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This Japanese Latte Art Will Leave You Speechless [PICTURES]

This Japanese Latte Art Will Leave You Speechless [PICTURES] | Teacher Tools and Tips | Scoop.it
You wish your coffee looked this good.
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Swati Lahiri M.Ed (Curriculum Design)'s comment, June 4, 2013 6:47 AM
I really have no words for such creativity where it can be used in almost every day in life situations and not strictly be restricted to workplace and learning institutions- after all this is where we all want our minds to go...
Teacher Tools and Tips
Tools, tips and practices to share with teachers
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Teacher Reviewed Educational Apps for 2012 - We Are Teachers

Teacher Reviewed Educational Apps for 2012 - We Are Teachers | Teacher Tools and Tips | Scoop.it
Reviews and best practices from teachers who have used apps.

Via Dr. Susan Bainbridge
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Teaching Math to People Who Think They Hate It

Teaching Math to People Who Think They Hate It | Teacher Tools and Tips | Scoop.it
If we only teach conceptual approaches to math without developing skill at actually solving math problems, students will feel weak. Their mathematical powers will be flimsy. And if they don't memorize anything, if they don't know the basic facts of addition and multiplication or, later, geometry or still later, calculus, it becomes impossible for them to be creative. It's like in music. You need to have technique before you can create a composition of your own. But if all we do is teach technique, no one will want to play music at all.
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How to Determine the Correct Things to Focus On

How to Determine the Correct Things to Focus On | Teacher Tools and Tips | Scoop.it
Everyone wants to know the right time to simplify and focus on one thing, but nobody does. That’s what makes success so hard. Entrepreneurship isn’t like baking a cake. There is no recipe. There is no guidebook. 
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3 Ways to Model Academic Discourse for High School Students

3 Ways to Model Academic Discourse for High School Students | Teacher Tools and Tips | Scoop.it
Have students compare/contrast popular journal articles with scholarly articles. Have students list their observations.  Great databases to use for popular journals: Newsela and Proquest.  Great databases for scholarly articles: Jstor and Google Scholar. Students will usually note (among the possibilities): a Works Cited page in scholarly articles (although sources will be cited informally in popular journal articles, students will not see formal citations with bibliography in popular journal ar
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11885205_10153448723186291_480057870208840567_n.jpg (625×903)

11885205_10153448723186291_480057870208840567_n.jpg (625×903) | Teacher Tools and Tips | Scoop.it

Being introverted is not being socially awkward, shy, too serious, or are missing the skills of extroverts. I'm not sure what a "book nerd" is though.

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President Obama’s Letter to the Editor - NYTimes.com

President Obama’s Letter to the Editor - NYTimes.com | Teacher Tools and Tips | Scoop.it
Congress must restore the Voting Rights Act. Our state leaders and legislatures must make it easier — not harder — for more Americans to have their voices heard. Above all, we must exercise our right as citizens to vote, for the truth is that too often we disenfranchise ourselves.
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How To Build An Effective Culture | Digital Tonto

How To Build An Effective Culture | Digital Tonto | Teacher Tools and Tips | Scoop.it
All too often, culture is mistaken for history.  It is not.  Strong cultures are able to accept and adapt to change.
Sharrock's insight:

These concepts should be used for teacher training as well as school leadership training. Everyone involved in hiring should also consider the research in the power of diversity in networks. We should develop interviewing and appreciation for shared values over shared characteristics.

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The year abroad 2.0: how technology is changing foreign study

The year abroad 2.0: how technology is changing foreign study | Teacher Tools and Tips | Scoop.it
Technology can help combat loneliness – but won’t solve all the problems you encounter
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The Definition of Insanity is...

The Definition of Insanity is... | Teacher Tools and Tips | Scoop.it
Where did this saying come from? It's attributed to Albert Einstein (probably not (link is external)), Benjamin Franklin (probably not (link is external)), Mark Twain (probably not (link is external)) and mystery writer Rita Mae Brown (probably so (link is external)) who used it in her novel Sudden Death (link is external). It's not clear who said it first, but according to at least one blogger (link is external) it's "the dumbest thing a smart person ever said." The catchy saying has gathered steam in the past few years (example I (link is external), II (link is external), III (link is external)), and regardless of the source, it's gotten a lot of mileage.
Sharrock's insight:

I totally agree with the statement above.I found this article while researching my own response to this ridiculous statement. 

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5 Things I Learned Working in a Restaurant Kitchen

5 Things I Learned Working in a Restaurant Kitchen | Teacher Tools and Tips | Scoop.it
nobody becomes a chef for the money, they do it for the thrill, the creativity, and the energy.
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How to fix a broken system

How to fix a broken system | Teacher Tools and Tips | Scoop.it

re: The financial crisis

 

"The origins of the crisis lie in the revolutionary changes in the structure of the global economy and finance in the 1990s and early 2000s (these are the “shifts” of the book’s title). The macroeconomic shift was the emergence of a “savings glut” as countries from China to Germany saved more than they invested, pushing down real interest rates. Both at a global level and within the euro area financial innovation and freer capital mobility transformed these excess savings into huge cross-border capital flows, sending asset prices and credit soaring and, in the process, creating an inherently fragile financial system. Unfettered finance transformed the savings glut into a credit bubble. And in both cases the bursting of that bubble worsened the savings glut, as households, companies and governments in Europe slashed their spending.

"Mr Wolf argues that the post-crisis recovery has been feeble because too many policymakers failed to understand this dynamic. Rather than accepting that bigger fiscal deficits would be the natural counterweight to private thrift, politicians pushed for austerity. Far too little emphasis was put on restructuring unpayable debts. At the same time, the underlying causes of the savings glut have, if anything, become stronger as deeper factors such as rising inequality have kept overall spending weak. Larry Summers, a Harvard economist, has argued that the rich world faces “secular stagnation”. Mr Wolf also believes that weak demand is here to stay. So, too, is the fragility of finance. Despite “manic rule making” he argues that banks are still a powder keg, with insufficient capital, and are liable to wreak havoc when they blow up.

Sharrock's insight:

excerpt: "[Mr. Wolf's] more moderate suggestions include requiring banks to hold vastly more capital and the creation of insurance schemes that allow emerging economies, the most plausible engines of demand, to import capital safely and sustainably. But moderate change may not be enough. Pushing his analysis to its logical conclusion, he argues that the only way to deal with today’s underlying problems—a fragile financial system and a secular weakness in demand—may be to move away from bank-based credit altogether and rely on permanent budget deficits financed by central banks. Forcing banks to match their deposits with safe government bonds would reduce the risks of bank crashes and encourage a healthier reliance on equity finance. Permanent money-financed deficits would, in turn, provide a safer way to sustain spending than private-asset booms and busts. If done responsibly, they need not cause inflation."

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A broken system

A broken system | Teacher Tools and Tips | Scoop.it
Nicaragua’s police force is in danger of giving socialism a good name. The country is one of the poorest in the hemisphere. Yet its annual murder rate, 11 per 100,000 people, is among the lowest in Latin America and eight times lower than in neighbouring Honduras (see map).
Sharrock's insight:

This article should be explored as a contribution to the debate on Justice systems--criminal justice and the penal system. It might be seen as an argument against the politically conservative attitudes toward criminals. To develop a more sophisticated argument, narratives and case studies should be found and used. 

 

On the other hand, the same article presents cases that support aggressive approaches against crime, like Rio de Janeiro's "pacification policy", in addition to progressive approaches that include education and social programs.

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When Mexicans crossed our border to feed Americans in need

When Mexicans crossed our border to feed Americans in need | Teacher Tools and Tips | Scoop.it
For three weeks after Katrina, Mexican soldiers helped thousands of displaced Americans in Texas.
Sharrock's insight:
"the Mexican soldiers were on a relief mission to feed tens of thousands of homeless and hungry Americans displaced by Hurricane Katrina. Setting up camp at a former Air Force base outside San Antonio, they distributed potable water, medical supplies and 7,000 hot meals a day for the next three weeks." (Excerpt )
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Study: There Are Instructions for Teaching Critical Thinking | Big Think

Study: There Are Instructions for Teaching Critical Thinking | Big Think | Teacher Tools and Tips | Scoop.it
Whether or not you can teach something as subjective as critical thinking has been up for debate, but a fascinating new study shows that it’s actually quite possible. Experiments performed by Stanford's Department of Physics and Graduate School of Education demonstrate that students can be instructed to think more critically.

It’s difficult to overstate the importance of critical-thinking skills in modern society. The ability to decipher information and interpret it, offering creative solutions, is in direct relation to our intellect.
The study took two groups of students in an introductory physics laboratory course, with one group (known as the experimental group) given the instruction to use quantitative comparisons between datasets and the other group given no instruction (the control group). Comparing data in a scientific manner; that is, being able to measure one’s observations in a statistical or mathematical way, led to interesting results for the experimental group.Even after these instructions were removed, they were 12 times more likely to offer creative solutions to improve the experimental methods being used in the class, four times more likely to explain the limitations of the methods, and better at explaining their reasoning than the control group. The results remained consistent even in the next year, with students in a different class. So what does this imply about critical thinking, and how can we utilize these findings to improve ourselves and our society?

We live in an age with unprecedented access to information. Whether you are contributing to an entry on Wikipedia or reading a meme that has no sources cited (do they ever?), your ability to comprehend what you are reading and weigh it is a constant and consistent need. That is why it is so imperative that we have sharp critical-thinking skills. Also, if you don’t use them, you will have nothing to argue with your family about at Thanksgiving. More importantly, it keeps your brain from nomming on junk food and on more of a kale-based diet. Look at any trending topic, and test yourself. Is this true/accurate? How do I know either way? Is there a way I can use data (provable, factual information) to figure this out?

Certainly, we can train ourselves to become better critical thinkers, but it’s also important that we teach these skills to kids. Studies have shown how important this ability is to our success, and yet many feel that we’re doing a terrible job of teaching it. This study, however, may lead to educators and parents realizing that these skills are teachable. The implications of a better thinking society are not quantitative, but I do believe they would be extraordinary.

Via Wildcat2030
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12 (Not So) Surprising Benefits of Play | Michele Borba

12 (Not So) Surprising Benefits of Play | Michele Borba | Teacher Tools and Tips | Scoop.it
Parenting expert, Dr. Michele Borba, describes 12 reasons why today's over-scheduled, over-supervised, plugged in, too stressed kids need to play.
Sharrock's insight:

" play is not only disappearing from our homes and neighborhoods, but our schools as well. And this comes at the same time when reports show that stress is mounting to  new heights in our kids while their mental health has plummeted to a twenty-five year all-time low. A good old fashioned childhood of cloud-gazing, leaf-kicking, and hill rolling is disappearing to be replaced by screens, earplugs, flashcards and tutors."

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3 Small Discipline Habits You Can Train : zen habits

While I’m not a fan of trying to be disciplined every moment of the day, there’s no doubt most of us could use a little more discipline in our lives.
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Operationalization - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

Operationalization

In research design, especially in psychology, social sciences, life sciences, and physics, operationalization is a process of defining the measurement of a phenomenon that is not directly measurable, though its existence is indicated by other phenomena.

In research design, especially in psychology, social sciences, life sciences, and physics, operationalization is a process of defining the measurement of a phenomenon that is not directly measurable, though its existence is indicated by other phenomena. It is the process of defining a fuzzy concept so as to make the theoretical concept clearly distinguishable or measurable, and to understand it in terms of empirical observations. In a wider sense, it refers to the process of specifying the extension of a concept—describing what is and is not a part of that concept. For example, in medicine, the phenomenon of health might be operationalized by one or more indicators like body mass index or tobacco smoking. Thus, some phenomena are directly difficult to observe (i.e. they are latent), but their existence can be inferred by means of their observable effects.
Sharrock's insight:

This was not what I thought it was. And the definition and exploration of this concept is facinating.

 

 

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Paying Attention to Burnout

Paying Attention to Burnout | Teacher Tools and Tips | Scoop.it
It is disturbing when you begin to hate something you love.One day you wake to realize you feel differently about your work or organization. The progression to that point may have been subtle, even unnoticed. Yet the outcome is difficult to evade. This is exactly how I would describe my past struggle with burnout. You find that you longer feel energized by your work. You may feel angry, or listless. In fact, the thought of your role may bring a vision of running in the opposite direction.Burnout
Sharrock's insight:

"The antecedents of burnout are varied — and workload is just one of them. Pioneering work completed by Social Psychologist Christina Maslach, revealed that burnout can be influenced by a number of key workplace elements (she discusses six), including insufficient rewards or acknowledgement, a lack of control over one's work, fairness, or a role that doesn't align with who we are. All could contribute to burnout — and they do. Every single day." (excerpt)

 

Note the mix of intrinsic and extrinsic acknowledgements and rewards. It's not just about intrinsic motivation. What do you think?

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What’s the ‘Sweet Spot’ of Difficulty For Learning?

What’s the ‘Sweet Spot’ of Difficulty For Learning? | Teacher Tools and Tips | Scoop.it

Parents and teachers wrestle with all the time: Should we be making learning easier for kids—or harder? The answer, according to research in cognitive science and psychology, is both.


Via Cindy Riley Klages, Mark E. Deschaine, PhD
Sharrock's insight:

"Should we make learning easier or harder for students?"

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Mark E. Deschaine, PhD's curator insight, August 9, 5:59 PM

"Should we make learning easier or harder for students?"

Jocelyn Stoller's curator insight, August 10, 2:32 AM

"Should we make learning easier or harder for students?"

christopher cyril's curator insight, August 10, 4:34 AM

"Should we make learning easier or harder for students?"

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Do We Really Have High Expectations for All?

Do We Really Have High Expectations for All? | Teacher Tools and Tips | Scoop.it
When it comes to high expectations, learning consultant Barbara Blackburn says actions speak louder than beliefs. Using her own classroom mistakes as a backdrop, she points out the teacher behavior...
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11 Reasons Why It’s So Hard Being A Lawyer (Part I)

11 Reasons Why It’s So Hard Being A Lawyer (Part I) | Teacher Tools and Tips | Scoop.it
What do lawyers wish non-lawyers understood about them, and why is it so hard to be a lawyer in the first place?
Sharrock's insight:

Knowledge workers have so many similar gripes with us educators. Lawyers have even more than expected.

I hope to blog about these similarities or to produce a similar list along the same lines, line by line, except there are some statements that don't apply to educators at all.

 

This statement remains true only for lawyers: “Lawyers are the one profession in which pessimists outperform optimists.” ~Ross Guberman

 

 

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The Essential Tools for Fixing Kitchen Mistakes

The Essential Tools for Fixing Kitchen Mistakes | Teacher Tools and Tips | Scoop.it
When all else fails, I like to turn to the food and philosophy of Mr. Shopsin, who taught me (and I quote!) “that not being so terrific -- that’s OK. Because most people who say they are terrific: Bill Clinton, Cardinal Egan. Anybody you want to talk about -- they’re not so terrific. Martha Stewart? Not so terrific either. There is nothing wrong with not being so terrific. It’s what the whole ball game is about, not being so terrific and accepting it.”  
Sharrock's insight:

This kind of advice can be stretched--extremely stretched, but stretched--for us in other professions. 

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The unhealthy modern Indian

The unhealthy modern Indian | Teacher Tools and Tips | Scoop.it
Sodas and snacks are taking Indians down a deadly road.
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Who Rules America: The Class-Domination Theory of Power

Who has predominant power in the United States? The short answer, from 1776 to the present, is: Those who have the money -- or more specifically, who own income-producing land and businesses -- have the power. George Washington was one of the biggest landowners of his day; presidents in the late 19th century were close to the railroad interests; for the Bush family, it was oil and other natural resources, agribusiness, and finance. In this day and age, this means that banks, corporations, agribusinesses, and big real estate developers, working separately on most policy issues, but in combination on important general issues -- such as taxes, opposition to labor unions, and trade agreements with other countries -- set the rules within which policy battles are waged.

While this conclusion may at first seem too simple or direct, leaving little room for elected officials or voters, the reasons behind it are complex. They involve an understanding of social classes, the role of experts, the two-party system, and the history of the country, especially Southern slavery. In terms of the big world-historical picture, and the Four Networks theory of power advocated on this site, large economic interests rule in America because there are no rival networks that grew up over a long and complex history:

There is no one big church, as in many countries in Europe
No big government, as it took to survive as a nation-state in Europe
No big military until after 1940 (which is not very long ago) to threaten to take over the government
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10 Things You Don't Know About Formative Assessment - Brilliant or Insane

10 Things You Don't Know About Formative Assessment - Brilliant or Insane | Teacher Tools and Tips | Scoop.it
Formative assessment is a verb, not a noun: ten things you don't know about formative assessment.
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