Teacher Tools and Tips
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Teacher Tools and Tips
Tools, tips and practices to share with teachers
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How Your Brain Keeps You Believing Crap That Isn't True

How Your Brain Keeps You Believing Crap That Isn't True | Teacher Tools and Tips | Scoop.it
we’re tricked by false truths—things we think are true but aren’t. Drinking eight glasses of water a day seems like a good idea, but it doesn’t do a bit of good for your health. Many people believe that Napoleon was short, but there’s good reason to believe he was actually a bit taller than the average Frenchman of his day. Reducing salt intake has never been shown to prevent heart attacks or strokes, and there’s no such thing as an allergy to MSG.
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Simulations Reveal How White Lies Glue Society Together And Black Lies Create Diversity | MIT Technology Review

Simulations Reveal How White Lies Glue Society Together And Black Lies Create Diversity | MIT Technology Review | Teacher Tools and Tips | Scoop.it
Evolutionary biologists have long thought that lying ought to destroy societies. Now computational anthropologists have shown that nothing could be further from the truth.
Sharrock's insight:

Iñiguez  reports that the greatest diversity occurs when there is a certain amount of deception. In that case, white lies strengthen ties while black lies weaken them and this tension allows diversity to flourish. “The results of our study suggest that not all lies are bad or necessarily socially destructive; in fact, it seems that some lies may even enhance the cohesion of the society as a whole and help to create links with other people,” say Iñiguez and co.

 
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The Attack on Truth

The Attack on Truth | Teacher Tools and Tips | Scoop.it
We are entering an age of willful ignorance.

 

Anyone who has been paying attention to the fault lines of academic debate for the past 20 years already knows that the "science wars" were fought by natural scientists (and their defenders in the philosophy of science) on the one side and literary critics and cultural-studies folks on the other. The latter argued that even in the natural realm, truth is relative, and there is no such thing as objectivity. The skirmishes blew up in the well-known "Sokal affair" in 1996, in which a prominent physicist created a scientifically absurd postmodernist paper and was able to get it published in a leading cultural-studies journal. The ridicule that followed may have seemed to settle the matter once and for all.

 
Sharrock's insight:

"when we choose to insulate ourselves from new ideas or evidence because we think that we already know what is true, that is when we are most likely to believe a falsehood. It is not mere disbelief that explains why truth is so often disrespected. It is one’s attitude." (excerpt)

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6-Year-Olds Know When You're Making Sins of Omission

6-Year-Olds Know When You're Making Sins of Omission | Teacher Tools and Tips | Scoop.it
In a new study, kids gave lower ratings to teachers who left out key details about toys. And once misled, they inspected new toys more carefully.
Sharrock's insight:

Ryan Jacobs says, "Bottom-line: Explain the full-fledged functionality of Super Soakers to your kids or risk losing their trust forever."


 

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