Teacher Tools and Tips
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Teacher Tools and Tips
Tools, tips and practices to share with teachers
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Mental and Emotional Karate

Mental and Emotional Karate | Teacher Tools and Tips | Scoop.it

Most school approaches to bullying are what I call outside-in approaches. Teachers and schools officials basically attempt to appeal to their students' sense of decency and right and wrong. They ask them to not "bully" their fellow classmates. Students are rightfully also made aware of the potentially tragic consequences of "bullying". This is usually backed up with a system of consequences, extra vigilance, and strict enforcement. Schools have an obligation to provide a safe environment for every student. To not do the above would be negligent. However, even when such programs are set up and executed as well as possible, "bullying" often still occurs. Some students often still suffer and struggle quietly. Every once in a while, it ends in a "bullycide" or school shooting.

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Book argues that mentoring programs should try to unveil colleges'

Book argues that mentoring programs should try to unveil colleges' | Teacher Tools and Tips | Scoop.it

In her recent book Mentoring At-Risk Students through the Hidden Curriculum of Education (Lexington Books), Smith offers suggestions for how colleges and universities can guide at-risk students – low-income students, first-generation students and underrepresented minorities – through what she calls higher education’s “hidden curriculum.” The hidden curriculum, Smith writes, consists of the “norms, values, and expectations” that govern interactions among students, faculty, staff and administrators. To excel in college, at-risk students must navigate a world of new social norms – typically those of the white middle class, she argues.

 

Sharrock's insight:

mentoring and self-advocacy, relationship building, resilience

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5 Reasons to be Less Materialistic

New studies in psychology are showing some of the negative effects of being too materialistic in our beliefs and attitude.
Sharrock's insight:

There are various ways to interact with this essay against materialism. Is it informative, persuasive? 

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Ten Lessons I Learned from Two Years at Harvard Business School

Ten Lessons I Learned from Two Years at Harvard Business School | Teacher Tools and Tips | Scoop.it
I wrote about a few lessons before I embarked on my MBA journey. Now, I finished the degree and came back to the real world again. It’s time to take a pause and reflect on what I have learned from the HBS experience.

Sharrock's insight:
for teachers who mainly spent their careers in education, this graduate's insights can be very helpful in understanding the changing landscape of leadership and management.
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What Is It to Be Intellectually Humble?

What Is It to Be Intellectually Humble? | Teacher Tools and Tips | Scoop.it

 "Knowledge comes into us through a variety of channels that can be blocked by our concern for status, and the successful knowledge-seeker will be one who keeps those channels open. The process requires that we be able to “listen,” either literally or figuratively, to what others say. If what they say shows them to be superior to us in knowledge, we will be hampered in our learning if our first reaction is to try to show that we know as much as they or more. The process also requires that we be corrigible, that we be open to the possibility that our opinions are in some way misguided. If, whenever our status as knowers is threatened by the specter of correction, we feel that we must prove ourselves to have been in the right, we will have closed off an avenue of knowledge and crippled ourselves as inquirers. It can be particularly galling, if one lacks intellectual humility, to be corrected in a public forum; and the galling can obstruct the process of learning."

 

Sharrock's insight:

from the article: "A lovely example of intellectual humility comes from Alice Ambrose in a report of experiences she had in the classroom of G. E. Moore, the prominent philosopher, at Cambridge University. She reports that in a series of lectures on the concept of truth Moore would sometimes criticize claims that he himself had made, say in an earlier lecture, with the same attitude one would take “to an anonymous philosopher whose mistakes called for correction.” Also, he would sometimes announce that he was going to skip to another stage in the argument because he did not know how to make the transition logically. Moore seemed to be unconcerned about protecting his status as an important professor at Cambridge because he was so deeply concerned with getting at the truth about truth. His love of knowledge swamped his concern for status, and this intellectual humility made him one of the greater philosophers of the 20th century."

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