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Pecan, Caramel, Crawfish: Food Dialect Maps

Pecan, Caramel, Crawfish: Food Dialect Maps | Teacher Tools and Tips | Scoop.it
"ALL-monds," "AH-monds," or "I say something between 'l' and nothing"
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Teacher Tools and Tips
Tools, tips and practices to share with teachers
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Teacher Reviewed Educational Apps for 2012 - We Are Teachers

Teacher Reviewed Educational Apps for 2012 - We Are Teachers | Teacher Tools and Tips | Scoop.it
Reviews and best practices from teachers who have used apps.

Via Dr. Susan Bainbridge
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Using Film to Teach Analysis Skills

Using Film to Teach Analysis Skills | Teacher Tools and Tips | Scoop.it
Bring real-world authenticity to literacy analysis by including movie criticism in your lessons.
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Earth's surprise inside: The inner core seems to have its own inner core

Earth's surprise inside: The inner core seems to have its own inner core | Teacher Tools and Tips | Scoop.it

Thanks to a novel application of earthquake-reading technology, a research team at the University of Illinois and colleagues at Nanjing University in China have found that the Earth’s inner core has an inner core of its own, which has surprising properties that could reveal information about our planet. 

Led by Xiaodong Song, a professor of geology at the U. of I., and visiting postdoctoral researcher Tao Wang, the team published its work in the journal Nature Geoscience on Feb. 9. 

“Even though the inner core is small – smaller than the moon – it has some really interesting features,” said Song. “It may tell us about how our planet formed, its history, and other dynamic processes of the Earth. It shapes our understanding of what’s going on deep inside the Earth.”

Researchers use seismic waves from earthquakes to scan below the planet’s surface, much like doctors use ultrasound to see inside patients. The team used a technology that gathers data not from the initial shock of an earthquake, but from the waves that resonate in the earthquake’s aftermath. The earthquake is like a hammer striking a bell; much like a listener hears the clear tone that resonates after the bell strike, seismic sensors collect a coherent signal in the earthquake’s coda. 


Via Dr. Stefan Gruenwald
Sharrock's insight:

Does this mean Earth Science and geology books might need a small revision?

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Sensorimotor Recalibration Depends on Attribution of Sensory Prediction Errors to Internal Causes

Sensorimotor Recalibration Depends on Attribution of Sensory Prediction Errors to Internal Causes | Teacher Tools and Tips | Scoop.it

Sensorimotor learning critically depends on error signals. Learning usually tries to minimise these error signals to guarantee optimal performance. Errors can, however, have both internal causes, resulting from one’s sensorimotor system, and external causes, resulting from external disturbances. Does learning take into account the perceived cause of error information? Here, we investigated the recalibration of internal predictions about the sensory consequences of one’s actions. Since these predictions underlie the distinction of self- and externally produced sensory events, we assumed them to be recalibrated only by prediction errors attributed to internal causes. When subjects were confronted with experimentally induced visual prediction errors about their pointing movements in virtual reality, they recalibrated the predicted visual consequences of their movements. Recalibration was not proportional to the externally generated prediction error, but correlated with the error component which subjects attributed to internal causes. We also revealed adaptation in subjects’ motor performance which reflected their recalibrated sensory predictions. Thus, causal attribution of error information is essential for sensorimotor learning.


Via Ashish Umre
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Statistics is the fastest-growing undergraduate STEM degree

Statistics is the fastest-growing undergraduate STEM degree | Teacher Tools and Tips | Scoop.it
Statistics—the science of learning from data—is the fastest-growing science, technology, engineering and math (STEM) undergraduate degree in the United States over the last four years, an analysis of federal government education data conducted by...
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Google Earth Pro now available free for all users

Google Earth Pro now available free for all users | Teacher Tools and Tips | Scoop.it
Google Earth Pro is free now, there are no such barriers to using the software.
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Intensity and Being Creative | Developing Multiple Talents

Intensity and Being Creative | Developing Multiple Talents | Teacher Tools and Tips | Scoop.it

A personality trait that may often accompany high sensitivity (experienced by many, or most, creative people) is high intensity.

 

Nicole Kidman gave a nice description of what many other actors and other artists experience: “You live with a lot of complicated emotions as an actor, and they whirl around you and create havoc at times. And yet...you’re consciously and unconsciously allowing that to happen."

 

Psychologist Eric Maisel says that ‘smart’ people often experience challenges with personality and a racing brain that "may be flowing directly from your natural endowment.”


Via Douglas Eby
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10 Thinking Errors That Will Crush Your Mental Strength

10 Thinking Errors That Will Crush Your Mental Strength | Teacher Tools and Tips | Scoop.it
... and how to overcome them.

 

Mental strength requires a three-pronged approach—managing our thoughts,regulating our emotions, and behaving productively despite our circumstances.


While all three areas can be a struggle, it's often our thoughts that make it most difficult to be mentally strong. 

 

As we go about our daily routines, our internal monologue narrates our experience. Our self-talk guides our behavior and influences the way we interact with others. It also plays a major role in how you feel about yourself, other people, and the world in general.

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We Are Wired to Be Kind: How Evolution Gave Us Empathy, Compassion & Gratitude

We Are Wired to Be Kind: How Evolution Gave Us Empathy, Compassion & Gratitude | Teacher Tools and Tips | Scoop.it
Empathy, compassion and gratitude — these traits don’t usually spring to mind when you think about Darwinism and natural selection.

 

No, your mind more immediately drifts toward anti-social characteristics like competition, survival of the fittest, and selfishness (as in the “selfish gene”)

 

 But above, on the first day of 2015, UC Berkeley psychologist Dacher Keltner reminds us that evolution can bring out the best in us, and Darwin recognized that. As Darwin wrote in The Descent of Man, the strengthening of our capacity for “sympathy” played a central role in human evolution:


Via Edwin Rutsch
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Why Students Think They Understand When They Don't

Why Students Think They Understand When They Don't | Teacher Tools and Tips | Scoop.it
Although familiarity and recollection are different, an insidious effect of familiarity is that it can give you the feeling that you know something when you really don't. For example, it has been shown that if some key words of a question are familiar, you are more likely to think that you know the answer to the question. In one experiment demonstrating this effect (Reder, 1987), subjects were exposed to a variety of word pairs (e.g. "golf" and "par") and then asked to complete a short task that required them to think at least for a moment about the words. Next, subjects saw a set of trivia questions, some of which used words that the subjects had just been exposed to in the previous task. Subjects were asked to make a rapid judgment as to whether or not they knew the answer to the question — and then they were to provide the answer.
Sharrock's insight:

The author suggests: "teachers can help students test their own knowledge in ways that provide more accurate assessments of what they really know — which enables students to better judge when they have mastered material and when (and where) more work is required." 


Self-learning or autodidactic pursuits can suffer for a number of reasons. This articles describes one reason. We also need to be aware of rhetorical fallacies and cognitive biases. We need others--sometimes groups of others--who can challenge our fallacious beliefs and biases. As knowledge is valued for how it deals with complex issues, we also need to support our perspectives and premises rigorously and with validity. 

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10 Things You Should Know About Joseph Warren

10 Things You Should Know About Joseph Warren | Teacher Tools and Tips | Scoop.it
Learn 10 surprising facts about the oft-forgotten Sons of Liberty leader who died in battle before the United States was even born.
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Why Curiosity Enhances Learning

Why Curiosity Enhances Learning | Teacher Tools and Tips | Scoop.it

"It's no secret that curiosity makes learning more effective and enjoyable. Curious students not only ask questions, but also actively seek out the answers. Without curiosity, Sir Isaac Newton would have never formulated the laws of physics, Alexander Fleming probably wouldn't have discovered penicillin, and Marie Curie's pioneering research on radioactivity may not exist. Recently, researchers from the University of California, Davis conducted a series of experiments to discover what exactly goes on in the brain when our curiosity is aroused. For the study, the researchers had participants rate how curious they were to learn the answers to more than 100 trivia questions, such as 'What Beatles single lasted longest on the charts, at 19 weeks?' or 'What does the term 'dinosaur' actually mean?' At certain points throughout the study, fMRI scans were carried out to see what was happening in the brain when participants felt particularly curious about the answer to a question. So what did these experiments reveal? 1. Curiosity prepares the brain for learning, and 2. Curiosity makes subsequent learning more rewarding." | by Marianne Stenger


Via Todd Reimer
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How to Handle Stress in the Moment

How to Handle Stress in the Moment | Teacher Tools and Tips | Scoop.it
Silence the negative voice in your head.

Via Eileen Easterly
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Eileen Easterly's curator insight, January 22, 9:44 AM

We often get tips on how to handle stress -- in the future -- but what do you do when it's happening right now? This article helps give you some solid ideas of how to handle stress at work while you are feeling it the most!

Sharrock's curator insight, January 22, 12:40 PM

attn School leaders

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There's Such a Thing as a Flavorist, and 9 Other Awesome Food Jobs

There's Such a Thing as a Flavorist, and 9 Other Awesome Food Jobs | Teacher Tools and Tips | Scoop.it
Try to name 10 food industry jobs, and the majority of them will probably involve either writing or working in a restaurant. But, in reality, the playing field is incredibly vast. Every single food item that you’ll find in a supermarket needs to be invented, developed, and tested; every element of a restaurant needs to be expertly planned; and every food product needs to look great when it’s on television or in an advertisement. And that’s just the tip of the iceberg.
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50 Free Animation Tools And Resources For Digital Learners

50 Free Animation Tools And Resources For Digital Learners | Teacher Tools and Tips | Scoop.it
50 Free Animation Tools And Resources For Digital Learners
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38 maps that explain Europe

38 maps that explain Europe | Teacher Tools and Tips | Scoop.it
Europe, as both a place and a concept, has changed dramatically in its centuries of history.

 

Tags: Europe, map.


Via Seth Dixon
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Bob Beaven's curator insight, February 19, 2:24 PM

These 38 different maps show how Europe, and the understanding of the continent (and what is East and West) changes overtime.  Today, the Greeks are closely aligned with Western Europe (they are after all considered the birthplace of the Western World), however this was not always the case as shown in Map 6.  In the days of the Byzantine Empire, the Greeks were competing with their Western European counterparts, and the Eastern Roman Empire long out survived its Western Counterpart.  Another interesting map to understanding why Europe is comprised of such small countries is all the different peoples that live in the region.  In the British Isles for example, there are Scots, English, Welsh and Irish (not to mention Cornish which map 13 excludes).  The Iberian Peninsula is no more united than the British Isles, Portuguese, Gallacians, Spanish, and Catalans all live in the region.  The modern country of Spain, in fact, comprises a union of Spanish, Gallacians and Catalans, with the Portuguese inhabiting a country of their own.  Europe is so difficult to understand as many diverse people have inhabited the area for so long, each leaving their mark on the individual  countries.  Europe is puzzling, and rightly so, for American observers.    

Padriag John-David Mahoney's curator insight, February 19, 3:17 PM

Despite the number of maps and figures, this is a really nice, condensed  broad stroke  of European history and politics, geography, and some economies. It's  also, for me, very entertaining.

Louis Mazza's curator insight, February 26, 7:49 PM

Europe was once the most war torn nation, but is now known for its peace. This article’s introduction says that Europe has relative great prosperity but at the same time deep economic turmoil. I guess like everywhere else. This is a collection of 38 maps that show Europe in different stages of development to give the reader a better understanding. The first maps shows the countries that make up the EU. NATO’s growth is show in the second map from 1949 to 2009. Some maps show the unemployment rates, while others show who in Europe uses the Euro. Mine home country of Italy is shown in the lowest category of unemployment in the southern region. Other maps illustrate the histories of Europe starting in 117. AD. I think that this collection of maps is awesome for gathering knowledge on Europe. It sure is teaching me a lot.

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Why Is The Dollar Sign A Letter S?

Why Is The Dollar Sign A Letter S? | Teacher Tools and Tips | Scoop.it
The letter S appears nowhere in the word "dollar", yet an S with a line through it ($) is unmistakably the dollar sign. But why an S?
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The Common Core Has Not Killed Literature

The Common Core Has Not Killed Literature | Teacher Tools and Tips | Scoop.it
Jaume Escofet/Flickr By now almost every teacher in the country has experienced the Common Core State Standards. We’re teaching and assessing them; we’re advocating for them or pushing against them.
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DC middle schoolers protest instructors fired for allegedly teaching too much ... - Raw Story

DC middle schoolers protest instructors fired for allegedly teaching too much ... - Raw Story | Teacher Tools and Tips | Scoop.it
Raw Story
DC middle schoolers protest instructors fired for allegedly teaching too much ...
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Gifted children get ignored in school despite huge future contribution ...

Gifted children get ignored in school despite huge future contribution ... | Teacher Tools and Tips | Scoop.it
The authors of the largest ever study of the profoundly gifted question whether the education system is providing enough support for highly talented young people. The US study, published in the journal Psychological Science, ...

Via Douglas Eby
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iPamba's curator insight, January 12, 2014 9:51 AM

Do children with learning difficulties automatically receive extra help? Experiences often suggest otherwise. And we should be careful to resist any tendency to simplify complex realities into either/or polarities. Learning difficulties may co-exist with giftedness, and giftedness may be concealed behind poverty and other social and emotional roadblocks. Education systems and measures are not neutral. Were we to invest resources into enabling each child to blossom and grow, our future would be less dependent on nurturing the full potential of the relative few who meet the standard criteria and measures for giftedness. 

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Scaffolding

Scaffolding | Teacher Tools and Tips | Scoop.it
This work by Mia MacMeekin is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivs 3.0 Unported License.
Sharrock's insight:

This is one of the ways teachers are valuable. A learner cannot easily (if at alll) scaffold one's own learning alone. 

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7 Good Examples of Gamification in Education - EdTechReview™ (ETR)

7 Good Examples of Gamification in Education - EdTechReview™ (ETR) | Teacher Tools and Tips | Scoop.it
Various edtech companies are working for some effective ways to create process of learning “fun”. Here are some of the good examples of gamification in education.
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What's A Learning Simulation?

What's A Learning Simulation? | Teacher Tools and Tips | Scoop.it
Clark Aldrich: A learning simulation is an experience designed to rigorously help users develop competence and conviction.   A learning simulation is a combination of modeling elements, entertainment (or game) elements, and instructional (or pedagogical) elements.  These can range from pure media (which do not involve any other humans), to experiences that use coaches, teammates, competitors, and communities.

Learning simulations historically have fallen into two categories.  There are educational simulations that follow the rigor and fidelity of a flight simulators.  And there are serious games, that follow the entertainment model of a SimCity.
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How Anxiety Leads to Disruptive Behavior | Child Mind Institute

How Anxiety Leads to Disruptive Behavior | Child Mind Institute | Teacher Tools and Tips | Scoop.it
But what's really going on? "It turns out, after an evaluation, that he is off the charts for social anxiety," reports Dr. Jerry Bubrick, director of the Anxiety & Mood Disorders Center at the Child Mind Institute. "He can't tolerate any—even constructive—criticism. He just will shut down altogether. James is terrified of being embarrassed, so when a boy says something that makes him uncomfortable, he has no skills to deal with it, and he freaks out. Flight or fight."
James's story illustrates something that parents and teachers may not realize—that disruptive behavior is often generated by unrecognized anxiety. A child who appears to be oppositional or aggressive may be reacting to anxiety—anxiety he may, depending on his age, not be able to articulate effectively, or not even fully recognize that he's feeling.
"Especially in younger kids with anxiety you might see freezing and clinging kind of behavior," says Dr. Rachel Busman, a clinical psychologist at the Child Mind Institute, "but you can also see tantrums and complete meltdowns."
Sharrock's insight:

It is important to consider this possibility, especially because of the power of labels. People have a tendency to write-off others when they diagnose them as oppositional or emotionally disabled. It's like they think the child is beyond their responsibility or expertise once they have a special education classification. Not that anxiety is any better as a label. We might make the mistake of handing the anxious child off to the school psychologist or social worker. 

 

Nevertheless, it's helpful to understand that the kid isn't actively working to sabotage instruction. 

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Khan Academy for iPad Updated: Brings 150K Learning Exercises & More | iPad Insight

Khan Academy for iPad Updated: Brings 150K Learning Exercises & More | iPad Insight | Teacher Tools and Tips | Scoop.it
The wonderful Khan Academy iPad app has been updated this week, to Version 2.0.

This is a major update for an already superb educational app. It brings access to everything that’s available at Khan Academy online – including some 150,000 learning exercises as well as personalized recommendations.

Khan Academy is a great educational tool for all ages; the iPad version has always been a great app – and now it’s even better.

Via John Evans
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Kerry Muste's curator insight, January 22, 11:12 PM

Khan Academy is a great resource for blended learning.

AnnC's curator insight, January 25, 9:51 PM

Khan Academy just keeps getting better!

elearning at eCampus ULg's curator insight, January 26, 10:00 AM

Excellent new, please enroll anyone in your family, this is an can't miss 

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SPD and the Sense of Touch

SPD and the Sense of Touch | Teacher Tools and Tips | Scoop.it
Sensory Processing Disorder affects people in an array of different ways. A tag in his clothes or an askew sock can send my son into a meltdown. How does it affect your child’s sense of touch?

Via Tonya at Therapy Fun Zone
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