrat.

When they came for the trade unionists,
I did not speak out;
I was not a trade unionist.

When they came for the Jews,
I remained silent;
I wasn't a Jew.

When they came for me,
there was no one left to speak out.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Sharrock
Scoop.it!

Fallacies

Fallacies | Teacher Tools and Tips | Scoop.it

Most academic writing tasks require you to make an argument—that is, to present reasons for a particular claim or interpretation you are putting forward. You may have been told that you need to make your arguments more logical or stronger. And you may have worried that you simply aren’t a logical person or wondered what it means for an argument to be strong. Learning to make the best arguments you can is an ongoing process, but it isn’t impossible: “Being logical” is something anyone can do, with practice.

Each argument you make is composed of premises (this is a term for statements that express your reasons or evidence) that are arranged in the right way to support your conclusion (the main claim or interpretation you are offering).

Sharrock's insight:

Which of the following best describe how you would want your friend to respond to you after you tell them about this frustrating situation?

Emphathize - show they understand and feel your feelings as if they were their own

Trade Stories - tell you about a similarly {emotion} experience that they've had

Advice - offer you advice as to how you can work through or improve your situation

Sympathize - show they are sorry and feel bad for you that you went through a {emotion} experience

Validate - show that they think it's very reasonable and understandable to feel how you felt in this situation

Brainstorm - offer to work together with you to come up with ideas for how you can feel better and reduce the problem

Volunteer - ask if they can spend their time right now doing something to help

Give Perspective - point out that it's not that bad in the grand scheme of things or could have been much worse

Be Positive - stay optimistic and help you see the bright side despite

 
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Sharrock
Scoop.it!

Are Americans too liberal to love Bernie Sanders? Are Americans too liberal to love Bernie Sanders? - The Boston Globe

Are Americans too liberal to love Bernie Sanders? Are Americans too liberal to love Bernie Sanders? - The Boston Globe | Teacher Tools and Tips | Scoop.it
Liberalism, in fact, is our conservative tradition. There’s even a religious element here: Americans are endowed “by our Creator” with unalienable rights. The founding fathers even invented a kind of monarch: the Constitution. Citizens can completely disagree about what it says, but itself, it can do no wrong.

The second subtle point is that Americans are unconscious liberals. We are so Lockean we don’t even realize it. Liberal truths are self-evident. Of course, we haven’t read Locke, and Hartz himself doesn’t care quite what Locke said. We have absorbed the Locke that filters down to us so thoroughly we don’t know it.
Sharrock's insight:

"Liberal, in this classic sense, means we believe government exists to protect individuals’ life, liberty, and property — euphemistically “happiness” in the Declaration of Independence. We pragmatically stretch this concept some, but only so far. Uniquely among Western nations, Americans lack a proper conservative tradition stretching back to a feudal past, and because of that lack — strange as the logic may initially sound — we also lack a serious socialist tradition looking forward to a transformative future." (excerpt)

 

excerpt: "LIBERALISM FOR HARTZ was not welfare-state liberalism, but the liberalism of John Locke — requiring a timeless present. The opening phrases of the Declaration are worth a second look: “We hold these truths to be self-evident, that all men are created equal, that they are endowed by their Creator with certain unalienable Rights.” We in America establish government to protect individuals’ rights, and we can justly abolish it if it fails to." 


more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Sharrock
Scoop.it!

Genomic study of Indian populations finds five distinct ancestral components

Genomic study of Indian populations finds five distinct ancestral components | Teacher Tools and Tips | Scoop.it
(Phys.org)—A trio of researchers with the National Institute of BioMedical Genomics, in India has found via genetic study, five distinct ancestral components for the people of India.

 

The team reports that their study revealed that the four ancestral groups they found included what they describe as people of north and south Indian ancestries, people of Austro-Asiatic descent and people with Tibeto-Burman ancestries. Those from the islands were found to share genes with present-day Pacific Islanders. They also found evidence of the first Indians coming from Africa—another later wave of people came to the area from East and South Central Asia. They also found that the earliest people tended to intermingle for many years, sharing their genes across lineages, but that came to halt approximately 70 generations ago, which equated to approximately 1,575 years ago—the time period of the Gupta emperors, when the caste system was begun. Intermingling between the upper and lower castes diminished to the point that it could be seen in the genes of people alive today.

 

 

The researchers note that their study has revealed that Indian ancestry is far more genetically diverse than has been thought and also point out that they have shown that shifts in societal practices can lead to changes in the genomes of the people that live there, over many generations.



Read more at: http://phys.org/news/2016-01-genomic-indian-populations-distinct-ancestral.html#jCpIn their paper published in Proceedings ...

Sharrock's insight:

excerpt highlighted: "they have shown that shifts in societal practices can lead to changes in the genomes of the people that live there, over many generations."

 

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Sharrock
Scoop.it!

Recognizing and Overcoming False Growth Mindset

Recognizing and Overcoming False Growth Mindset | Teacher Tools and Tips | Scoop.it
In the wake of the many exciting research results, educators became increasingly interested in promoting a growth mindset among their students. This was extremely gratifying. To see some of the great successes was even more gratifying. However, I slowly became aware that not all educators understood the concept fully.
Sharrock's insight:

Among the many misinterpretations and loss of fidelity, I found this issue most probable--excerpt: 

Blaming the Student's Mindset

Perhaps the most discouraging thing that I've heard is how some educators are blaming children's mindsets for their failure to learn. A parent recently wrote me a heartrending letter. Her daughter had been in a wonderful school that, using growth mindset principles, made her feel like an effective learner, even when learning came slowly and with difficulty. She then went to a different school, where children were scolded and shamed -- in the name of a growth mindset -- for not persevering and learning effectively.

It is the educator's task to create a growth mindset classroom. In the safety of these classrooms, students can begin to leave behind their fixed mindset and try out the idea that they can develop their abilities. We see this happening when teachers give students:

Meaningful workHonest and helpful feedbackAdvice on future learning strategiesOpportunities to revise their work and show their learning
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Sharrock
Scoop.it!

The area of this map coloured red has the same population as the area coloured blue

The area of this map coloured red has the same population as the area coloured blue | Teacher Tools and Tips | Scoop.it

Well, this is kind of crazy. Only 5 per cent of the world's population lives in the regions of this map shaded blue. Another 5 per cent lives in the area shaded red. Yoinks.

Sharrock's insight:

Geography, population

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Sharrock
Scoop.it!

The Golden Ratio: Design's Biggest Myth

The Golden Ratio: Design's Biggest Myth | Teacher Tools and Tips | Scoop.it
"Strictly speaking, it's impossible for anything in the real-world to fall into the golden ratio, because it's an irrational number," says Keith Devlin, a professor of mathematics at Stanford University. You can get close with more standard aspect ratios. The iPad's 3:2 display, or the 16:9 display on your HDTV all "float around it," Devlin says. But the golden ratio is like pi. Just as it's impossible to find a perfect circle in the real world, the golden ratio cannot strictly be applied to any real world object. It's always going to be a little off.
Sharrock's insight:

This is going to anger a lot of people...

 

"Zeising's theories became extremely popular, "the 19th-century equivalent of the Mozart Effect," according to Devlin, referring to the belief that listening to classical music improves your intelligence. And it never really went away. In the 20th century, the famous Swiss-French architect Le Corbusier based his Modulor system of anthropometric proportions on the golden ratio. Dalí painted his masterpiece The Sacrament of the Last Supper on a canvas shaped like a golden rectangle. Meanwhile, art historians started combing back through the great designs of history, trying to retroactively apply the golden ratio to Stonehenge, Rembrandt, the Chatres Cathedral, and Seurat. The link between the golden ratio and beauty has been a canard of the world of art, architecture, and design ever since."

more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Sharrock from Everything Photographic
Scoop.it!

Winners of the 2015 National Geographic Photo Contest

Winners of the 2015 National Geographic Photo Contest | Teacher Tools and Tips | Scoop.it
National Geographic Magazine just announce the winners of this year's photo contest.

Via Tiaan Jonker
Sharrock's insight:

photos for use in education...

more...
ZikoShop's comment, December 31, 2015 4:40 PM
Photo Editing
Learn photo Editing.
33 professional photoshop tutorials
http://tinyurl.com/phmjhjn
Rescooped by Sharrock from Internet Tools for Language Learning
Scoop.it!

Sway: Create and share interactive reports, presentations, personal stories, and more.

Sway: Create and share interactive reports, presentations, personal stories, and more. | Teacher Tools and Tips | Scoop.it
Sway is an easy-to-use digital storytelling app for creating interactive reports, presentations, personal stories and more. Its built-in design engine helps you create professional designs in minutes. With Sway, your images, text, videos, and other multimedia all flow together in a way that enhances your story. Sway makes sure your creations look great on any screen.

Via RitaZ
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Sharrock from Internet Tools for Language Learning
Scoop.it!

English Grammar Activities App Helps Students Learn Grammar Rules | Edudemic

English Grammar Activities App Helps Students Learn Grammar Rules | Edudemic | Teacher Tools and Tips | Scoop.it
Compared to other grammar apps, English Grammar in Use is more authoritative and exhaustive, with 306 activities and 2,800+ questions.

Via RitaZ
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Sharrock
Scoop.it!

The map is the work of Johan Åhlfeldt, a researcher at Sweden's Lund University, who built it using sources including the  Barrington Atlas of the Greek and Roman World and the Pleides dataset. In ...

The map is the work of Johan Åhlfeldt, a researcher at Sweden's Lund University, who built it using sources including the  Barrington Atlas of the Greek and Roman World and the Pleides dataset. In ... | Teacher Tools and Tips | Scoop.it
If you're anything like me, you'll have spent many years fretting over a single vexed question: What's the best route from Camulodunum to Korinion? Should you take the direct route via Verlamium? Or the more southerly one, through Londinium?
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Sharrock
Scoop.it!

Charlie Hebdo Editor: Europe's Problem Is Racism, Not Islamophobia

Charlie Hebdo Editor: Europe's Problem Is Racism, Not Islamophobia | Teacher Tools and Tips | Scoop.it
Okay, so Mouloud and Gérard are Muslims. Mouloud is of North African extraction and comes from a Muslim family; Gérard is of European origin and comes from a Catholic family. Gérard has converted to Islam. Both are trying to rent the same apartment. Assuming they have similar incomes, which of the two Muslims is more likely to get the apartment? The Arab-looking fellow or the white guy? It’s not the Muslim who will be turned away; it’s the Arab. The fact that the Arab bears no outward sign of belonging to the Muslim faith changes nothing. Yet what does the anti-Islamophobia activist do? He charges religious discrimination instead of decrying racism….
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Sharrock
Scoop.it!

How To Cite Social Media In Scholarly Writing

How To Cite Social Media In Scholarly Writing | Teacher Tools and Tips | Scoop.it
How To Cite Social Media In Scholarly Writing
Sharrock's insight:

Citation Style

Of course, citation style matters, and the two most popular are the APA and MLA.

The APA (American Psychological Association) has their rules for citing social media in academic writing. They even have a thorough ($12) guide to clarify the process, while the MLA (Modern Language Association), as far as we can tell, has yet to expressly address apps and social media as anything other than “software.”

And to an extent, this makes sense. As media becomes more nuanced, new modalities emerge, authors use new channels to distribute their thinking–and even as the “crowd” becomes a legitimate source of information (see wikipedia, twitter, erc.), new rules for governing that reality will continue to emerge. The more general those rules are, the less reactive governing bodies will have to be moment by moment.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Sharrock
Scoop.it!

5-Minute Film Festival: We the Economy

5-Minute Film Festival: We the Economy | Teacher Tools and Tips | Scoop.it
We interact with the economy every day, but how well do we really understand it? This new video series aims to change that, with 20 short films explaining concepts like debt, money, and supply and demand.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Sharrock
Scoop.it!

Modern Professional Learning: Connecting PLCs With PLNs

Modern Professional Learning: Connecting PLCs With PLNs | Teacher Tools and Tips | Scoop.it
Typically a Professional Learning Community is "a group of educators that meets regularly, shares expertise, and works collaboratively to improve teaching skills and the academic performance of students."

But this isn't a "book group." A PLC is made up of "a school's professional staff members who continuously seek to find answers through inquiry and act on their learning to improve student learning." (Huffman and Hipp 2003)
Sharrock's insight:

excerpt:

Sometimes PLCs can experience challenges such as:

A limited inflow of ideasBeing a closed network including only those at the schoolLimited in real conversations about real problems by school politicsAn unwillingness to try new things or accept new ideas
more...
No comment yet.