Teacher Tools and...
Follow
Find
2.3K views | +1 today
 
Scooped by Sharrock
onto Teacher Tools and Tips
Scoop.it!

Why You Should Get A Bachelor's Degree In Nursing | CAREEREALISM

Why You Should Get A Bachelor's Degree In Nursing | CAREEREALISM | Teacher Tools and Tips | Scoop.it
Those who want to become an RN should pursue a bachelor's degree in nursing. Here are some advantages to earning this undergraduate degree.
Sharrock's insight:

You might want to share this with your students, especially those who are undecided. 

more...
No comment yet.

From around the web

Teacher Tools and Tips
Tools, tips and practices to share with teachers
Curated by Sharrock
Your new post is loading...
Your new post is loading...
Rescooped by Sharrock from The 21st Century
Scoop.it!

Teacher Reviewed Educational Apps for 2012 - We Are Teachers

Teacher Reviewed Educational Apps for 2012 - We Are Teachers | Teacher Tools and Tips | Scoop.it
Reviews and best practices from teachers who have used apps.

Via Dr. Susan Bainbridge
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Sharrock from Tyrants Fear Poets
Scoop.it!

Poems Every Child Should Know by Mary E Burt Part 4/4 [AudioBooks]

“Poems Every Child Should Know by Mary E Burt [AudioBooks] Playlist : http://goo.gl/LlvDlk Facebook : http://goo.gl/xw7enB Twitter : http://goo.gl/ZzKmbd A ...”


Via Mark G Kirshner
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Sharrock
Scoop.it!

When Corporations Take The Lead On Social Change

When Corporations Take The Lead On Social Change | Teacher Tools and Tips | Scoop.it
Some big names in business pushed back this week against "religious freedom" laws in Indiana and Arkansas. In 1964, it was Coca-Cola pushing Atlanta's white elites to honor Martin Luther King Jr.
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Sharrock from Digital Media Literacy + Cyber Arts + Performance Centers Connected to Fiber Networks
Scoop.it!

Even when test scores go up, some cognitive abilities don’t | MIT News Office

Even when test scores go up, some cognitive abilities don’t | MIT News Office | Teacher Tools and Tips | Scoop.it

To evaluate school quality, states require students to take standardized tests; in many cases, passing those tests is necessary to receive a high-school diploma. These high-stakes tests have also been shown to predict students’ future educational attainment and adult employment and income.

Such tests are designed to measure the knowledge and skills that students have acquired in school — what psychologists call “crystallized intelligence.” However, schools whose students have the highest gains on test scores do not produce similar gains in “fluid intelligence” — the ability to analyze abstract problems and think logically — according to a new study from MIT neuroscientists working with education researchers at Harvard University and Brown University.

In a study of nearly 1,400 eighth-graders in the Boston public school system, the researchers found that some schools have successfully raised their students’ scores on the Massachusetts Comprehensive Assessment System (MCAS). However, those schools had almost no effect on students’ performance on tests of fluid intelligence skills, such as working memory capacity, speed of information processing, and ability to solve abstract problems.

 

Click headline to read more--


Via Chuck Sherwood, Senior Associate, TeleDimensions, Inc
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Sharrock from iPads in Education
Scoop.it!

Free Technology for Teachers: PicMonkey + Thinglink = Interactive Collages

Free Technology for Teachers: PicMonkey + Thinglink = Interactive Collages | Teacher Tools and Tips | Scoop.it
A couple of nights ago my friend Joe, a middle school social studies teacher, sent me a Facebook message about creating multimedia collages. My suggestion to Joe was to use PicMonkey and Thinglink. In the video below I demonstrate how to do that.

Via John Evans
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Sharrock from Tools for Teachers & Learners
Scoop.it!

Loops - The iPad animator

Loops - The iPad animator | Teacher Tools and Tips | Scoop.it

Loop lets you easily create short hand-drawn animations on your iPad and share them via email, Tumblr and in the Loop gallery.


Via Nik Peachey
more...
Nik Peachey's curator insight, March 22, 10:06 AM

This looks like a useful free tool for creating short hand drawn animations on the iPad. A great way to illustrate or get students to illustrate meaning and concepts.

GG's curator insight, March 24, 11:39 PM

This could be good!

Rescooped by Sharrock from Leadership, Innovation, and Creativity
Scoop.it!

Learning needs a context

Learning needs a context | Teacher Tools and Tips | Scoop.it
“ This is a follow up to a post I wrote, How Do We Learn? How Should We Learn? The purpose of these posts is to encourage educators to examine practices they take for granted, implement without deep reflection of their efficacy. This post discusses the instructional practice of asking students to memorize information. How often have students (ourselves included) been asked to memorize mass amounts of facts – historical dates, vocabulary words, science facts, get tested on them, just to forget almost all those memorized facts a week or two later? Given that is this learning experience is more common than not, why do educators insist on continuing this archaic and ineffective instructional practice?”
Via Edumorfosis, Suvi Salo, Ivon Prefontaine
more...
Ivon Prefontaine's curator insight, March 21, 10:09 PM

It does. Enough said.

 

@ivon_ehd1

Scooped by Sharrock
Scoop.it!

Statistics Outgrowing Other STEM Fields

Statistics Outgrowing Other STEM Fields | Teacher Tools and Tips | Scoop.it
A New Social Science? Statistics Outgrowing Other STEM Fields

 

Statistics—the science of learning from data—is the fastest-growing science, technology, engineering and math (STEM) undergraduate degree in the United States over the last four years, an analysis of federal government education data conducted by the American Statistical Association (ASA) revealed.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Sharrock
Scoop.it!

10 words we've forgotten how to pronounce

10 words we've forgotten how to pronounce | Teacher Tools and Tips | Scoop.it
Chances are you've been saying 'blackguard' wrong — to name but one example
Sharrock's insight:
I'm remembering all the nursery rhymes that didnt rhyme, Star Trek episodes, Moby Dick, and Peter Pan and every time the Chris Claremont Xmen dealt with Irish mutants. Ive been pronouncing so many words wrongly for more than 40 years!
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Sharrock from School Leadership, Leadership, in General, Tools and Resources, Advice and humor
Scoop.it!

Better Standardized Testing (Myths and Falsehoods) | Cognitive Rigor to the Core!

Better Standardized Testing (Myths and Falsehoods) | Cognitive Rigor to the Core! | Teacher Tools and Tips | Scoop.it
Argument: Testing doesn't assess everything a child needs to learn!

This argument is a form of the Nirvana fallacy, where an idea is rejected because it doesn't provide a perfect solution to a problem or fails to meet every single criterion for effectiveness. No matter how well a test is designed, it will never capture all of the factors needed for students to succeed. 
Sharrock's insight:

Walkup raises important points that points back to the need for others to evaluate our thinking and actions. We are human, so we can't be perfect. The most obvious of our imperfections is captured by the endless list of fallacies and biases. In the end, only (mostly) the most mentally ill will see herself as the bad guy in her life story. No matter what we do, we have rationales or rationalizations. Even when we're wrong, we can only mostly see our errors in retrospect. (To experience this, try editing your own writing then hand it over to someone else to edit.Then compare the editing suggestions.) 

 

On the other hand, we also need to trust and respect our evaluators. This is something that standardized testing--based on how they are constructed--can provide based on objectivity and sample sizes. And we all believe in testing. "When a calculus teacher assesses her students on Taylor series expansions, she knows fully well that her assessment will fail to capture many of the personal traits needed to be a successful mathematician. Yet, she still assigns the test."

 "Standardized testing is no different. Results of standardized testing are limited to uncovering gaps in basic concepts/skills acquisition. We should acknowledge as such."  

This is better than depending on the opinionated colleague down the hall who finds success certain ways that fits his personality, but doesn't fit well for anyone else. 

more...
Sharrock's curator insight, March 8, 7:17 PM

Walkup raises important points that points back to the need for others to evaluate our thinking and actions. We are human, so we can't be perfect. The most obvious of our imperfections is captured by the endless list of fallacies and biases. In the end, only (mostly) the most mentally ill will see herself as the bad guy in her life story. No matter what we do, we have rationales or rationalizations. Even when we're wrong, we can only mostly see our errors in retrospect. (To experience this, try editing your own writing then hand it over to someone else to edit.Then compare the editing suggestions.) 

 

On the other hand, we also need to trust and respect our evaluators. This is something that standardized testing--based on how they are constructed--can provide based on objectivity and sample sizes. And we all believe in testing. "When a calculus teacher assesses her students on Taylor series expansions, she knows fully well that her assessment will fail to capture many of the personal traits needed to be a successful mathematician. Yet, she still assigns the test."

 "Standardized testing is no different. Results of standardized testing are limited to uncovering gaps in basic concepts/skills acquisition. We should acknowledge as such."  

This is better than depending on the opinionated colleague down the hall who finds success certain ways that fits his personality, but doesn't fit well for anyone else. 

Scooped by Sharrock
Scoop.it!

The Crime Scene

The Crime Scene | Teacher Tools and Tips | Scoop.it
Maybe, after all, it doesn’t pay to be the world’s biggest jailer.
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Sharrock from visual data
Scoop.it!

Favorite Pew Research Center data visualizations from 2014

Favorite Pew Research Center data visualizations from 2014 | Teacher Tools and Tips | Scoop.it

"The heart of our work at the Pew Research Center is data. And data visualizations that tell clear stories about our research — whether it be about American politics or our changing demographics — are just as important as the words we write in a report. So, what makes a successful data visual? We think it should present information clearly and concisely, engage the reader and allow them to explore that information.

This year, the design staff looked back through our 2014 archive, and these graphics stood out as almost universal favorites. These visualizations presented a particular challenge and, for each of them, we talk about the approach we took in presenting the data."


Via Lauren Moss
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Sharrock from Tyrants Fear Poets
Scoop.it!

Library of Congress Launches New Online Poetry Archive, Featuring 75 Years of Classic Poetry Readings

Library of Congress Launches New Online Poetry Archive, Featuring 75 Years of Classic Poetry Readings | Teacher Tools and Tips | Scoop.it

“Image by Fred Palumbo, made available by the Library of Congress. Put THIS in your pocket. The Library of Congress is celebrating National Poetry Month by launching its new Archive of Recorded Poetry and Literature.”


Via Mark G Kirshner
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Sharrock from The Psychogenyx News Feed
Scoop.it!

Study provides new insight into what occurs in the brain during the learning process - PsyPost

Study provides new insight into what occurs in the brain during the learning process - PsyPost | Teacher Tools and Tips | Scoop.it
Why are some people able to master a new skill quickly while others require extra time or practice? That was the question posed by UC Santa Barbara's Scott ...

Via Luis Valdes
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Sharrock from iPads in Education
Scoop.it!

Free Technology for Teachers: Convert PDFs to Google Docs to Differentiate Instructional Materials

Free Technology for Teachers: Convert PDFs to Google Docs to Differentiate Instructional Materials | Teacher Tools and Tips | Scoop.it
Recently, we discovered a feature of Google Drive that has changed how we prepare and access materials and resources for our students. As we attempt to make all curricula digital and thus make it available to all students, the idea of using PDFs was always a problem. PDFs are just not editable in most situations, and this was an issue when it came to modifying and differentiating documents. Adobe Acrobat was our “go to” application for this type of conversion, but it was costly and often hard to come by in an educational setting. Note: We still use Adobe Acrobat for complex projects or documents that do not convert well in Google Drive. With the most recent update to Google Drive, OCR (Optical Character Recognition) capabilities are better and easier than ever.

Via John Evans
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Sharrock from Critical and Creative Thinking for active learning
Scoop.it!

Critical thinking includes Reflection: 40 questions to reflect on your learning


Via Maree Whiteley
more...
Maree Whiteley's curator insight, November 13, 2014 2:48 AM

Critical thinking includes reflectiNG on your learning...here are 40 questions via Edutopia

Rescooped by Sharrock from Eclectic Technology
Scoop.it!

10 Smart Study Tactics That Support How The Brain Actually Works

10 Smart Study Tactics That Support How The Brain Actually Works | Teacher Tools and Tips | Scoop.it
Here's the problem with what I'm about to tell you: these tactics may may be news to you, but in psychology circles most of them have been around for dec

Via Beth Dichter
more...
Beth Dichter's curator insight, March 22, 11:25 AM

Do our learners know how to study? Perhaps a better question is do we understand the research that shows successful ways to study have been known for decades, but our current learning environment is not necessarily conducive to these learning habits. T

This post shares ten strategies for studying, as well as providing links to additional resources. It ends with a short discussion on why we may not be seeing these strategies used.
Four strategies are listed below. Click through to the post for additional information.

* Study to learn, not to "know." Knowing means we may know an answer, but not truly understand what is being discussed.

* Imagine you'll be teaching someone else. Research is showing that the expectation that you will need to teach material to others tends to use more effective learning strategies.

* Separate process from progress. Does learning end? Do we make progress but continue in the process?

* Space out your study sessions over time. Brain research shows that cramming is not effective.

There are many insights in this post that you may want to share with your students and colleagues.

Nancy Jones's curator insight, March 23, 1:36 PM

Some good reminders and a great question. Who teaches the kids how to make the optimum use of this information?

Nancy Jones's curator insight, March 23, 1:37 PM

Who is teaching this to our students?  I think that is the question. some great tips and throughtful explanations as well.

Rescooped by Sharrock from Knowmads, Infocology of the future
Scoop.it!

Marshall McLuhan on the Mobile Phone |Peter Benson sees a prophet’s message come to fulfilment through net and cell. Philosophy Now

Marshall McLuhan on the Mobile Phone |Peter Benson sees a prophet’s message come to fulfilment through net and cell. Philosophy Now | Teacher Tools and Tips | Scoop.it

Marshall McLuhan never owned a mobile phone. He died in 1980, before such gadgets became widely available. Yet the theories he developed about the effect of communications media on the human psyche can be applied to recent technologies which he could have known nothing about. In fact, in the age of the Internet and the mobile phone, many people are beginning to read McLuhan with renewed interest.

At the time of his death, McLuhan’s reputation was probably at its lowest ebb. The media research centre he founded at Toronto University had been closed down. The period of his popular fame – when he had appeared on TV, given numerous public lectures, and even made a cameo appearance (as himself) in Woody Allen’s film Annie Hall – all this was in the past. Within the academic world there was wide-spread doubt about his theories. Today, however, interest is reviving. His 1964 book Understanding Media has been reprinted by Routledge Classics every year since 2001 (three times in 2008). People are reading McLuhan, and it is not too difficult to understand why.


Via Wildcat2030
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Sharrock from iGeneration - 21st Century Education
Scoop.it!

Child Development 101: 8 Key Things to Know About How Kids Learn

Child Development 101: 8 Key Things to Know About How Kids Learn | Teacher Tools and Tips | Scoop.it
Kids develop at different paces, but all kids’ brains develop neural pathways at each stage of development. Here are key things to know about child development.

Via Tom D'Amico (@TDOttawa)
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Sharrock
Scoop.it!

Tea Tuesdays: The Scottish Spy Who Stole China's Tea Empire

Tea Tuesdays: The Scottish Spy Who Stole China's Tea Empire | Teacher Tools and Tips | Scoop.it
In the mid-1800s, Britain was a global superpower with a big weakness for tea, all of which came from China. But a botanist with a talent for espionage helped Britain swipe the secrets of tea.
Sharrock's insight:
"The task required a plant hunter, a gardener, a thief, a spy. The man Britain needed was Robert Fortune," Rose writes. Fortune was the agent sent to sneak out of China the plants and secrets of tea production. (excerpt) http ://www.npr.org/blogs/thesalt/2015/03/10/392116370/tea-tuesdays-the-scottish-spy-who-stole-chinas-tea-empire?utm_source=facebook.com&utm_medium=social&utm_campaign=npr&utm_term=nprnews&utm_content=20150310
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Sharrock from Geography Education
Scoop.it!

Pun-Fueled Food Maps

Pun-Fueled Food Maps | Teacher Tools and Tips | Scoop.it
U.S. Map + Haha + Yum = Foodnited States of America

Via Seth Dixon
Sharrock's insight:

This is fun. Kids need fun. Don't be fooled by the loudest kids complaining about how painful the puns may be. They are enjoying it the most and will be the ones talking about these examples most often and for longer.

more...
Julie Cidell's curator insight, March 9, 10:34 AM

Puns and maps and food all in one place; what's not to love?

zane alan berger's curator insight, March 24, 3:58 PM

This article relating to our agricultural unit boasts a fun way to view all 50 states by showing foods in the shape of a state along with a playful pun.

Paul Farias's curator insight, April 9, 1:09 PM

I think the one that got me the best, was Arrozona thats a good one!

Scooped by Sharrock
Scoop.it!

Grace Hopper, 'The Queen Of Code,' Would Have Hated That Title

Grace Hopper, 'The Queen Of Code,' Would Have Hated That Title | Teacher Tools and Tips | Scoop.it
Women were responsible for programming early computers, and Hopper led the charge. Later in her career, Hopper helped create a common language that computers could understand. It was called common business oriented language, or COBOL — a programming language still used today.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Sharrock
Scoop.it!

New Naperville curriculum gets back to 'ooh, ahh of science' - Chicago Daily Herald

New Naperville curriculum gets back to 'ooh, ahh of science' - Chicago Daily Herald | Teacher Tools and Tips | Scoop.it
Science teachers at Naperville Central and Naperville North high schools are preparing to handle roughly double the number of chemistry students next year as a new science curriculum shifts the class from sophomore to freshman year.
more...
No comment yet.