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20+ Tools to Create Your Own Infographics

20+ Tools to Create Your Own Infographics | Teacher Tools and Tips | Scoop.it

A picture is worth a thousand words – based on this, infographics would carry hundreds of thousands of words, yet if you let a reader choose between a full-length 1000-word article and an infographic that needs a few scroll-downs, they’d probably prefer absorbing information straight from the infographic. What’s not to like? Colored charts and illustrations deliver connections better than tables and figures and as users spend time looking back and forth the full infographic, they stay on the site longer. Plus, readers who like what they see are more likely to share visual guides more than articles. While not everyone can make infographics from scratch, there are tools available on the Web that will help you create your very own infographics. In this article, we’re listing more than 20 such options to help you get your messages across to your readers, visually.


Via Tolokonnikoff - Seratoo , michel verstrepen
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Dolly Bhasin 's curator insight, January 26, 2013 8:01 PM

A gr8 collection of tools for creating INFOGRAPHICS.

Teacher Tools and Tips
Tools, tips and practices to share with teachers
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Teacher Reviewed Educational Apps for 2012 - We Are Teachers

Teacher Reviewed Educational Apps for 2012 - We Are Teachers | Teacher Tools and Tips | Scoop.it
Reviews and best practices from teachers who have used apps.

Via Susan Bainbridge
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Video Playlist: 9 Strategies for Effective Classroom Management

Video Playlist: 9 Strategies for Effective Classroom Management | Teacher Tools and Tips | Scoop.it
This week, our playlist highlights a mix of techniques for fostering classroom management and productive classroom culture.

Via Mary Perfitt-Nelson
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Mary Perfitt-Nelson's curator insight, January 25, 9:06 AM

A bevy of resources on effective classroom organiation!

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Q: How to Connect Critical Thinking, Research, and Information Literacy?

Q: How to Connect Critical Thinking, Research, and Information Literacy? | Teacher Tools and Tips | Scoop.it

The value of what might be called “fan literacies” to the teaching of skills and concepts related to a range of curricular content, including (so far) writing fiction, the Hero’s Journey, and digital literacy/netiquette.


Via Karen Bonanno, Frank Carbullido
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Paula Correia's curator insight, April 29, 2013 12:19 PM

Como relacionar Pensamento Crítico, Pesquisa e Literacia da Informação?

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Why Your Teaching Style Might Be A Bad Match For Your Students

Why Your Teaching Style Might Be A Bad Match For Your Students | Teacher Tools and Tips | Scoop.it
Why Your Teaching Style Might Be A Bad Match For Your Students
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Ivon Prefontaine's curator insight, April 21, 5:36 PM

Some students need more help than others. It does not mean they will accept it readily, but teaching is active and not passive. It is relational and situational so this chart can be helpful in viewing students and their needs, but take care we do not treat them as givens.

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What Teachers Want To Hear Students Say

What Teachers Want To Hear Students Say | Teacher Tools and Tips | Scoop.it
What Teachers Want To Hear Students Say
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Supporting Student Resilience in the Classroom

Supporting Student Resilience in the Classroom | Teacher Tools and Tips | Scoop.it
Watching a classroom of students working is fascinating. There are students who are engaged, who focus on the task and forge ahead. They get the job done on time, every time. There are other students
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Types of Problem Solving Tasks » Mathematics for Teaching

Types of Problem Solving Tasks » Mathematics for Teaching | Teacher Tools and Tips | Scoop.it
This post describes different types of problem solving tasks we normally use in teaching mathematics.
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Primary Source Sets | Teacher Resources - Library of Congress

Primary Source Sets | Teacher Resources - Library of Congress | Teacher Tools and Tips | Scoop.it
Sets of primary sources on baseball, Jamestown, Jim Crow laws, the Civil War, immigration, Spanish exploration, and the Dust Bowl from the Library of Congress including photos, maps, manuscripts, audio files, films, sheet music, and cartoons.

Via Mary Clark
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Mary Clark's curator insight, April 11, 12:49 PM

So many great primary source sets here!  I already saw 5 that my 8th grade ELA and history teachers could use.  

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The Future of Video Is About Learning How To Tell Great Emotional Stories

"...interviews with people from Vimeo, Adobe, Blackmagic design, Motionographer, Cinema 4D, Sehsucht, Mashable, Digital Bolex and many more."


Via Robin Good
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Robin Good's curator insight, April 15, 3:52 AM



In this SxSW set of video interviews captured by Wipster (a collaborative video review and approval service) with some of the "experts" in the online video publishing field, you can hear most of what you already know and expect from the future of video: 4K, real-time editing, effects, 3D, small screens and more. 

What instead emerges as the real challenge though, is to realize that no matter what kind of tools and services you use, the difficult part is to have a good story and to learn how to tell it on video.


Tools are great and easy indeed, but they don't make anyone a capable storyteller instantly. This is what we really need to work on.


No need to view all 12+ minutes of the video. Just check the first and the last interview in this clip and you will get the real meat.  



Insightful. Informative. 7/10

Original video:  http://vimeo.com/91457084 





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The One Skill You Need to Excel in Instructional Design

The One Skill You Need to Excel in Instructional Design | Teacher Tools and Tips | Scoop.it
Instructional design is a multi-faceted discipline, and – let’s face it – a lot is asked of instructional designers (IDs). We need to have adult learning theory and learning models at our fingertips, be data detectives, sharp interviewers, and writers who can weave a story, not to mention detail-oriented, process-oriented, organized pros. Yet the one essential skill for IDs in corporate training and Learning and Development (L&D) is rarely taught in schools.  

Via Ana Cristina Pratas
Sharrock's insight:

I never thought of it this way. Curriculum as weaving a story.

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miracletrain 夢想驛站's curator insight, April 14, 7:26 PM
The Most Important Aspect of the Instructional Design and Development Process - CONNECTION TO BUSINESS GOALS.
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26 Ways To Facilitate Learning

26 Ways To Facilitate Learning | Teacher Tools and Tips | Scoop.it

“There are many different instructional design techniques available today, and as such it is can be difficult to determine which one is best for the content you are presenting.”


Via Dean J. Fusto, Tim Viands, Brad Merrick
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Brad Merrick's curator insight, April 15, 12:43 AM
Liking the ideas here, particularly the ongoing reference to the individual capacities of the learner, ie thinking, understanding, questioning... Well worth the read and some great key points to use in the classroom setting.
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The Adult Learning Theory – Andragogy – Infogra...

The Adult Learning Theory – Andragogy – Infogra... | Teacher Tools and Tips | Scoop.it
The Adult Learning Theory - Andragogy - Infographic explores Malcolm Knowles’ Adult Learning Theory, the Assumptions of Adult Learners and Andragogy Principles.
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Visible Thinking Routines: Extend & Deepen Students Understanding

Visible Thinking Routines: Extend & Deepen Students Understanding | Teacher Tools and Tips | Scoop.it
Beth Dichter's insight:

Harvard University has a website on visual thinking that is designed for educators and students. Silvia Tolasano, the author of Langwitches Blog, has taken a number of their routines and created visualizations that would be useful for students, visualizations that you might post on your walls or provide copies of for students to put in their binders. 
There is one twist to a number of these  visualizations...they are specific for blogging. The image above includes two of the visualizations. In the post you will find an additional five routines. You will also find an infographic of all the routines within the post available as an infographic

To go directly to the site at Harvard use this link: http://www.old-pz.gse.harvard.edu/vt/VisibleThinking_html_files/VisibleThinking1.html/. And if you are wondering why you might use visible thinking routines consider this statement from the website on visual thinking (at Harvard): 

"Visible Thinking has a double goal: on the one hand, to cultivate students' thinking skills and dispositions, and, on the other, to deepen content learning."


Via Beth Dichter
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Cindy Riley Klages's curator insight, April 9, 3:38 AM

These routines have classroom merit, too, as we're trying to get students to think.

Julienne Feeney's curator insight, April 9, 4:21 PM

Complements MYP principles and Learner Profiles beautifully...

Kate JohnsonMcGregor's curator insight, April 12, 10:26 AM

This has so much relevance when teaching students questioning and critical thinking skills. Great tool for developing Inquiry based learning strategies. Also, I love an infographic!

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Data Discussion

Data Discussion | Teacher Tools and Tips | Scoop.it

How can teachers capitalize on data about student learning that are generated in their classrooms every day? How can this information best be collected and used to increase student learning? Making data part of instructional planning can be challenging, especially if teachers are not used to thinking about assessment and data as a regular part of the process.

Effective feedback  is a great way for teachers to use collected data in order to improve student learning.

Results from almost any assessment can be of great benefit to students, provided they are used to make instructional adjustments. And — the shorter the amount of time between assessment and adjustment — the more powerful its effect on learning. Just like a diet plan that sits on your desk…until you actually pick it up and DO something with it, it isn’t going to affect much!

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The history of philosophy, in superhero comics

The history of philosophy, in superhero comics | Teacher Tools and Tips | Scoop.it

Roof-jumping with Kierkegaard, archaeological adventures with Foucault, wayfinding in the woods with William James, and more.


Via Luca Baptista
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Teaching Critical Thinking Skills

More critical thinking:http://t.co/WW6diHyNpH

Via Frank Carbullido
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Why Your Teaching Style Might Be A Bad Match For Your Students

Why Your Teaching Style Might Be A Bad Match For Your Students | Teacher Tools and Tips | Scoop.it
Why Your Teaching Style Might Be A Bad Match For Your Students
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How to Help Your Child Develop Writing Skills

How to Help Your Child Develop Writing Skills | Teacher Tools and Tips | Scoop.it
This article explains how to help your student(s) or child develop writing skills through a research based writing strategy called “Guided Writing.”
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24 Charts Of Leadership Styles Around The World

24 Charts Of Leadership Styles Around The World | Teacher Tools and Tips | Scoop.it
British linguist Richard Lewis charts everything from structured individualism in the U.S. to ringi-sho consensus in Japan.
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How Design Thinking Enables Creative Problem Solving - Innovation 360

How Design Thinking Enables Creative Problem Solving - Innovation 360 | Teacher Tools and Tips | Scoop.it
Design thinking is a user-centered approach for creative problem solving that is marked by building empathy, ideating solutions, and rapid prototyping.

Via Francine Pickering
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Francine Pickering's curator insight, April 11, 9:22 AM
Design thinking begins with empathy – developing a deep understanding of a user...
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15 top special education blogs

eClassroom News

Via Dawn Rife
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Evidence? Read like a detective, write like an investigative reporter

Evidence? Read like a detective, write like an investigative reporter | Teacher Tools and Tips | Scoop.it

"David Liben, who was involved in the creation of the Common Core and is now Senior Content Specialist at Student Achievement Partners, provides this simple explanation of evidence under the new standards: “It means asking children two questions:

‘What is your evidence?''How did you figure that out?’

 

The point is to ask students to answer not just based on their thoughts or opinions, but on evidence in the text.”


Via Mel Riddile
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Engage Students (and Entertain Them a Little, too!)

By Michael F. Opitz, Michael P. Ford “I am not here to entertain students. I am here to teach them to learn specific content and skills,” commented a teacher in a workshop we were conducting. Imagine her surprise when we agreed with her! In our research on motivation and engagement, which led to creating our joyful learning framework, we discovered that the terms engagement and entertainment are often used synonymously when they are anything but alike. In this brief blog post, we point out the differences and provide some student engagement suggestions. We are drawing these thoughts from our most recent work, Engaging Minds in the Classroom: The Surprising Power of Joy. What is Engagement? Wlodkowski and Ginsberg (1995) defined engagement as the visible outcome of motivation, the natural capacity to direct energy in the pursuit of a goal. It usually happens when learners can sense success is within their reach, they value the outcome of the learning experience, and they feel safe in the classroom setting (Brophy, 2008). Attentive, committed, persistent, and meaning seekers are four characteristics of engaged learners (Schlecty, 2011). During a whole group lesson, a teacher would look for attentive students who are focused on completing a given task and persist if the task becomes difficult because they value what they are doing and derive meaning from it. One sure way to double-check these observations is to talk with students as they complete their work and listen to what they have to say about it. Engaged students might make comments such as “I am having trouble understanding this section but I really want to know about how gravity works. I think I need to look at more of the diagrams to help me understand.” So What Is Entertainment? The difference between entertainment and engagement is clear if we just think about the two words. We know that entertaining students is fairly easy (remember the Friday afternoon video?). As Katz and Chard (2000) remind us, engagement involves getting students interested in the word around them. If students become interested in their world, they will always be able to find something that interests them in their lives. Engagement draws us into our daily lives, whereas entertainment does the opposite; we seek it out to distract us from our daily lives. It diverts us from attending to important matters. In the end, entertainment is fairly fleeting and short-lived. So why make the distinction between these two terms? As educators, our job is to engage students rather than entertain them. We get them engaged by providing tasks that enable them to be attentive, committed, and persistent learners who strive to understand what they are learning, which leads to sustainable and longer-lasting pleasure than when they are entertained. Engaged students and teachers derive joy and pleasure from what they do; they do not need to be entertained (Schlecty, 2011). So What Does This Mean For Educators? While we emphasize the importance of engagement over entertainment, we also recognize that a bit of entertainment can lead students to  engagement. In these instances, we want to use entertainment. For example, we might decide to dress up as a historical figure to engage students in learning about that figure. Or we might use a humorous story to entice students to learn content. We fully recognize that having fun allows students to build social relationships. Rather than seeing engagement and entertainment as an “either/or” issue, we suggest using both in purposeful ways to gain a full understanding of  how engagement and entertainment contribute to the larger picture. Entertainment becomes a means rather than the end. Using props, humor, and other activities that students find fun in purposeful and meaningful ways can lead to engaged students. Engaged students are more joyful in their learning pursuits. As a result, their learning is learning with staying power. In essence, joy leads students to learning rather than away from it. References Brophy, J. (2008). Developing students’ appreciation for what is taught in school. Educational Psychologist, 43, 132–141. Katz, L. G., & Chard, S. C. (2000). Engaging children’s minds: The project approach (2nd ed.). Stamford, CT: Ablex. Opitz, M., and Ford, M. (2014). Engaging minds in the classroom: The surprising power of joy. Alexandria, VA: ASCD. Schlecty, P. C. (2011). Engaging students: The next level of working on the work. San Francisco, CA: Jossey-Bass. Wlodkowski, R. J., & Ginsberg, M. B. (1995). Diversity and motivation: Culturally responsive teaching. San Francisco, CA: Jossey-Bass.

Via Grant Montgomery
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What Gets in the Way of Listening

What Gets in the Way of Listening | Teacher Tools and Tips | Scoop.it

As your role grows in scale and influence, so too must your ability to listen. But listening is one of the toughest skills to master — and requires uncovering deeper barriers within oneself.

Sharrock's insight:

Think about this for training of new teachers and administrators. Teachers are learning leaders so may find these tips particularly helpful.

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Getting the Mix Right Again: An Updated and Theoretical Rationale for Interaction - T.Anderson

Getting the Mix Right Again: An Updated and Theoretical Rationale for Interaction - T.Anderson | Teacher Tools and Tips | Scoop.it
Getting the Mix Right Again: An Updated and Theoretical Rationale for Interaction

Via Ana Cristina Pratas
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Helping Students Become Better Thinkers | Inquire Within

Helping Students Become Better Thinkers | Inquire Within | Teacher Tools and Tips | Scoop.it

“ In a classroom with a culture of visible thinking, students have opportunities to articulate their ideas and to think things through for themselves, and their awareness of thinking strategies increases.”


Via Kim Muncie, Brad Merrick
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Brad Merrick's curator insight, April 4, 3:52 AM
Valuable overview of the benefits and processes associated with the development of thinking skills in the classroom.