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Teacher Tools and Tips
Tools, tips and practices to share with teachers
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Don Peek - Peek's Perspective on Grants: Three Big Hurdles to Writing a Winning Grant Proposal

Over the years I've talked to hundreds of people about writing grants. As I think back over those conversations, most of them seem to center on three big hurdles that grant writers face. Tackle those three hurdles and you'll be getting grant money before you know it.
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Visible Thinking Routines: Extend & Deepen Students Understanding

Visible Thinking Routines: Extend & Deepen Students Understanding | Teacher Tools and Tips | Scoop.it
Beth Dichter's insight:

Harvard University has a website on visual thinking that is designed for educators and students. Silvia Tolasano, the author of Langwitches Blog, has taken a number of their routines and created visualizations that would be useful for students, visualizations that you might post on your walls or provide copies of for students to put in their binders. 
There is one twist to a number of these  visualizations...they are specific for blogging. The image above includes two of the visualizations. In the post you will find an additional five routines. You will also find an infographic of all the routines within the post available as an infographic

To go directly to the site at Harvard use this link: http://www.old-pz.gse.harvard.edu/vt/VisibleThinking_html_files/VisibleThinking1.html/. And if you are wondering why you might use visible thinking routines consider this statement from the website on visual thinking (at Harvard): 

"Visible Thinking has a double goal: on the one hand, to cultivate students' thinking skills and dispositions, and, on the other, to deepen content learning."


Via Beth Dichter
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Cindy Riley Klages's curator insight, April 9, 6:38 AM

These routines have classroom merit, too, as we're trying to get students to think.

Julienne Feeney's curator insight, April 9, 7:21 PM

Complements MYP principles and Learner Profiles beautifully...

Kate JohnsonMcGregor's curator insight, April 12, 1:26 PM

This has so much relevance when teaching students questioning and critical thinking skills. Great tool for developing Inquiry based learning strategies. Also, I love an infographic!

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iPad Apps for Dyslexia/Reading Writing Support

iPad Apps for Dyslexia/Reading Writing Support | Teacher Tools and Tips | Scoop.it
Staff at CALL Scotland have produced a helpful Wheel of Apps guide for iPad that may be useful for students with dyslexia or who just need some additional support with reading and/or writing diffic...

Via Kathleen McClaskey
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Ra's curator insight, March 31, 4:14 PM

Looking from a SENCO perspective as a resource that can be used by teachers to get them thinking about using apps for those students with high learning needs. Student voice and autonomy could be increased by having them explore the apps indicated as being useful and give feedback on how and why they think the app would fit with their learning needs. 

Pippa Davies @PippaDavies 's curator insight, April 1, 12:40 PM

iPad Apps for students with Dyslexia.

Heidi Hutchison's curator insight, April 27, 7:44 AM

Great resources!

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6 Good Educational Web Tools to Teach Writing Through Comics ~ Educational Technology and Mobile Learning

6 Good Educational Web Tools to Teach Writing Through Comics ~ Educational Technology and Mobile Learning | Teacher Tools and Tips | Scoop.it

Via Bhushan THAPLIYAL, Juergen Wagner, RitaZ, Rui Guimarães Lima, michel verstrepen
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sarah's curator insight, March 18, 1:37 PM

Utiles pour encourager les élèves à écrire et créer des histoires.

Alfredo Corell's curator insight, March 23, 12:49 PM

Using comic strips is one powerful way to get students excited and motivated about the writing act. Students love to interact with visuals and tools such as the ones listed below will empower them to do just that. Using these comic strip generators , students will get  to engage in conversations using cartoonic characters and build stories and share their works with each other.

Ness Crouch's curator insight, March 28, 7:45 PM

I like these ideas! Teaching comic strip writing can be lots of fun!

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How to Train Your Mind to Think Critically and Form Your Own Opinions

How to Train Your Mind to Think Critically and Form Your Own Opinions | Teacher Tools and Tips | Scoop.it
"Critical Thinking" may sound like an obnoxious buzzword from liberal arts schools, but it's actually a useful skill. Critical thinking just means absorbing important information and using that to form a decision or opinion of your own--rather than just spouting off what you hear others say. This doesn't always come naturally to us, but luckily, it's something you can train yourself to do better.
Sharrock's insight:

share with students, read it for yourself, share with friends and relatives. Writing instruction is a good place to review this. 

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The 45 Most Powerful Photos Of 2013

The 45 Most Powerful Photos Of 2013 | Teacher Tools and Tips | Scoop.it
Warning: This post will make you feel emotions.
Sharrock's insight:

Writing prompts don't need to be bland/boring. These photos tell stories and are packed with emotions. Students can explore these stories as disconnected from the news story or through the somewhat current event. Students can also develop descriptive language to describe the images they see. 

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TALC library's curator insight, December 10, 2013 9:47 PM

Some very good material for end of year discussion.

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Training Teachers to Teach Critical Thinking

Training Teachers to Teach Critical Thinking | Teacher Tools and Tips | Scoop.it
KIPP King Collegiate High School principal Jason Singer trains his teachers to lead Socratic discussions (above); Katie Kirkpatrick (right), dean of instruction, developed a step-by-step framework --
Sharrock's insight:

Is it possible to both teach students critical thinking and prepare them for the state tests?

You can make sure students are ready for the state tests as well as infuse critical thinking into the curriculum. Most of those tests are very knowledge-based; they don't require kids to do much critical thinking. So you can ramp up the content by having the kids analyze it and evaluate it. When they do that, the learning sticks.

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Summary Writing Hints and Tips That Get Great Results

Summary Writing Hints and Tips That Get Great Results | Teacher Tools and Tips | Scoop.it
The summary may not be as glamorous as the title or as fulfilling as the article itself, but it's still important to your article's overall success.The summary is your hook to get readers to click on your article.

Via Nader Ale Ebrahim
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A Non-Freaked Out Approach to Common Core Writing | Teaching the Core

A Non-Freaked Out Approach to Common Core Writing | Teaching the Core | Teacher Tools and Tips | Scoop.it
How do we incorporate simple yet powerful writing activities that will not only prepare our students for college/career, but also help with content acquisition?

Via Beth Panitz, Ed.D.
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Readwritelearnwell's curator insight, August 17, 2013 5:17 PM

This applies to all students and discusses research that shows the importance of regular and continued writing.

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Q: How to Connect Critical Thinking, Research, and Information Literacy?

Q: How to Connect Critical Thinking, Research, and Information Literacy? | Teacher Tools and Tips | Scoop.it

The value of what might be called “fan literacies” to the teaching of skills and concepts related to a range of curricular content, including (so far) writing fiction, the Hero’s Journey, and digital literacy/netiquette.


Via Karen Bonanno, Frank Carbullido
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Paula Correia's curator insight, April 29, 2013 3:19 PM

Como relacionar Pensamento Crítico, Pesquisa e Literacia da Informação?

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Evidence? Read like a detective, write like an investigative reporter

Evidence? Read like a detective, write like an investigative reporter | Teacher Tools and Tips | Scoop.it

"David Liben, who was involved in the creation of the Common Core and is now Senior Content Specialist at Student Achievement Partners, provides this simple explanation of evidence under the new standards: “It means asking children two questions:

‘What is your evidence?''How did you figure that out?’

 

The point is to ask students to answer not just based on their thoughts or opinions, but on evidence in the text.”


Via Mel Riddile
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A Great Poster on The 6 Questions Critical Thin...

A Great Poster on The 6 Questions Critical Thin... | Teacher Tools and Tips | Scoop.it

A Great Poster on The 6 Questions Critical Thinker Asks ~ Educational Technology and Mobile Learning on Technology Resources for K-12 Education curated by Anna Hu (A Great Poster on The 6 Questions Critical Thinker Asks ~ Educational Technology and...


Via Yavuz Samur, Aaron Mattingly, Brad Merrick
Sharrock's insight:

useful to post or share for student notebooks. Critical thinking posters like these are also useful for research, writing. 

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Brad Merrick's curator insight, April 7, 8:37 AM
Wondering what types of questions motivate students to think deeply?
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Graphic Organizers for Writing

Graphic Organizers for Writing | Teacher Tools and Tips | Scoop.it
A selection of graphic organizers for writing. The organizers are in PDF format, ready to print and use.

Via Ana Cristina Pratas, juandoming, Lynnette Van Dyke
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Lou Salza's curator insight, March 6, 3:44 PM

Awesome site! robust tools! These graphic outlines provide  practice in two important skills for students with language or organizational challenges. First the organizers provide an external structured process and product for students with a need to break complex composition and communication tasks down into smaller steps. Second--as students use these outlines, they become 'internalized' --a cognitive tool equipping them with a ready made schema that increases comprehension of what they hear and read. --Lou

Judith Morais's curator insight, April 7, 7:23 AM

A range of prompts, templates etc to encourage and develop writing skills.

Ness Crouch's curator insight, April 20, 6:28 PM

Some useful pages here!

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The Topic Sentence Paragraph

In studying the etymology of the word paragraph , we find that it origin- ated in Greece. The term paragraphos meant a mark in the margin of a manuscript to set off part of a text. (Para = "beside"; graph = "mark"). As scholars have pointed out, since these early writers didn't indent the way we do today, or actually write in paragraphs as we know them, they used these marks in the margins to draw the reader's eyes to certain points. The contemporary use of paragraphs is very closely related to this practice.

 

There are two (2) kinds of paragraphs: the Topic Sentence Paragraph and the Function Paragraph. As pointed out by Neeld (1980), the "Topic Sentence Paragraph takes one main idea and develops it. The topic sentence (sometimes stated, sometimes implied) tells the readers what you are about to discuss, focuses the reader's mind on that particular thing, and then provides enough information to prove or explain or illustrate or otherwise develop that main idea." The author of Writing/2nd Edition, Dr. Neeld adds that "thus it is possible to break a Topic Sentence Paragraph down into two parts: the topic sentence itself (the main idea, either stated or implied) and the additional sentences (directly related to the topic sentence and developing it)."

 

 

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68 Apps for Students with Learning Disabilities

68 Apps for Students with Learning Disabilities | Teacher Tools and Tips | Scoop.it
68 Apps for students with learning disabilities -- and some software too! From our presentation at the LDAQ "Toolbox for Success" parent conference.

Via Kathleen McClaskey
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Kathleen McClaskey's curator insight, December 23, 2013 5:55 PM

This inclusive list of apps from inov8 Educational Consulting includes apps that target areas of need for learners in elementary school, high school and college. These apps are broken out into 7 categories:

 

> Reading and writing support and remediation

> Language remediation

> Productivity

> Alternative literacy formats

> Numeracy

> Fine motor skills

> Executive functioning

Pippa Davies @PippaDavies 's curator insight, December 26, 2013 7:12 PM

Some excellent choices in apps for learning disabilities.

Pauline Farrell's curator insight, February 2, 2:34 AM

and fin ally - to meet the needs of my learner demographic...

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MAKE BELIEFS COMIX! Online Educational Comic Generator for Kids of All Ages

Getting your kids into comic strips is easy. Just pick up a newspaper or visit a comic strip website likegocomics.com. Then, you can extend the educational value by helping them create a strip of their own. Some kids need only a blank piece of paper and pencil to churn out box after box. For those who need a prompt, you can enjoy the fun of creating one together. You’ll be surprised how easy it is. Try these ideas:

Draw a row of story boxes or print one from the Internet— try printablepaper.net. A few large boxes is best at first. Your child can work up to a grid when s»he’s ready for a longer sequence.Brainstorm with your young cartoonist. Will the characters be humans or animals? What emotions might they display—happiness, sadness, anger? Where does the story take place?Think about real-life situations to depict, such as a joke Dad told yesterday or a wacky thing that happened on the way to school. Move on to fantasy if your child wishes.You can either draw by hand or use a free online comic strip generator (like my site,makebeliefscomix.com). http://www.scholastic.com/parents/resources/article/parent-child/how-comic-strips-help-kids-learn-to-read-and-learn?utm_source=buffer&utm_campaign=Buffer&utm_content=bufferb0b31&utm_medium=linkedin#!

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Learning to Learn: fighting cognitive biases | Scoop.it Blog

Learning to Learn: fighting cognitive biases | Scoop.it Blog | Teacher Tools and Tips | Scoop.it

In a world with more information than ever, figuring out how to use the brain to its fullest potential, as well as filling it with as much knowledge as possible, is the main focus of a vast amount of people in this world.

 

I’ve made it clear on many occasions that I believe in the importance of being a perpetual learner. One of the key activities associated with learning is exploring and understanding the way the human brain functions, and using the results of this to properly hack the critical thinking process. For example, did you know that something called a cognitive bias exists? This term refers to the tendency to think in certain ways.

 

Cognitive biases range from the bandwagon effect – when truths are accepted because a large amount of people also accept them – to the confirmation bias – when people believe information that confirms what they think or believe in. According to those who study psychology and behavioral economics, hundreds of cognitive biases exist. It’s necessary to educate ourselves on these biases so that we can overcome them and make sure we’re thinking as clearly and critically as possible when it comes to decision making and information processing.

 

Critical thinking is an increasingly important skill that has been overlooked by many as information becomes more accessible and superfluous. Today, a critical thinker is able to set him or herself apart by lending his or her brain to the many others who have not yet figured it out. Becoming this “thought leader,” if you will, is beneficial in many ways, including the ability to gain the trust of those with whom you wish to connect as well as the authority in the space in which you have established your expertise.

 

Click headline to read more--


Via Chuck Sherwood, Senior Associate, TeleDimensions, Inc
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Improving your Writing Instruction with Kaizena

Improving your Writing Instruction with Kaizena | Teacher Tools and Tips | Scoop.it

Via Darren Burris, Lynnette Van Dyke
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Getting Ready to Write: Citing Textual Evidence

Getting Ready to Write: Citing Textual Evidence | Teacher Tools and Tips | Scoop.it

Learn how to teach students to cite textual evidence, engage in collaborative discussions and draw evidence from literary text in preparation for writing.


Via Maree Whiteley
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Dora Campbell MA CCC SLP's curator insight, December 29, 2013 6:20 PM

An example of a lesson that ties in three common core objectives